KLTZ/MIX-93
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Local News

Welcome to our local news page!

We have 3 local newscasts daily on each station.
1240 AM KLTZ: 7:30am, 12:30pm, 5:30pm
Mix-93 FM: 7:05am, 12:05pm, 5:05pm


Glasgow Police Department

Valley County Jail Roster - click on Valley County Sheriff link

State of Montana Sexual and Violent Offender Web Site

Montana Governor's Cup

Northern News Network

Ag Partners, LLC

Bakers Jewelry

Brian Gregory, Computer Consultant (406-230-0643)

Edward Jones, local agent Bryan Krumwiede

Glenn's Automotive Repair & Wrecker Service

Helland Agency

Ezzie's Midtown

Oasis Lounge Eatery & Casino

Park Grove Bar & Grill

Pehlke's Furniture & Floor Coverings

Robyn's Nest Home Decor and Fine Gifts

Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Shelly George

Triple A Glass

Will's Office World

Gysler Furniture & Appliance in Wolf Point

Glasgow City Council Approves Ballot Language Regarding Putting Chicken Question On November Ballot

Thursday, August 13th 2020

The Glasgow City Council approved ballot language on Wednesday that will put to the voters the legality of raising chickens in the city limits of Glasgow.

Voters in the city limits of Glasgow will vote on this question:

Do you support allowing property owners to maintain six (6) domestic chicken hens, withing the incorporated Glasgow City limits, subject to the regulation by the Official Code of the City of Glasgow?

Only voters in the city limits of Glasgow will receive this question on their ballot for the November 3rd General Election.

Valley County Health Department Requires Event Or Activity Plans Prior To Being Held In Valley County

Thursday, August 13th 2020

Event or Activity Plans are due prior to being held within Valley County. This is for businesses having an event that is in addition to their usual business activity or for someone planning a wedding at any location.

It will help everyone to think of all of the COVID-19 prevention measures that should be considered and the responsibility of holding a gathering of any size. Smaller events may not require a plan, but we still ask that everyone get in touch with the Health Department.

We have a fill-able form that only takes seconds to complete.

Call VCHD at 228-6261 to have information sent via mail, email, fax or in person.

Fort Peck Dam Releases To Increase

Thursday, August 13th 2020

OMAHA, Neb. --
Releases from Fort Peck dam will be increased from 9,000 cubic feet per second to as much as 11,000 cfs to address conditions immediately downstream of the dam.

Releases will begin increasing on Aug. 14, or once planned maintenance projects at the Fort Peck power house are completed.

Releases were reduced to allow planned maintenance and scheduled to remain at 9,000 cfs through August. However, the lower releases were impacting irrigation intakes.

“We will increase the flows to provide some relief without negatively impacting the other authorized purposes,” said John Remus, chief of the Corps’ Missouri River Water Management Division.

The increased releases from Fort Peck dam will not have an effect on system storage or releases from downstream projects, nor will system releases from Gavins Point dam be changed.

The stored runoff from 2020 will be evacuated from the system before the start of the 2021 runoff season.

“We spoke with those who were impacted by the lower releases from Fort Peck dam. They understand that increased releases are not a long-term solution and their systems and facilities will need adjustments to operate with lower releases,” said Remus.

Governor Orders All Public And Private School Buildings To Require Face Masks

Wednesday, August 12th 2020

Story from https://www.ktvh.com/news/montana-news/bullock-says-re-opening-schools-must-require-masks-in-hard-hit-counties

HELENA — Gov. Steve Bullock Wednesday ordered all Montana public and private school buildings to require face masks, in counties with four or more active Covid-19 cases, as he said “encouraging” face masks at re-opened schools won’t be enough.

Bullock issued the new directive as he implored Montanans to follow public-health recommendations to stop the spread of Covid-19. The state reported 175 new cases Wednesday, one of the highest daily counts in Montana so far.

He also announced several new business-assistance programs, including grants for live-entertainment venues and businesses near the east entrances of Glacier National Park and second grants for businesses that have already received one from the state.

And, finally, Bullock said the state is working on a new unemployment system that will give those out of work an additional $400 a week, to replace the $600 a week in federal funds that expired at the end of July.

Congress has not approved any funds for that money, but Bullock said he’ll use cash from the earlier federal Cares Act to finance it for now.

The governor began his Capitol news conference by saying a local official had asked when the state could advance to “Phase 3” of re-opening Montana’s economy after Covid-19 shutdowns, which is basically no restrictions on businesses, gatherings, and other activity.


He said only two things could lead to that end: A vaccine, which is months away, or learning how best to live with the virus – which, he said, Montanans “clearly” haven’t done.

“Learning to live with the virus … isn’t ignoring it, or denying it, or thinking it will magically disappear,” he said.

Bullock said he’s heard of many cases of Montanans ignoring public-health officials’ orders to quarantine, after they’ve tested positive for Covid-19, or not following basic social-distancing guidelines.

He pointed to north-central Montana’s Phillips County, which has gone from no cases to 68 cases in a week, stemming from an adult sports activity and subsequent outings to a bar and other locales.

Phillips County had 15 new cases reported Wednesday, while Yellowstone County had 75 and rural Rosebud and Big Horn counties had 24 and 16, respectively.

The state has now reported 5,268 total cases since the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak and 80 deaths.


Bullock said as schools prepare to re-open this fall, they are more likely to be successful in staying open if they require face coverings for those in school buildings.

While many schools are still considering that requirement or whether to encourage face masks, Bullock said “strongly encouraging” won’t be enough, and that he is expanding his earlier face-mask directive for public buildings and places of business to include all schools in counties with four or more active Covid-19 cases.

Twenty-seven Montana counties were at that threshold Wednesday, including all eight of the state’s most populous counties

The new grants for live-entertainment venues will be for 25 percent of the business’ 2019 gross revenue, with a maximum of $500,000 each. The grants for businesses near the east Glacier Park entrances will be for the same percentage of revenue, up to $40,000 per business.

Phillips County With 64 Active Cases Of COVID-19

Wednesday, August 12th 2020

Press Release From Phillips County Health Department:

Today, August 11, 2020, we have received confirmation of an additional 21 lab-confirmed positive COVID-19 cases. All of these individuals are isolated and recovering at home. We have 9 individuals who have met the criteria to be recovered.

Unfortunately, we have 1 individual who is currently hospitalized. Our thoughts and prayers go out to them and their family. We hope for them to get back on the road to recovery.

Phillips County
Active Cases: 64
Total Cases: 73
Active Hospitalizations: 1
Recovered: 9

Death Penalty Case Filed By AG Candidate Goes Before Montana Supreme Court

Wednesday, August 12th 2020

Story From Billings Gazette:


A Roosevelt County man charged with deliberate homicide in the strangulation death of his girlfriend is asking the Montana Supreme Court to take the death penalty off the table.

The case against Clovis Christopher Geno was filed in February by Roosevelt County Attorney Austin Knudsen. Knudsen is the Republican nominee for the Montana Attorney General’s race this fall.

Geno is accused of fatally strangling Ramona Hilton Naramore at their Culbertson apartment sometime between Jan. 25 and Jan. 26. Neighbors told investigators that Geno had a history of physically abusing his girlfriend and noted she expressed fear of him and sometimes had visible injuries, charges state.

Defense attorneys for Geno have twice asked the lower court to strike the death penalty as a possible sentence and twice been denied. District Judge David Cybulski is hearing the case.

On Friday Geno’s attorneys filed a petition for a writ of supervisory control, a legal tool in Montana that allows the Montana Supreme Court to step in when asked in cases where the lower court is proceeding under a mistake of law. The writs are issued only when the normal appeals process is found to be inadequate.

Geno’s attorneys, Greg Rapkoch and Alisha Backus of the Office of the State Public Defender, say Knudsen did not follow the proper legal process to seek the death penalty and the lower court must be corrected.


"There are few, if any, graver constitutional questions or injustices of statewide importance than an impermissible capital prosecution,” the attorneys wrote.

Specifically, the defense argues that Knudsen failed to make clear what aggravating fact or facts qualify the case as a death penalty case.

Knudsen also failed to file a special notice of intent to seek the death penalty within 60 days of arraignment, the defense attorneys said.

Knudsen did note he intended to seek the death penalty in charging documents, but defense attorneys argue that wasn’t enough to comply with the state’s rules for death penalty cases.

He also filed a “Notice of Evidence of Death Penalty Aggravating Factors,” but he did so past the deadline, or 64 days after arraignment. Defense attorneys argue the filing was still not sufficient to comply with the rules.

Geno’s attorneys said that the requirements for death penalty cases are necessary because they put the Office of the Public Defender on notice that qualified counsel needs to be appointed.

The state has specific requirements for defense attorneys in death penalty cases, including having a certain amount of legal education on capital punishment, experience in homicide cases, and having a limited workload that allows for enough time to be spent on the client facing the death penalty.

Early on in the case, Cybulski, the district court judge, issued a gag order barring attorneys from making extra-judicial statements to the media.

Defense attorneys had asked for the order, citing concerns that their client get a fair trial and noting that Knudsen had been posting about the case publicly on his personal Facebook page.

The order was issued March 6, and Geno was arraigned March 11.

Attorney General Tim Fox is listed as a party in the petition, but the office is not assisting in the case, as it sometimes does with death penalty or other cases.

A spokesman for the Department of Justice said it's routine for defense counsel to list the attorney general's office on all filings before the Montana Supreme Court, regardless of whether the office is helping to prosecute.

Spokesman John Barnes said the office was unaware that Knudsen was seeking the death penalty in the case until Monday.

In 2015, a Montana district court judge ruled that the drug scheduled to be used in executions, pentobarbital, did not meet the legal standard for lethal injection. The order effectively put a hold on executions in the state.

Two men are currently in Montana State Prison awaiting execution.

Valley County Man Dies In Motorcycle Accident

Tuesday, August 11th 2020

A Valley County man was the victim of a motorcycle accident on Montana Highway 24 South on Monday afternoon.

Valley County Sheriff Tom Boyer told Kltz/Mix 93 that Charles Patrick Dunn died Monday afternoon as the result of the accident. Dunn was 66 years of age according to Sheriff Boyer.

Phillips County Reports 52 Active Cases Of COVID-19

Tuesday, August 11th 2020

Message from Phillips County Health Department in Malta:

Monday, we received confirmation of an additional 7 lab-confirmed positive COVID-19 cases, bringing the total active case count to 52. These individuals are isolated and recovering at home. Phillips County Health Department is working to identify any close contacts. You will be notified by PCHD if you are a close contact and will be given further instructions.
If you are experiencing any symptoms such as fever, cough, shortness of breath, headache, congestion, nausea/diarrhea, loss of taste or smell, or body aches, call your healthcare provider.

Phillips County
Active Cases: 52
Active Hospitalizations: 0
Recovered: 0

The state has changed the way reporting is done regarding covid-19 cases. There WILL be a delay! For the most up to date information, refer to our Facebook page. The map will eventually get caught as we get cases entered. Thank you for understanding!

Please Avoid The Bees

Tuesday, August 11th 2020

The U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers is advising people to stay away from a large downed cottonwood tree near the horseshoe pits and playground at Kiwanis Park. A wild honeybee colony is being relocated into a hive box.

Facebook link

Valley View Home Under Temporary Isolation Restrictions

Tuesday, August 11th 2020

Valley View Home would like to inform you that we had to unfortunately place our residents on temporary isolation restrictions until a further investigation is completed so that we are certain there is no possible exposure to the COVID-19.

We can say that none of our staff and residents have been tested positive for the virus. Our staff will be doing everything they can in order to keep our residents comfortable under this temporary situation. We will not be allowing entrance door visits during this restriction.

Please don’t hesitate to call if you have any further questions.

Yard Of The Week!

Tuesday, August 11th 2020

The Yard of the Week this week belongs to Ken and Delores Farquhar at 940 3rd Avenue South in Glasgow!

Valley County Adds Five COVID-19 Cases

Monday, August 10th 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 8/10/2020 4:00pm
VALLEY COUNTY COVID-19 UPDATE

(Valley County, Montana): Valley County Public Health Department and Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital confirm 5 new positive cases of COVID-19 in Valley County.
Valley County has 8 active cases as of August 10th, 2020 at 4:00pm. Valley County has had 23 cases total, with 15 cases recovered.
Case 19: A female in her 20s who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. This individual was named as a contact to a positive case and is symptomatic.
Case 20: A male in his 30s who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. The individual was named as a contact to a positive case and is symptomatic.
Case 21: A female in her 20s who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. The individual is symptomatic.
Case 22: A female in her 20s who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. The individual is symptomatic.
Case 23: A male in his 20s who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. The individual is symptomatic.

As there are currently four or more active COVID-19 cases, masks are MANDATORY in Valley County.


Montana and Valley County Lag Behind In Census Count

Monday, August 10th 2020

The U.S. Census Bureau is ending all counting efforts for the 2020 census on Sept. 30, a month sooner than previously announced, the bureau's director confirmed last week in a statement. That includes critical door-knocking efforts and collecting responses online, over the phone and by mail.

The latest updates to the bureau's plans are part of efforts to "accelerate the completion of data collection and apportionment counts by our statutory deadline of December 31, 2020, as required by law and directed by the Secretary of Commerce" who oversees the bureau, Director Steven Dillingham said in the written statement posted on the bureau's website.

These last-minute changes to the constitutionally mandated count of every person living in the U.S. threaten the accuracy of population numbers used to determine the distribution of political representation and federal funding for the next decade.

With roughly 4 out of 10 households nationwide yet to be counted, and already delayed by the coronavirus pandemic, the bureau now has less than two months left to try to reach people of color, immigrants, renters, rural residents and other members of historically undercounted groups who are not likely to fill out a census form on their own.

The response rate in Montana lags behind many other states and the national rate of return is 63.2% compared to a 56.8% return rate in Montana.

In Valley County the rate of return is just 39.3% compared to 29.6% in Phillips County and 33.6% in Roosevelt County. Montana's more populous counties are doing much better with Yellowstone at 70.7% and Missoula County at 67.8%.

In Glasgow the return rate is 62.1% while Fort Peck is 66.9%, Nashua 46.5% and Opheim 32.1%.

Valley County To Consider Vote By Mail For November General Election

Monday, August 10th 2020

Governor Steve Bullock last week issued a directive to ensure all eligible Montanans can safely vote in the 2020 November general election by allowing counties to expand voting by mail and early voting. Whether or not they provide mail ballots, all counties will be required to offer in person voting opportunities and take precautions to ensure Montanans have the option to register or vote safely.

“I am in agreement with our bipartisan election administrators – who are the ones on the ground with the first-hand knowledge of how to successfully conduct an election – that we must protect Montanans’ right to vote, while protecting the public’s health,” Governor Bullock said. “Locally elected officials best understand the voting needs of their communities, and taking this action now ensures they will have the time to make the right decisions for their localities. With this approach we can protect that fundamental right to vote, while easing crowding and pressure on voting on Election Day.”

The directive permits counties, at their discretion, to expand access to voting by mail and early voting. Counties that opt to vote by mail will still require counties to allow in person voting. All counties must ensure appropriate social distancing to provide safe voting and voter registration for all Montanans.

The Valley County Commissioners are expected to make a decision on vote by mail this week.

For the primary election, county election administrators adeptly managed the change in procedures and held a safe election marked by an increase in voter turnout compared to previous primary elections. In July, the bipartisan Montana Association of Clerk and Recorders and Election Administrators as well as the Montana Association of Counties requested that Governor Bullock again give counties the option to conduct a mail ballot election in November. Their request stressed the ethical concerns with following standard election procedures, which would produce serious risks for voters and poll workers alike—effectively forcing Montanans to choose between their safety and the right to vote. The election administrators also stressed the chaos that could follow if polling locations are closed at the last minute or if counties are forced to consolidate polling locations in response to outbreaks.

The option to provide mail ballots while expanding early voting will protect Montanans’ right to vote, while protecting the public’s health. The CDC has recognized that in person voting on election day increases the risk of transmitting COVID-19, and has urged states to use voting methods that reduce crowd size. Many Montana election workers are over the age of 60 and are often in close proximity to each other, large crowds, and interact with paper, pens, and other items that could be infected and exchanged frequently.

Governor Bullock’s Directive contains three central components:

Counties may choose to send mail ballots and expand early voting for the November 3, 2020 general election.
Counties are encouraged to publicize available options and to work with nonprofit organizations to ensure that all Montanans will have access to a ballot, whether in person, early, or by mail.
All counties must establish, implement, and enforce social distancing policies at polling locations, designated drop-off locations, or other public-facing portions of facilities involved in voting.
The Directive largely mirrors the June 2020 primary Directive, but also reflects feedback from the bipartisan group of county election administrators, who studied the June 2020 primary. The Directive encourages election administrators to publicize mail and early voting options, to make options available to voters early, and to work with local nonprofit organizations to facilitate voting on reservations in particular. Based on county election administrators’ feedback, the directive also requests that the Secretary of State’s Office include designated place of deposit locations on voters’ “My Voter Page” profiles in addition to available polling places and recommends that Automark or Expressvote technology be made available at polling locations from Oct. 2 through election day.

Additionally, the Directive provides expanded timelines for voter registration, ballot distribution, and early voting opportunities. The Directive extends the close of regular voter registration until 10 days before the election to minimize the need for in-person registration or lines. County election administrators will be able to make ballots available from Oct. 2 until the end of the election. Mail-in ballots will be sent on Oct. 9 and no postage will be required to return ballots by mail.

Finally, the Directive requires that counties, regardless of their voting procedures, implement social distancing guidelines to make voter registration and voting safer for all Montanans and reduce spreading COVID-19 within communities. As CDC guidelines provide, counties must ensure a minimum of six feet of distancing between individuals at polling locations, designated drop-off locations, or public-facing portions of facilities involved in voting.

Update From Valley County Health Department from 8/8/2020 @ 9:30pm

Sunday, August 9th 2020

Update From Valley County Health Department from 8/8/2020 @ 9:30pm


We have been notified of 10 more contacts to positive case #18. These individuals are all between the ages of 10-19. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing will resume on 8/9/2020. Please ensure that your children are wearing masks and following social distancing guidelines.

8/8/2020 6:00 pm
Valley County - positive COVID-19 case update
Total -- 18
Active -- 7
Recovered -- 11

Case 18: A male aged 10-19 who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. Contact tracing is complete. This individual was symptomatic. Suspected exposure is through community contact.

Update From Phillips County 8/8/2020

Sunday, August 9th 2020

Saturday August 8, 2020:

Phillips County Health Department has been notified of an additional 16 lab-confirmed positive COVID-19 cases. All cases are isolated and recovering at home. Also, our one hospitalized case is now recovering at home.

PCHD is asking everyone to do their part. If you have been told to quarantine, you NEED to do so. With the large spike of cases in Phillips County, contact tracing is becoming difficult and the only way to slow the spread and lessen the impact on our healthcare resources, is to follow our guidelines. This includes following the mask mandate, maintaining social distance, avoiding large gatherings and cancelling any events over 50 people.

Phillips County
Total Active Cases: 44
Active Hospitalizations: 0
Recovered: 0

Valley County Now Up To Six Active Cases

Saturday, August 8th 2020

From Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital -
8-8-2020 3:00 pm

Valley County now has 17 positive COVID-19 cases total with 6 active and 11 recovered.

Case 16: A female in her 30s who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. This individual is symptomatic. Suspected exposure is through community contact.

Case 17: A female aged 10-19 who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. The individual was named as a contact to a positive case and became symptomatic during quarantine.

KLTZ To Air U.S. Senate Debate On Saturday

Friday, August 7th 2020

KLTZ will air the U.S. senate debate at 6 p.m. this Saturday, August 8th.

Ron Davis, Chair, Greater Montana Foundation and Keith Teske, Chair, Montana Broadcasters Association, announced today that the two groups will hold a Senatorial debate between candidates Governor Steve Bullock and US Senator Steve Daines, on Saturday, August 8. The debate will be virtual, due to concerns about the Covid-19 virus and conducted on the Zoom platform. Recorded live earlier in the day, the debate will be broadcast on statewide radio and TV stations at six o’clock pm Saturday.

Teske and Davis stated: “We believe we are providing a real service to Montana citizens at a time when candidates are not able to hold events or travel around the state meeting people, as they usually do. A well-informed electorate is a bedrock of democracy and this debate will help educate Montanans about each candidate, their views and where they agree or disagree.”

Ron Davis, GMF Board Chair and President of Butte Broadcasting will serve as moderator. Panelists are Mike Dennison, Montana Television Network; Maritsa Georgiou, NBC Montana; Troy Shockley, KCAP, The Montana Radio Company, and Ben Wineman, Cowles Media. Questions will not be available in advance nor solicited from the public. Panelists will decide on the questions.

Panelists’ Backgrounds:
Mike Dennison, the chief political reporter for the Montana Television Network, based in Helena. He has been covering politics full-time in Montana for 28 years, with MTN, and earlier as a news reporter.
Maritsa Georgiou is an evening anchor at NBC Montana, with politics as one of her broadcast specialties. Her grandfather worked for E.B.Craney at KXLF Radio in Butte and she was awarded the 2019 E.B. Craney award as Television Broadcaster of the Year by Montana Broadcasters Association.

Troy Shockley is an award-winning news director and talk show host at KCAP and the Montana Radio Company. Earlier, he spent 20 years in the newspaper industry.

Ben Wineman, is an evening news anchor for Cowles Montana Media Company for KTMF/KWYB/KFBB/KULR and named runner-uo for Broadcaster of the Year 2020, by Montana Broadcasters Association.

Davis and Teske encouraged all Montanans to take advantage of the opportunity to view and to listen to this important debate between the candidates for the US Senate. They applauded the longtime relationship between GMF and MBA. The two organizations partner on the annual “EB” awards for excellence in broadcasting, which helps build better broadcasting for Montana. During election years, GMF helps fund debates which usually take place at MBA’s annual convention.

The EBs are named for pioneer broadcaster, E. B. Craney, who established the Greater Montana Foundation in 1958. Its initial focus on improving commercial broadcasting in the state has expanded to include a mission of “encouraging communications, with an emphasis on electronic media, on issues, trends and values of importance to present and future generations of Montanans, ” with grants awarded to the University of Montana Radio and TV school, Montana PBS, Montana NPR and a wide variety of documentaries, films, broadcasts and podcasts.

Valley County Active Cases Back Up To Four

Thursday, August 6th 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 8/6/2020
VALLEY COUNTY COVID-19 UPDATE

(Valley County, Montana): Valley County Public Health Department and Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital confirm the 15th positive case of COVID-19 in Valley County.

Valley County has four (4) active cases as of August 6th, 2020 at 4:30pm. Valley County has had 15 cases total, with 11 cases recovered.

Case 15: A male in his 30s tested positive who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. Exposure is suspected due to travel. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. The individual is symptomatic.

As there are currently four or more active COVID-19 cases, masks are MANDATORY in Valley County.

MASKS REQUIRED IN VALLEY COUNTY:

As per the Governor’s Directive on July 15, 2020:.

• Except as provided in section 4 of this Directive, all businesses, government offices, or other persons responsible for indoor spaces open to the public shall require and take reasonable measures to ensure that all employees, contractors, volunteers, customers, or other members of the public wear a face covering that covers their mouth and nose at all times while entering or remaining in any indoor spaces open to the public.

• Face coverings shall be provided for all employees and volunteers.

• All points of entry open to the public shall have a clearly visible sign posted stating: “Mask or face covering use required for ages five and older.”

• The provisions of this Directive apply only to counties in which there are four or more confirmed and active COVID-19 cases, and only during the time in which there are four or more active cases. However, Montanans in counties with three or fewer active cases are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings.

For additional information and printable masks required posters you can access the Governor’s Mask Directive online at:
https://covid19.mt.gov/Masks-and-Face-Coverings

Glasgow School District Planning In-Class Instruction This Fall: Masks Will Be Required

Thursday, August 6th 2020

(Press release from Glasgow Supt. Wade Sundby)

The first day of school for the Glasgow School District will be August 26, 2020.

Glasgow School District will be having in-class instruction Monday - Thursday. If a student needs additional help or is deemed "non-proficient in a class" they will attend on Friday.

We will follow the usual start and end time for the school day as in previous years Monday - Thursday. On Friday we will run an 8-period schedule at GMS and GHS ending @ 1:45 pm. This day will be remote or in-person depending on the student, parent, and teacher. Teachers will be in the buildings. We will run on the red/white schedule 4 periods a day (M-T) and 8 periods on Friday.

Irle School:
K-3 Monday - Thursday 8:35 am - 3:15 pm
K-3 Friday 8:35 am - 1:30 pm

4-5 Monday - Thursday 8:10 am - 3:15 pm
4-5 Friday 8:10 am - 1:40 pm

GMS:
Monday-Thursday 8:10 am - 3:29 pm
Friday 8:10 am - 1:45 pm

GHS:
Monday -Thursday 8:10 am - 3:25 pm
Friday 8:10 am - 1:45 pm

Classes will run Monday through Thursday. Friday will be a day our non-proficient students attend in-person class. All other students needing additional support will set up a time during their scheduled class period to meet with their teachers.

Glasgow School District will require masks for the safety of our students and staff K-12.

Parents will have the option to opt-out of in-class instruction further information will be provided next week.

We will continue to provide you with information as it develops.

Thank you!

Wade O. Sundby

COVID-19 Test Results Still Pending

Wednesday, August 5th 2020

Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital sincerely apologizes for the delay in results from the community surveillance testing that occurred on July 15th (at the Fairgrounds and Downtown testing sites).

At this time laboratories are overwhelmed with tests, resulting in longer than anticipated processing time. At the time of testing we predicted receiving results in 14-20 days. We have now exceeded that timeline.

Test results will be mailed out the day that they are received, and any positive results will also promptly receive a phone call from the Valley County Health Department.

Again, we apologize and thank you for your patience and understanding.

Brews For A Cause Is Tonight

Wednesday, August 5th 2020

The Fort Peck Fine Arts Council & Busted Knuckle Brewery are teaming up for Brews For A Cause Wed. Aug. 5th, from 5 - 8p.m.

The event is geared to help raise funds for the new stage floor at the Fort Peck Summer Theatre.

Sean Bergstrom & Seth Morehouse will be there with the Berg House food truck at 5:30p.m.

$1 per pint of BKB beer or wine will be donated towards the new stage floor.

Don’t forget to wear your mask!

Winners Announced For Feda Scholarship For The Trades

Wednesday, August 5th 2020

The Feda Scholarship for the Trades will assist three 2020 Valley County graduates with their studies this fall, one focusing on welding and two on power line construction and maintenance. Doris Leader of Nashua, chair of the Valley County Community Foundation, which administers the scholarship endowment, announced the awards.

Recipient Mack Winchester will study welding at MSU-Northern in Havre. He is a Nashua High School graduate and the son of Denise Winchester.

Glasgow High School graduates Kobe Sibley and Trevor Shipp will study power line construction and maintenance at the Mitchell Technical Institute in Mitchell, SD. Sibley is the son of John and McKenzie Kalinski and Shipp the son of Cam and Kim Shipp.

Audrey and Gerry Feda of Glasgow established the scholarship with an endowment to the Foundation in 2007. It benefits graduates of Valley County high schools who pursue an education in the trades and previous recipients who continue their studies in the trades.

Earnings from the endowment fund the annual awards, with the first scholarship given in 2009. Since then, 27 students have received a total of $41,500. Previous recipients have pursued many different careers, including radiology technology, respiratory care, agronomy, diesel and computer technology and aviation mechanics.

Applications for 2021 scholarships will be available in the spring. Notice of requirements and the application deadline are given through the VCCF website: www.valleycountycf.net , local media and high school guidance counselors.

Glasgow School Board To Meet On Thursday To Make Decision Regarding School Reopening

Tuesday, August 4th 2020

The Glasgow School Board will meet on Thursday at 9am to make a decision regarding school reopening for this fall.

Yard Of The Week Selected

Tuesday, August 4th 2020

Brandon and Somer Hoerster were selected as the Yard of the Week by Glasgow City Council member Todd Young. The yard is located at 735 9th Street North in Glasgow.

City Of Glasgow Implements Wage Scale For Employees

Tuesday, August 4th 2020

The Glasgow City Council has voted to implement a wage matrix for all employees of the City of Glasgow. This new matrix is based on a federal wage matrix and provides for an annual increase in pay for all city employees.

All city employees started off with an increase in pay effective July 1st.
Examples of new hourly pay rates for city employees:

A newly hired officer in the Glasgow Police Department will start with a wage of $22.78.

The Glasgow Police Chief has a wage of $30.02 per hour which is an increase of 31 cents per hour from last year.

Employees in the City Street Department will see their wages increase to $22.67 per hour which is a bump of .65 cents per hour compared to last year.

Employees in the City Water Department will see a .65 cent increase per hour as well which will boost their hourly wage to $23.02 per hour.

The supervisor of the City Street Department has a wage of $23.58 per hour while the supervisor at the City Cemetery will be paid $23.40 per hour.

The City Court Judge has a wage of $25.38 per hour but it should be noted this is a part-time position.

The Public Works Director is the highest paid position in the city with an hourly wage of $34.87 per hour while the City Clerk/Treasurer has a wage of $27.71 per hour.

The wage matrix implemented by the City Council is a 2 year plan and employees will see another bump in pay next fiscal year to fully implement the wage matrix.

Glasgow Business Receives Grant From The Montana Meat Processing Infrastructure Grant Program

Tuesday, August 4th 2020

MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock and the Montana Department of Agriculture (MDA) today announced that over $7.5 million in grant funding has been awarded through the Montana Meat Processing Infrastructure Grant (MMPIG) programs. The grants are designed to aid small and medium-sized meat processors in responding to the COVID-19 crisis through the adaptation and advancement of meat processing infrastructure and capacity in Montana.

“The impacts of COVID-19 have highlighted how fragile the nation’s supply chain can be, especially when it comes to meat processing,” said Governor Steve Bullock. “It’s crucial that our producers have viable options for getting their meat to market. Investing in meat processing infrastructure will help our Montana producers, strengthen local food systems, and bolster food security for Montanans in communities across the state from Plains to Circle.”

The grant program received incredible interest which reflects the necessity for increased in-state meat processing capacity. Strengthening infrastructure and capacity will increase market options for Montana’s cattle, hog and poultry producers and protect consumers from supply chain disruption. Businesses received funding for equipment and infrastructure, such as additional cooler or freezer space, slaughter floor enhancements, and other business adaptation and diversification activities that will increase processing and/or storage capacity related to local meat processing.

Funding for the MMPIG was derived from the state’s allocation of federal relief dollars made available through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, with a maximum award of $150,000. Over 60 businesses received funding. The Montana Department of Agriculture and Department of Livestock worked in conjunction to ensure projects adhered to meat processing rules and regulations. A list of recipients is included with this release.

The Montana Department of Agriculture’s mission is to protect producers and consumers, and to enhance and develop agriculture and allied industries. For more information on the Montana Department of Agriculture, visit agr.mt.gov.

Montana Meat Processing Infrastructure Grant Recipients

406 Processing – Great Falls, MT
$120,428 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

4th Avenue Meat Market – Billings, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

5D Processing – Choteau, MT
$54,500 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Amsterdam Meat Shop – Belgrade, MT
$138,140 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Auggie’s Processing Plant – Broadus, MT
$145,000 to assist with equipment purchases and construction of a new processing facility.

Bainville Meats – Bainville, MT
$144,583 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

BCH Discount Meats – Great Falls, MT
$87,160 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase processing capacity.

Bear Paw Meats – Chinook, MT
$103,585 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase processing capacity.

Beaverhead Meats – Dillon, MT
$90,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage capacity and upgrade waste management infrastructure and sanitization processes.

Big Sandy Meat Shop – Malta, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to achieve federal inspection certification.

Biiluuke Strong – Hardin, MT
$115,129 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Black Dog Farm – Livingston, MT
$88,046 to assist with construction of a poultry processing facility.

Butcher Block Specialties – Miles City, MT
$100,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

C&C Meat Processing – Browning, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases, slaughter floor installation and facility modifications for increased cold storage and processing capacity.

Castle Mountain Grocery – White Sulphur Springs, MT
$149,872 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Christiaens Meats – Valier, MT
$33,974 to assist with equipment purchases to increase processing capacity.

Clark Fork Custom Meats – Plains, MT
$140,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Cordova Farms – Choteau, MT
$140,273 to assist with the purchase of a Plant in Box shipping container poultry processing facility.

Cowboy Meat Company – Forsyth, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Craig’s Meat Processing – Sidney, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Dabucha’s Outdoors – Shelby, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases, slaughter floor expansion and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Diamond D Bar Processing – Geraldine, MT
$97,896 to assist with the equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Eastern Montana Meats – Sidney, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases and construction of a new facility.

Farm-to-Market Pork – Kalispell, MT
$140,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and expand processing capacity to include beef as well as pork.

Feddes Family Meats – Manhattan, MT
$147,490 to assist with and equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Hilger Meats – Lewistown, MT
$139,711 to assist with equipment purchases, slaughter floor installation and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Judith Mountain Meats – Lewistown, MT
$61,878 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

L and S Meat Processing – Lima, MT
$99,065 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

K & S Meat – Helena, MT
$145,830 to assist with the construction of a new facility for increased cold storage capacity and the purchase of a mobile slaughter truck for increased processing capacity.

Lazy BK Ranch – Hamilton, MT
$41,900 to assist with equipment purchases and the completion of processing facility.

Living River Farms – Stevensville, MT
$140,000 to assist with equipment purchases and the construction of a poultry processing facility.

Lolo Locker – Missoula, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Lower Valley Processing – Kalispell, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

M3 Meats – Sidney, Mt
$125,259 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Matt’s Butcher Shop & Deli – Livingston, MT
$140,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Miles Community College – Miles City, Mt
$117,397 to assist with training and educating Montana residents about meat processing.

Millers Custom Processing – Red Lodge, MT
$104,671 to assist with equipment purchases and facility upgrades to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Milligan Canyon Meats – Three Forks, MT
$45,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Mission Mountain Food Enterprise Center – Ronan, MT
$72,500 to assist with equipment purchases to increase processing capacity.

Montana Marbled Meats – Polson, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

North American Foods of Montana – Hamilton, MT
$115,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage capacity.

North West Montana Veterans Stand Down – Kalispell, MT
$63,443 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase capacity for repackaging and distributing meat donations to veterans and their families.

Pekovitch Meats – Malta, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases, slaughter floor installation and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Pioneer Meats – Big Timber, MT
$140,000 to assist with equipment purchases and renovation of an existing processing facility to increase domestic animal processing and cold storage capacity.

Powder River Meat Company – Terry, MT
$116,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to reopen facility.

Project Meats – Billings, MT
$50,000 to assist with facility upgrades and construction of an additional facility.

Ranchland Packing– Butte, MT
$140,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Rawhide Meats – White Sulphur Springs, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Round Butte Custom Cuts – Ronan, Mt
$136,477 to assist with equipment purchases and mobile slaughter unit to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Ryan Grocery & Processing – Jordan, MT
$116,939 to equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

S Ranch Meats – Hardin, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases for a new processing facility.

School House Meats (Missoula Schools) – Missoula, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase processing capacity.

Superior Meats – Superior, MT
$140,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase processing capacity.

T and A Ranch – Cascade, MT
$150,000 to assist with construction of a new processing facility.

T&G Processing – Circle, MT
$148,105 to assist with equipment purchases, slaughter floor installation and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

The Butcher Block – Great Falls, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases, slaughter floor installation and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Treasure Trail Meat Processing – Glasgow, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Triple T Specialty Meats – Glendive, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Uncle Sweetie’s Processing – Jordan, MT
$94,472 to assist with equipment purchases and facility modifications to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Vandevanter Meats – Columbia Falls, MT
$150,000 to assist with equipment purchases to increase cold storage and processing capacity.

Western Meat & Sausage Block – Butte, MT
$71,201 to assist with equipment purchases to increase processing capacity.

Western Wildlife Art Taxidermy and Processing – Forsyth, MT
$133,500 to assist with equipment purchases to covert taxidermy storage facility to a processing facility.

USDA Identifies 14 Different Seeds That Appear To Have Been Sent From China

Sunday, August 2nd 2020

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has identified some of the plant species in bags of unsolicited seeds arriving in mailboxes across the United States. Officials have warned the shipments of mystery seeds, which appear to have originated in China, could be invasive plant species.


So far, however, the species appear to be innocuous. At least 14 of the seed species had been identified as of July 29, according to Deputy Administrator Osama El-Lissy of the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. They includes mustard, cabbage and morning glory as well as herbs like mint, sage, rosemary and lavender. He said hibiscus and roses were also found.

CBS News confirmed that residents in all 50 states have reported receiving the suspicious packages of seeds. The USDA said if you receive the packets of seeds, do not plant them and contact your state plant regulatory official.

Although the species identified so far are harmless, plant experts have warned that seeds from other parts of the world could damage crops.


State agriculture officials in Virginia warned, "Invasive species wreak havoc on the environment, displace or destroy native plants and insects and severely damage crops. Taking steps to prevent their introduction is the most effective method of reducing both the risk of invasive species infestations and the cost to control and mitigate those infestations."

Texas Department of Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller urged people to be cautious. "It could be a bacteria. It could be another virus, some kind of invasive species," Miller told CBS Dallas-Fort Worth.

Robin Pruisner, a state seed control official at the Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship in Iowa, told Reuters that she has heard reports of a coating of possible insecticide or fungicide on the seeds, which could prove especially harmful to crops.

The Agriculture Department has said the packages are most likely part of a "brushing" scam, in which a seller sends unsolicited items to someone and then posts false positive customer reviews to boost sales.

"Brushing scams involving seed packets in international mail shipments are not uncommon," the USDA said. "U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has intercepted similar seed shipments in recent years."

Phylissia Clark of the Better Business Bureau told CBS DFW that if you are a victim of brushing, "your identity has been compromised."


"Somebody knows enough about you to create a profile online and use you to manipulate systems," Clark said.

The seeds typically arrive in white packages displaying Chinese lettering and the words "China Post." The USDA continues to investigate.

Valley County Reports Another Positive Case Of COVID-19

Saturday, August 1st 2020

Masks Now Mandatory In Valley County

Thursday, July 30th 2020

(Valley County, Montana): Valley County Public Health Department and Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital confirm the ninth, tenth, and eleventh (9th, 10th, and 11th) positive cases of COVID-19 in Valley County.

Valley County has Six (6) active cases as of July 29th, 2020 at 4pm. Valley County has had eleven (11) cases total, with five (5) cases recovered.

Case #9 A female in her 50s who is not symptomatic and will isolate at home. This case was identified
through contact to a positive and contact tracing is complete.

Case #10 A male in his 70s who is not symptomatic and is isolating at home. This case was identified
through contact to a positive and contact tracing is complete.

Case #11 A female in her 60s who is not symptomatic and is isolating at home. This case was identified
through contact to a positive. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun.

As there are currently four or more active COVID-19 cases, masks are now MANDATORY In Valley County.

MASKS NOW REQUIRED IN VALLEY COUNTY
As per the Governor's Directive on July 15, 2020:
• Except as provided in section 4 of this Directive, all businesses, government offices, or other persons responsible for
indoor spaces open to the public shall require and take reasonable measures to ensure that all employees, contractors, volunteers, customers, or other members of the public wear a face covering that covers their mouth and nose at all times while entering or remaining in any indoor spaces open to the public.
• Face coverings shall be provided for all employees and volunteers.
• All points of entry open to the public shall have a clearly visible sign posted stating: "Mask or face covering use required for ages five and older."
• The provisions of this Directive apply only to counties in which there are four or more confirmed and active COVID-19 cases. and only during the time in which there are four or more active cases. However, Montanans in counties with three or fewer active cases are strongly encouraged to wear face coverings.

For additional information and printable masks required posters you can access the Governor's Mask Directive online at: https://covid19.mt.gov/Masks-and-Face-Coverings

Billings Gazette Reports Train/Truck Collision Near Brockton Claims Life Of Sidney Man

Wednesday, July 29th 2020

Story from Billings Gazette

A train collided with a semi-truck Tuesday morning in Roosevelt County, killing the driver.

According to the Montana Highway Patrol, a Freightliner truck was driving eastbound on U.S. Highway 2 near Brockton. At a crossing near BIA Route 1, a train struck the vehicle on the driver’s side, killing the driver. There were no other reported injuries.

MHP reported the driver to be a 24-year-old man from Sidney. The crash is still under investigation at this time.

In May, a 65-year-old man from Sidney died on impact after an Amtrak passenger train struck a tractor near Bainville. The collision derailed the train, injuring four on board the train.

Tuesday’s report marks the 105th death on Montana’s roads for 2020, 20 of which have occurred on its interstates.

County Election Officials Want Decision By August 10th Regarding All-Mail Ballot For November General Election

Wednesday, July 29th 2020

Story from Krtv.com

County election officials have asked Gov. Steve Bullock to decide by Aug. 10 whether they can conduct an all-mail ballot for the November general election, saying they must make that call soon, for planning purposes.

The top election official in Lewis and Clark County also told MTN News Tuesday she’d be recommending an all-mail Nov. 3 ballot for her county – and indicated that other counties are seeing the same coronavirus-related problems as she does, with having polling stations.

“We have five polling stations that are not available, out of 18, and we have several that have said, `it depends,’” said Audrey McCue, election administrator for Lewis and Clark County in Helena. “We can’t plan an event of that scale with an `it depends.’”

Counties around the state also are saying they doubt they can get enough election judges to staff polling stations, because of concerns about Covid-19 infection, she added.

Bullock, who declared a state of emergency in late March to battle the coronavirus pandemic, has the power to supersede state election law during the emergency and allow counties to choose all-mail ballots for the statewide election.

He made that call for the primary election and Montana had a record turnout on June 2, surpassing the old primary-election high by 90,000 voters.

Bullock’s office told MTN News he’ll consult with election and health officials and political leaders from both parties before deciding what to do for the general election, which is 14 weeks away.

County election officials formally asked Bullock on Friday to allow them to choose whether to conduct an all-mail ballot for the general election -- and asked that he make that decision by Aug. 10, which is 85 days before the election.

This general election is one of the biggest elections in Montana in the past two decades. Voters will be choosing a new governor, attorney general, U.S. House representative, state auditor and secretary of state, and will decide one of the top U.S. Senate races in the country: Bullock vs. Republican U.S. Sen. Steve Daines.

They’ll also be voting on the next president, in a contest that some see as tightening, between President Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden.

Historically, general elections in presidential years draw at least 200,000 more voters in Montana than the primary election. If that margin holds this year, turnout for the general election would top 80 percent.

President Trump and some GOP officials nationwide have criticized mail voting and are fighting efforts to increase it, sometimes alleging that it’s more prone to voter fraud.

But Montana county election officials said all-mail voting here has many security measures and that any suggestion that it’s more susceptible to fraud “is demonstrably false in Montana.”

The Montana Republican Party said Tuesday that going to all-mail voting in November would “limit options for Montanans who prefer to vote in-person on election day,” and that they should have the option to go to the polls.

McCue said county election officials would like to know now whether they’ll have the power to choose an all-mail election or one with polling stations.

Either course involves detailed, extensive plans, and the counties want to be able to plan for one option, rather than two, she said.

“If we are looking at a mail ballot election, that means more envelopes, that means increased capacity to process mail ballots, that means looking at if postage if covered or not on return envelopes,” she said. “And those are things that take time to plan for.”

Montana allows any voter to request absentee ballots, which are mailed, and about 70 percent of Montana voters choose that option. McCue noted that if her county chose to go to all-mail ballots, they’d still need to print one-third more ballots sooner and get them in the mail on Oct. 9.
If counties are required to keep polls open, they need to get started on recruiting and training more election judges, finding additional polling spots, and notifying voters of any changes, McCue added.

Glasgow School District Releases Draft Re-opening Plan

Tuesday, July 28th 2020

Valley County Confirms 8th COVID-19 Case

Saturday, July 25th 2020

Valley County's eighth positive COVID-19 case has now been confirmed by the Valley County Health Department and FMDH.

Case 8 is a female in her 70s who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. Exposure is from an unknown source. This individual is symptomatic.

This is the third active case in the county with five previous cases now classified as "recovered."

Employee Of Roosevelt County Health Department Contracts COVID-19

Friday, July 24th 2020

Press Release from the Fort Peck Tribes/Roosevelt County/IHS Covid-19 Task force:

Greetings County Residents:

Due to an employee of the Roosevelt County Health Department contracting Covid-19, the Health department is currently closed. They do not have members at the office to answer phones so messages will take time to get answered. If county citizens have concerns about their personal health or possibility of exposure, we ask you to heed the initial recommendations: Please contact your personal healthcare provider with your concerns. Your primary healthcare provider will determine if testing is encouraged or necessary and how they wish to see you for such testing.

We appreciate this is a sudden and odd situation and wish to assure you that arrangements are being made by Health Department staff working remotely to return to normal operations as soon as possible. The task force will continue to update through this forum. Requests by media agencies may go to the County Public Information Officer or initiated by message to this group.

Valley County Reports Three Active COVID-19 Cases

Thursday, July 23rd 2020

Valley County has THREE active COVID-19 cases as of 3 pm on 7.22.2020. Thursday at 10 am the state COVID map will show 3 active cases, 4 recovered, 7 total.

Case 7 is a male in his 60s who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. The individual is a named contact to a positive case and does not have symptoms.

Governor Bullock Announces State Will Expand Surveillance Testing For COVID-19 In Partnership With Montana State University

Thursday, July 23rd 2020

MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock Wednesday announced the state will soon be able to expand surveillance COVID-19 testing for critical front-line health care personnel, essential workers and other groups thanks to a partnership with Montana State University.

“Surveillance testing of asymptomatic individuals is a powerful tool in helping slow the spread of the virus in our Montana communities,” Bullock said. “Montana State University has been an enthusiastic partner in helping find a Montana solution to our testing capacity and I am incredibly grateful for their partnership as we work together to protect the health of Montanans.”

Montana State University’s researchers will begin the surveillance testing next week, with a capability of testing 500 people per day. The Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) will determine what Montana populations need to be tested for surveillance and then will ship the samples to a designated laboratory at MSU.

“As the state’s land-grant university, this kind of service and outreach to the people of Montana is what we are called to do,” said Montana State University President Waded Cruzado. “Montana State University’s researchers have poured their creative energies into this project as well as other important endeavors that benefit the communities we serve.

Montana State University will use four qPCR machines to do the surveillance testing at the direction of DPHHS.

“This initiative is a step in the right direction and will serve us well in helping to detect the virus among asymptomatic groups of people so that we can take quick action to stop the virus from spreading,” said Montana National Guard Major General Matthew Quinn, who is leading the Governor’s Coronavirus Task Force.

Governor Bullock also announced that the state has finalized a contract with a reference lab, MAKO Medical in North Carolina, to begin processing an anticipated 1,000 tests each day from Montana. The state will take a measured approach to ensure a reasonable turn-around time in receiving back test results.

Verizon-Cellular Plus To Give Away Free Backpacks With School Supplies On Saturday

Wednesday, July 22nd 2020

Verizon-Cellular Plus in Glasgow will be giving away free backpacks filled with school supplies this Saturday, July 25th, from 10 am to noon.

“We are excited to be able to give back to our local community and help students kick off the school year with a brand-new backpack,” stated President, Adam Kimmet. “Although we are not sure what the school year will look like, we know there will be learning taking place and kids will need school supplies. We would like to help make it a little easier for families to afford these essential supplies so that students can start off the school year prepared and confident.”

The Verizon-Cellular Plus Backpack to School program incorporates employees, customers, and their vendor partners. They organized an internal employee donation program and are also accepting donations from their guests in the stores to help as many families as possible. Donations will be staying local so each backpack that is donated at a specific location will be distributed to children in that same area.

No purchase is necessary to receive a backpack, but a child must be present with an adult to claim their free backpack. There are a limited number available and will be distributed while supplies last. The Verizon-Cellular Plus team members who are distributing the free backpacks will be wearing masks and gloves and will be following social distancing guidelines.

Cellular Plus is located at 54147 US-2, next to Newton Motors in Glasgow.

Cellular Plus is a Verizon authorized retailer, founded in 1998, and headquartered in Billings, MT.

6th COVID-19 Case Confirmed in Valley County

Tuesday, July 21st 2020

Valley County Public Health Department and Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital confirm the sixth positive case of COVID-19 in Valley County. Valley County has two active cases currently.

Valley County Unemployment Rate At 4.7% For June

Tuesday, July 21st 2020

MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock Friday announced Montana’s unemployment rate dropped 1.9 percentage points to 7.1% in June. Montana’s unemployment rate has steadily improved since April and is well below the national rate of 11.1% for June.

“With nearly 21,000 more Montanans returning to work last month, it’s clear our early efforts put Montana on a path toward economic recovery,” Governor Bullock said. “As cases rise again in Montana and threaten our health and the economic progress we’ve made thus far, we must recommit to working together to fight this virus by wearing a mask and taking other precautions to protect vulnerable Montanans, avoid overwhelming our healthcare system, and support businesses as they try to keep their doors open.”

Montana has the 8th lowest unemployment rate in the country.

Total employment, which includes both payroll workers and the self-employed, increased by 20,992 over the month, setting a record for the most jobs gained in any single month since the data series began in 1976. Total employment has added over 39,000 jobs in the last two months, but employment levels remain roughly 21,000 jobs (4%) below the pre-COVID-19 recession peak.

Payroll employment posted gains of 16,100 jobs over the month, with the leisure and hospitality sector leading gains by adding 5,800 jobs over the month. Healthcare and retail trade also added over 2,000 jobs each. Montana has added roughly 35,000 payroll jobs since April.

Prices rebounded in June, with the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increasing by 0.6% after three months of price declines. Gasoline prices were the primary cause of inflation, increasing by 12.3% over the month. The index for all items less food and energy, also called core inflation, rose by 0.2%, remaining far below inflation targets. Low inflation suggests continued monetary and fiscal policy would not have adverse effects on prices.

The unemployment rate for area counties:

Valley County- 4.7%
Phillips County- 6%
Richland County- 8.7%
Sheridan County- 5.9%
Roosevelt County- 7.8%

Fort Peck Summer Theater Presents Fractured Fairy Tales

Monday, July 20th 2020

Despite the cancellation of the regular season, Fort Peck Summer Theatre is pleased to continue the touring Theatre for Young Audiences program with this summer’s production of Fractured Fairy Tales.

Written and arranged by FPST Artistic Director Andy Meyers, classic fairy tales are turned upside down with unexpected twists, unlikely heroes and a host of zany characters! This fast-paced collection of stories is sure to leave audiences of all ages laughing, while the timeless lessons of friendship, reaching goals and acceptance from the traditional fairy tales still shine.

Fractured Fairy Tales will be directed by Performing Arts Camp Director Megan Wiltshire, whose many FPST credits include directing the hit productions of Peter Pan, Grease and Disney’s Tarzan.

The cast features siblings Bridget Wright and Ian Wright.

Theatre for Young Audience (TYA) is designed to educate and enlighten youth, with a goal to bring visibility, excitement and awareness about the performing arts. Approximately 40 minutes in length, TYA productions are perfect for the entire family: geared towards children, but sure to engage all ages while it encourages and fosters a love for theatre. Admission for these performances is FREE.

Fractured Fairy Tales tour schedule is as follows. Please continue to check the exact locations of these performance, as some will be moving to outside spaces to accommodate social-distancing protocols.
• Tuesday, July 21: 2:00pm at Glasgow Library, Glasgow
• Wednesday, July 22: 2:00pm at The Rex Theatre, Scobey
• Tuesday, July 23: 2:00pm at Phillips County Museum, Malta
• Saturday, July 25: 10:00am at Fort Peck Interpretive Center, Fort Peck

5th Positive Case Of COVID-19 In Valley County

Sunday, July 19th 2020

Valley County, Montana): Valley County Public Health Department and Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital confirm the fifth positive case of COVID-19 in Valley County. Valley County has one active case at this time.

Case #5 is a female in her 60s who is symptomatic and is isolating at home. The source of the virus is unknown with suspected exposure from travel outside the county. Contact tracing is complete.

Valley County Public Health Department is following up directly with all individuals who have had close contact with the active case and are at risk of infection. All close contacts have been notified and will be tested for COVID-19.

Take the following steps to aid in the contact tracing process and protect yourself and your family:
• Please have your voicemail set up and cleared so that you can receive messages.
• Through contact tracing, Valley County Public Health Department will ask close contacts to be tested.
• Limit your contact with others. Avoid large group gatherings. Wear a mask when social distancing is
difficult.
• Monitor yourself and family members for the development of COVID-19 symptoms, including a
new/sudden dry cough, shortness of breath, body aches, sore throat, fatigue and a fever of 100.5 or
greater. If you are experiencing these symptoms, contact your healthcare provider.
• Continue to practice COVID-19 precautions, including staying home when you are sick, monitoring for
symptoms, washing your hands, and cover your cough.
• Vulnerable populations, including those over 65 and those with compromised immune systems, should
continue to stay at home.

Governor Bullock Orders Flags Displayed At Half-Staff To Honor The Life Of The Late John Lews

Sunday, July 19th 2020

Gov. Steve Bullock ordered that all flags in the state of Montana to be displayed at half-staff on Saturday to honor the life of the late Rep. John R. Lewis of Georgia who died on Friday.

The lawmaker had been suffering from Stage IV pancreatic cancer since December. He was 80.

"Representative John Lewis' life of public service stands witness to America's highest ideals," wrote Bullock in his proclamation honoring Lewis. "I call on all Montanans to honor his passing by rededicating ourselves to the causes he worked so tirelessly to advance; the civil rights and equal justice for all Americans, regardless of the color of their skin or the circumstances of their birth."

Lewis was a civil rights icon and an original Freedom Rider, many of the causes he championed around segregation, discrimination and injustice in the Deep South are reverberating today in the Black Lives Matter movement. Lewis helped organize the March on Washington in 1963 alongside Martin Luther King Jr.

John Lewis' mugshot after an arrest in Nashville during efforts to desegregate lunch counters in the city during the 1960s.
John Lewis' mugshot after an arrest in Nashville during efforts to desegregate lunch counters in the city during the 1960s. (Photo: Metro Nashville Police Department via AP)

Lewis was a U.S. Representative for Georgia's 5th congressional district. He served 17 terms in the House since 1987.

Strommen Found Guilty

Friday, July 17th 2020

Former Valley County Undersheriff Luke Strommen was found guilty on a Felony Charge of Sexual Intercourse Without Consent during a jury trial that wrapped up Friday afternoon in Glasgow.

Strommen pleaded not guilty to the charge in January of 2019. The trial was slated for March of this year but was cancelled and rescheduled for July 13th.

Strommen is accused of having sexual relations with a girl who was 14 at the time and court documents state the relationship continued for 17 months. Court documents allege the relationship started in September of 2009 and lasted through January of 2011.

He was arrested immediately with no bond. He will remain incarcerated until sentencing.

Sentencing will be held August 28th with Judge John Larson handling the sentence in the case.

Strommen could be sentenced to a maximum of life in prison or a term not less than 4 years.

The trial started on Monday and attorneys for both the defense and prosecution wrapped up their closing statements just before noon on Friday.


Message From Glasgow School Superintendent Wade Sundby Regarding School Reopening

Friday, July 17th 2020

July 16, 2020 Glasgow Students, Staff, Parents and Community, I hope everyone is having a fun and relaxing summer! We at the Glasgow School District wanted to provide an update to our students, parents, staff and community as to the current status of plans for reopening school buildings beginning August 26th.

We are working to develop a plan that balances the best opportunities for the education of our students and as well as keeping staff and students as safe as possible during this time. The Office of Public Instruction, the Governor’s office, Montana School Boards Association (MTSBA), and many other educational and health organizations have provided guidance concerning reopening schools. The guidance from these organizations does not contain mandates and/or directives for schools but rather serves as recommendations for local schools to consider as we work to finalize our plans for the 2020-2021 school year. We have formed a "reopening schools team" that includes faculty, parents, students, teachers, administrators and board members in our district to meet frequently to construct a plan for reopening as we navigate the complexity of issues related to the day-to-day operations of school.

We have emailed a survey to parents and staff regarding the end of the 2019-20 school year and asking about the comfortability of reopening for the 2020-21 school year. If you did not receive that survey, please contact me at the email below and I will forward it to you. Once we have this plan as complete as possible it will be approved by our school board as well as the Valley County Health Department and we will announce it to the students, parents, and community.

We are in constant digital meetings with colleagues and educational agencies to get further guidance on the many facets to consider. Our goal is to reopen school with an increased awareness and diligence placed on cleaning and effective sanitation practices. There will be adjustments that will need to be made in order to reopen our school buildings. School building openings may include full attendance, blended attendance with distance learning, or distance learning as well as other accommodations/adjustments to ensure a safe and successful reopening.
Our goal is to have a plan approved by the beginning of August. We appreciate your continued patience and support throughout this time of the unknown. It seems like our guidance changes hourly, daily, and weekly. Please understand that the plan we come up with may change as we navigate this ever evolving situation. Our top priority will continue to be what is best for our students’ education and safety for all involved.

If you have any questions you can contact me at wsundby@mail.glasgow.k12.mt.us or via phone 406-228-2406. Respectfully, Wade O. Sundby Superintendent

Valley County To Hold Public Hearing

Friday, July 17th 2020

Valley County will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, August 04, 2020, at 5:30 p.m. in the office of the Valley County Commissioners located at 501 East Court Street, Glasgow, Montana. The purpose of the hearing is to obtain public comments regarding the County’s overall community development needs (public facilities, economic development, and housing needs), including the needs of low and moderate-income persons. Valley County will also seek the views of citizens on the activities that should be undertaken to meet the identified needs and their relative priority.

This fall, the Valley County Commissioners may apply for funding from the Montana Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program (federal funding administered by the Montana Department of Commerce) and other state and federal funding sources to deal with local housing, public facilities, or other community needs. The Commissioners want Valley County residents to offer their comments or suggestions on the County’s needs and the type of projects or programs which should be considered for development. Comments may be given orally at the hearing or submitted in writing by Monday, August 03, 2020 at 5:00 p.m.

Anyone who would like more information or wants to submit suggestions should contact the Valley County Commissioners at (406) 228-6219 or vccomm@valleycountymt.gov.

Governor Bullock Announces Distribution Of $75 Million In State Funding For School Districts

Friday, July 17th 2020

MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock today directed $75 million from the Coronavirus Relief Fund to Montana K-12 schools to cover expenses incurred due to COVID-19 and take precautions to keep students and staff safe this fall.

“We know that our schools, along with teachers, administrators and parents, are tackling so much to prepare for students to return to some normalcy this fall. Things will certainly look a lot different in hallways and classrooms, but health and safety is our number one priority,” Governor Bullock said. “We must provide schools with every opportunity available to ensure that they can adequately prepare for the upcoming school year and provide all Montana students with a quality education in a safe manner.”

"The Governor's recognition that Montana K-12 schools need to cover expenses resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic to function safely, through Coronavirus Relief Funding, is appreciated by our school leaders. Using the research of the 'AASA/ASBO Cost of Reopening Schools' national study led to $75 million in CRF distribution to our K-12 schools,” Kirk Miller, executive Director of the School Administrators of Montana said. “SAM, and administrators all across the state, appreciate the Governor's use of the study for determining that allocation, and further appreciate the efficiency and flexibility in the use of the funding to meet the needs of their schools.”

Montana schools were allocated $41 million through the Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief Fund from the U.S. Department of Education. Education advocates requested Governor Bullock direct additional funds from the state Coronavirus Relief Funds to ensure schools can take appropriate precautions to reopen this fall and provide adequate remote learning opportunities for students.

A total of $10 million will be reserved to cover incremental transportation costs related to the pandemic and will be available after transportation budgets for school districts are adopted this fall.

The remaining $65 million will be distributed based on the fiscal year 2021 budgeted ANB of each district. The Governor’s Office determined the amount of funding based on a per student funding level identified in a national study that takes into account costs for transportation, personal protective equipment, cleaning and disinfectant, and incremental staffing. Governor Bullock will also allocate an additional amount of Coronavirus Relief Funds to accredited private schools. All funds distributed to schools must be used for COVID-19 related costs.

Governor Bullock has also authorized a bulk purchase of personal protective equipment such as masks, gloves, thermometers, and sanitizer that will be distributed to interested school districts.

Here is a list of Valley County School Districts with their share of the state funding:

Valley Frazer Elem $40,600
Valley Frazer H S $13,813
Valley Glasgow K-12 $362,474
Valley Hinsdale Elem $20,509
Valley Hinsdale H S $11,301
Valley Lustre Elem $20,509
Valley Nashua K-12 $45,205
Valley Opheim K-12 $13,813

Strommen Trial Continues In Glasgow

Thursday, July 16th 2020

Former Valley County Undersheriff Luke Strommen continues to be tried at a jury trial in Glasgow as he faces a Felony Charge of Sexual Intercourse Without Consent.

Jury selection took place on Monday with opening statements held on Monday afternoon. As of Thursday morning the prosecution continued to call witnesses in their case against Strommen. The defense has yet to call their first witness in the case as of Thursday morning.

The presiding Judge in the case, Judge John Larson of Missoula, mentioned Thursday that their is the possibility the trial could continue into the weekend.

Strommen pleaded not guilty to the charge in January of 2019. The trial was slated for March of this year but was cancelled and rescheduled for July 13th.

Strommen is accused of having sexual relations with a girl who was 14 at the time and court documents state the relationship continued for 17 months. Court documents allege the relationship started in September of 2009 and lasted through January of 2011.

If Strommen is found guilty he could be imprisoned for a term of not less than 4 years or more than 100 years.

Additional $600 Unemployment Benefit Ends July 25; Other CARES Act Benefits Continue through December

Thursday, July 16th 2020

HELENA – The Montana Department of Labor & Industry today reminds Montanans that the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) program ends the week of July 25, 2020. Established through the passage of the federal CARES Act, the temporary program provided an additional $600 per week to anyone receiving benefits under regular or pandemic-enhanced Unemployment Insurance (UI) programs.

The CARES Act specifies a July 31 termination date for FPUC payments. However, since a UI benefit week in Montana runs from Sunday to Saturday, the last full week to which the FPUC enhancement applies is benefit week ending July 25. After that date, regular UI weekly benefit amounts will be based on state law, and Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) payments will be based on other requirements in the CARES Act.

“Of the over $700 million in UI benefits paid since the beginning of the pandemic, roughly two-thirds of that amount is attributable to the extra $600 weekly FPUC payment. The elimination of the FPUC payment will definitely be felt in households of jobless workers and across their communities. We will be closely monitoring developments at the federal level when Congress returns from recess next week.” Acting Commissioner Brenda Nordlund said. “It is possible the FPUC payment could be extended at a lower amount or Congress could take a completely different tack on how best to continue support unemployed workers and the economy, in general, considering the COVID-19 numbers being reported across the country.”

Other provisions of the CARES Act do not expire until December 26, 2020. This includes Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), which provides an extra 13 weeks of benefits to persons who exhaust traditional benefits, and Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA), which provides up to 46 weeks of benefits to those who are self-employed and some others who have not traditionally qualified for state benefits. Also, Montana is offering an additional 13 weeks of Extended Benefits for eligible individuals who have exhausted both their regular UI benefits and PEUC benefits.

DLI continues to encourage anyone who believes they may be eligible for UI to file a claim online at MontanaWorks.gov, or at mtpua.mt.gov for those that fall under the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance eligibility guidelines. Those with technical, eligibility, or benefits questions are encouraged to view the COVID-19 resource website at dli.mt.gov/covid-19. A variety of information for both Montana workers and employers is available and resources to help claimants navigate the unemployment process.

COVID-19 Testing Available Today In Glasgow

Wednesday, July 15th 2020

COVID-19 Testing Available Today In Glasgow:

There are two time slots available, no appointment is necessary.

• Drive-thru the NE MT Fairgrounds between 11am and 1:30pm, or
• Walk-thru downtown Glasgow (by D&G) between 5:30pm and 7:30pm.

Community Snapshot testing provides valuable information about asymptomatic community spread of the virus for specific points in time. Even if you attended the previous Community Snapshot testing event, we urge you to attend again on 7/15/20.

Governor Bullock Issues Directive Requiring Face Coverings For Counties Currently Experiencing Four Or More Active Cases Of COVID-19.

Wednesday, July 15th 2020

MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock today issued a directive requiring face coverings in certain indoor spaces and for certain organized outdoor activities in counties currently experiencing four or more active cases of COVID-19 to slow the spread of the virus in Montana.

Governor Bullock issued the directive to require businesses, government offices and other indoor spaces open to the public to ensure that employees, contractors, volunteers, customers, and other members of the public wear a face mask that covers their mouth and nose while remaining inside these spaces. The directive also requires face coverings at organized outdoor activities of 50 or more people, where social distancing is not possible or is not observed.

“Many Montanans answered the call to mask up – a call that came from our hospitals, nurses, and doctors, our vibrant small business community, our frontline workers, and our high-risk neighbors,” Governor Bullock said. “I thank all of those who take seriously their personal responsibility and their role in stopping COVID-19. But we need even more Montanans, and the visitors who come here, to mask up.”

The directive is in line with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommendation that people wear cloth face coverings in public and when around people outside one’s household. Additionally, the CDC released a study this week concluding that “mandating the use of face coverings” in a salon in Missouri likely mitigated the spread of COVID-19 and recommended consideration of broader policies requiring face coverings. In the last month, Montana’s active cases of COVID-19 have risen from 55 to more than 1,000.

“There’s no reason this needs to be political, because COVID-19 isn’t political. Instead, this is about being a Montanan and being supportive of those around us. Montanans need to not only feel safe, but be safe to continue supporting small businesses like restaurants, breweries, clothing stores, bookshops, and more. And Montanans need to be healthy to work. Mom and pop shops in Montana often have two employees: Mom and Pop themselves. If they get COVID-19, they can’t keep their business running,” continued Governor Bullock.

The directive does not require face coverings in counties with three or fewer active cases or for children under 5, though face coverings are strongly encouraged in both cases. Other exceptions include children under 2, while eating or drinking at businesses that sell food or drinks, during activities that make face coverings unsafe (like strenuous physical exercise or swimming), while giving speeches or performances in front of a socially distanced audience, while receiving medical care or for people with a preexisting condition that would make wearing a face covering unsafe.

Under the directive, businesses, government offices and other publicly operating spaces will provide face coverings for employees and volunteers, and post signs stating that face coverings are required for people 5 and older.

Businesses, other indoor spaces open to the public and sponsors of organized outdoor activities may also deny entry, refuse service or ask any person to leave if they refuse to wear a face covering. If necessary, they may rely on peace officers to enforce the state’s trespassing laws if a person refuses to wear a face covering and refuses to leave the premises.

Local public health agencies and law enforcement should focus their enforcement of this directive on education, providing warnings and education about the risk of transmission, while reserving the imposition of penalties, trespass enforcement, and other formal enforcement mechanisms for only the most egregious, repeat violations that put the public at risk.

The directive goes into effect immediately and expires at the end of the declared statewide state of emergency.

Border Between U.S. And Canada To Remain Closed Until At Least August 21st

Wednesday, July 15th 2020

The border between Canada and the U.S. is set to remain closed to all non-essential travel until at least August 21, Canadian network CTV is reporting.

Talks have been ongoing between the two countries, with the current closure set to expire on July 21. Justin Trudeau and Donald Trump had a call yesterday to discuss the situation and the Canadian PM said afterwards that his administration was “going to continue to work hard to keep Canadians safe and to keep our economies flowing.”

Government figures in the U.S. have been petitioning Canada to re-open the border, which has been closed since March, with an open letter recently penned by 29 members of Congress asking for “a comprehensive framework for phased reopening.”


However, Canada has maintained the health of its citizens is a priority, and with coronavirus cases spiking in the U.S., the one-month extension to the closure was somewhat predictable. Confirmed infections in the U.S. have now reached nearly 3.5 million, with close to 140,000 deaths, while Canada by contrast has close to 110,000 cases and under 9,000 deaths.

Garfield County Confirms Eight Additional Positive COVID-19 Cases

Wednesday, July 15th 2020

PRESS RELEASE: Garfield County Confirms Eight Additional Positive COVID-19 Cases

Garfield County, Montana -- Garfield County Public Health (GCPH) has confirmed eight additional cases of COVID-19 within Garfield County on Tuesday, July 14, 2020. Total case count for the area is now at nine.

As contact tracing continues for each case, GCPH would like to strongly reiterate the importance of a cleared voicemail as well as prompt response back from members of the public identified as close contacts.

GCPH defines a close contact involving COVID-19 as any individual who was within 6 feet of an infected person for at least 15 minutes. For symptomatic patients, this timeline starts 3 days before illness onset. For asymptomatic patients, this time period will be 3 days prior to positive specimen collection.
These individuals will be notified and asked to be tested for COVID-19.

Residents can help with the ongoing efforts to slow the virus spread in the following ways:

• Limit your direct contact with others by social distancing, avoid large gatherings and wear a mask in situations where social distancing is hard to accomplish.

• Know the symptoms of COVID-19 and monitor for their development. They include a fever, dry cough, shortness of breath, body aches, sore throat, loss of taste/smell and fatigue. Local symptoms have also included a runny nose, headaches, nausea and/or diarrhea.

• If you experience these symptoms, even if you have not been identified as a close contact, contact your health provider. Do not enter a facility prior to making contact.

Strommen Trial Begins Today With Jury Selection

Monday, July 13th 2020

Former Valley County Undersheriff Luke Strommen will go on trial today in Glasgow as he faces a Felony Charge of Sexual Intercourse Without Consent.

A total of 44 jurors were called to the Valley County Courthouse this morning for jury selection. The trial is expected to get underway immediately after jury selection.

Strommen pleaded not guilty to the charge in January of 2019. The trial was slated for March of this year but was cancelled and rescheduled for July 13th.

Strommen is accused of having sexual relations with a girl who was 14 at the time and court documents state the relationship continued for 17 months. Court documents allege the relationship started in September of 2009 and lasted through January of 2011.

If Strommen is found guilty he could be imprisoned for a term of not less than 4 years or more than 100 years.

Former Valley County Resident Continues Lawsuit Against Valley County Sheriff's Office But Drops Portion That Included Former Deputy Luke Strommen

Monday, July 13th 2020

A lawsuit filed by a former resident of Valley County against the Valley County Sheriff's Office and former Deputy Luke Strommen will continue but without the portion that included Strommen.

Former Opheim resident Elena Salinas filed a lawsuit in federal court in December of 2019 alleging that Deputy Strommen sexually assaulted her at her home in December of 2017.

The lawsuit accused Strommen of coming to her house under the pretense of conducting law enforcement business as an undersheriff for the county and proceeded to physically and sexually assult her.
The lawsuit goes on to allege that the Valley County Sheriff’s Office was liable for Strommen’s actions since they had employed him in the first place. Salinas alleges in the filing that VCSO was guilty of negligent hiring and negligent retention, since the office either “knew or should have known” about Strommen’s past actions of sexual assault towards women and children. It further alleges that the VCSO was responsible for the supervision of Strommen and as such is liable for his actions.

But in a filing last week, Elena Salinas dropped the portion of the lawsuit that included Luke Strommen. The document states that the Plaintiffs' complaint against defendant Luke Strommen is dismissed with prejudice with each party to bear their own costs and attorney's fees.

Salinas though will continue with the portion of the lawsuit that includes Valley County. A trial originally had been set for June of 2021.

Governor Bullock Statement On Increasing Number Of Cases Of COVID-19

Monday, July 13th 2020

Governor Steve Bullock had this statement regarding the increasing number of cases of COVID-19. The statement was issued July 10th.

The new daily highs we're seeing in COVID-19 cases concern me deeply. Active contact tracing, testing, and adequate hospital capacity and supplies allow us to manage the virus at its current level in Montana – but if this trend in new cases continues, I will seriously consider reimplementing some public health restrictions.

We need to have a healthy workforce and a public that feels safe for the economy to do well and for a successful reopening. Montanans need to avoid large gatherings and wear a mask while in public. Many of these cases are preventable if this guidance is followed. I know Montanans are tired of four months of COVID-19, but we can’t let that fatigue allow us to let our guard down.

Diamond Rio Concert, Northeast Montana Fair Rodeo and Demolition Derby Officially Cancelled

Thursday, July 9th 2020

The Northeast Montana Fair Concert Partners made it official this week, by voting to cancel the Diamond Rio Concert planned for the Northeast Montana Fair. On Wednesday the Valley County Commissioners voted to cancel the Northeast Montana Fair Rodeo and Demolition Derby. Haylie Shipp has the story:


https://soundcloud.com/kltz-glasgow/haylie-fair-1

FMDH And Valley County Health Announce Community COVID-19 Testing On June 25th Resulted In 100% Negative Tests

Thursday, July 9th 2020

(Valley County, Montana): Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital and the Valley County Health Department are happy to report that 100% of the asymptomatic COVID-19 tests run at the Community Snapshot testing event at the NE MT Fairgrounds on 06/25/20 are NEGATIVE.

We encourage you to attend the next free Community Snapshot testing event on Wednesday, 7/15/20. There are two time slots available, no appointment is necessary.

• Drive-thru the NE MT Fairgrounds between 11am and 1:30pm, or
• Walk-thru downtown Glasgow (by D&G) between 5:30pm and 7:30pm.

Community Snapshot testing provides valuable information about asymptomatic community spread of the virus for specific points in time. Even if you attended the previous Community Snapshot testing event, we urge you to attend again on 7/15/20.

National Weather Service Reports From Tuesday's Thunderstorms

Wednesday, July 8th 2020

Peak wind gusts of 89 mph in Malta, 54 mph in Glasgow and 83 mph at St. Marie (1 mile ENE).

4:40 p.m. Several trees blow over in Malta Cemetery.

5:24 p.m. 1 mile north of Saco: Wind pushed harrow 200 feet and picked up a grain bin and carried it over a wind break. Wind also carried a few bulls, some other buildings, and a junk pile 300 yards to a nearby lake. Damage to siding, gutters, and roofing, along with several trees toppled. garden shed destroyed. Time estimated from radar. From social media.

5:50 p.m. 1 mile west of Duck Creek: Public posted photo to social media showing a house with the roof completely removed.

Tornado warning 4:53 for East Central Phillips, West Central Valley County T-storm capable of a tornado

Supreme Court Deals Blow To Keystone Pipeline

Tuesday, July 7th 2020

The U.S. Supreme Court has handed another setback to the Keystone XL pipeline from Canada by keeping in place a lower court ruling that blocked a key permit for the project.

Canadian company TC Energy needs the permit to continue building the long-disputed pipeline from Canada across U.S. rivers and streams. Without it, the project that has been heavily promoted by President Donald Trump faces more delays just as work on it had finally begun this year following years of courtroom battles.

Monday's order also put on hold a earlier court ruling out of Montana as it pertains to other oil and gas pipelines across the nation.

That's a sliver of good news for an industry that just suffered two other blows - Sunday's cancellation of the $8 billion Atlantic Coast gas pipeline in the Southeast and on Monday a ruling that shut down the Dakota Access oil pipeline in North Dakota.

In the Keystone case, an April ruling from U.S. District Judge Brian Morris in Montana had threatened to delay not just Keystone but more than 70 pipeline projects across the U.S., and add as much as $2 billion in costs, according to industry representatives.

Morris agreed with environmentalists who contended a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers program was allowing companies to skirt responsibility for damage done to water bodies.

But the Trump administration and industry attorneys had argued the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers permit program, in place since the 1970s, was functioning properly when it was cancelled by Morris over concerns about endangered species being harmed during pipeline construction.

TC Energy spokesman Terry Cunha said the company is not giving up on Keystone, but it will delay large portions of the 1,200-mile (1,900-kilometer) oil sands pipeline.

An attorney for one of the environmental groups involved in the case called Monday's order a major victory in the fight against Keystone. But he acknowledged the plaintiffs had hoped to hamper oil and gas projects nationwide.

"Our focus was originally on Keystone, so we're very happy the court order ensures it can't move forward under this unlawful permit," said Jared Margolis, an attorney with the Center for Biological Diversity.

Grobel Scholarship Recipients Announced

Tuesday, July 7th 2020

The Grobel Scholarships, each in the amount of $2,500, are awarded each year to graduates of Valley County high schools who are engaged in a course of study leading to a degree in nursing or other medical related field. For information on the 2021 scholarships, please contact Jessica Pehlke at First Community Bank.Recipients of 2020 Grobel Scholarships are:

Elizabeth Page
Sophia Koessl
Brooke Westby



Red Cross Will Test For Coronavirus Antibodies From Donated Blood At Blood Drive In Glasgow On Tuesday And Wednesday

Monday, July 6th 2020

The American Red Cross will have Blood Drives Tues. & Wed. July 7th & 8th at the Glasgow VFW. Tuesday is from 11a.m. – 5:30p.m., Wednesday is from 9a.m. – 2p.m. This is by appointment only, call 406-263-0321 to schedule yours.

For a limited time the American Red Cross will be testing for coronavirus antibodies from blood, plasma, and platelet donations.

This test will locate whether or not someone has the antibodies that form to fight off the corona virus infection.

The results of your test are available after roughly a week after your donation through the blood donor app or online. If you do decide to donate there are some new requirements from the CDC. Donors are required to wear a mask while donating…practice social distancing and have a temperature check done before you enter the blood drive or center.

The results of the antibody test will not show whether or not someone has the illness and the Red Cross recommends anyone who is not feeling well to postpone any donations and get tested until they are symptom-free for at least 28 days.

Tax Deadline Approaching July 15th

Monday, July 6th 2020

With the July 15 deadline for federal and state individual income tax filing and payments approaching, the Montana Department of Revenue reminds those with difficulty paying their state income taxes that they can design and request payment plans online.

Taxpayers can request a payment plan by creating an account and logging into the department’s TransAction Portal (TAP) at tap.dor.mt.gov.

“We understand many Montanans are facing financial stresses right now, so we want to work with taxpayers to find payment options that work for them,” said Gene Walborn, director of the Montana Department of Revenue.

The department will consider the requests on a case-by-case basis.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, both federal and state income tax filing deadlines were extended to July 15 from the usual deadline of April 15. Montana taxpayers may receive an additional automatic extension for filing their returns, but the payments of 2019 income taxes are still due July 15.
For more information call (406) 444-6964 or email DORcollections@mt.gov.

Northeast Montana Fair Commission Discusses Future Of 2020 Fair

Friday, July 3rd 2020

The Northeast Montana Fair Commission met on Thursday evening in a special meeting to discuss the future of the 2020 Northeast Montana Fair.

This years fair is a month away and due to COVID-19 there was speculation on whether there would actually be a fair this summer.

Haylie Shipp of Kltz/Mix-93 has the story!

https://soundcloud.com/kltz-glasgow/haylie-fair

Governor Bullock Releases Plan For Reopening Schools In Montana

Friday, July 3rd 2020

HELENA – Governor Steve Bullock and Lt. Governor Mike Cooney Thursday released the Governor’s Plan for Reopening Safe and Healthy Schools for Montana to provide flexible guidance for public schools to prepare to offer in-person instruction in the fall.

“We are acutely aware of the role played by in-person teaching, not only in the students’ lives, but also in the lives of the entire family. Public education has shaped who we are today, and we want to make certain that our children have the same experience. This is why we’ve made the safe reopening of our public schools a top priority,” Governor Bullock and Lt. Gov. Cooney wrote in the plan. “Noting the uniqueness of every school district in Montana, our goal for this document is not to be prescriptive, but to provide effective, flexible guidelines to all schools in hopes that we can safely resume in-person instruction in the fall.”

“Keeping each person in our community safe as we re-open schools is a solemn responsibility. As a member of my own district's back to school team, I appreciate the guidance given in this document, which will help frame our plans to return safely to school,” Sharon Carroll, a teacher in Ekalaka said. “Engaging local public health authorities and local school district leadership teams while using the resources, procedures, and protocols shared in the Governor's Plan will assist teams in developing a Health and Safety Plan unique to each district. As a teacher, a rancher, and a former chair of Montana's Board of Public Education, I have often observed Montana grit. We've got this, Montana.”

“MFPE appreciates the Governor’s inclusion of our members throughout this process. MFPE members will rely on this guidance as they continue planning to safely reopen schools in the fall,” MFPE President Amanda Curtis said.

Governor Bullock tasked Lt. Gov. Cooney with bringing together experts including superintendents, principals, teachers, union representatives, and public health officials to develop the plan based on insight and firsthand knowledge of challenges schools are facing. Governor Bullock has authority to close schools during the emergency and provided guidance reviewed by health experts to ensure schools have the tools they need to reopen as safely as possible this fall.

The plan acknowledges the critical role in-person instruction plays in the lives of students and their families. Schools provide students with structure and familiarity and offer socialization and connection. Many families rely on schools for nutritious meals, counseling, and childcare. Additionally, staff and teachers who spend in person time with students are able to identify signs of child abuse or neglect.

Governor Bullock and Lt. Gov. Cooney are encouraging schools to consider the guidance provided and develop their own Health and Safety plans to reopen. While every district is unique, school districts should consult their local public health officials to address the specific needs of each school and take every possible safety measure to keep students, educators, and staff healthy and safe.

The plan is categorized into three different phases to align with Governor Bullock’s Reopening the Big Sky Plan. Nothing in the guidance prevents a school from taking additional precautions based on their needs.

Each phase has high level guidance for schools and includes more specific protocols and recommendations for each school to consider for their individual plan. The plan also includes best practices related to academics, extracurricular activities, transportation, physical and structural protocols to minimize interactions and crowding, while considering ways to promote the social, emotional, and behavioral health of students.

Some of the highlights encourage schools to consider:
• Accommodations for students, teachers, and staff who are in at risk group
• Occupancy limits that allow for social distancing
• Guidance on traffic flow to avoid crowding in congregational spaces
• Cleaning and disinfecting protocols
• Processes for monitoring students and staff for symptoms and history of exposure
• Producing guidelines in relation to isolation or quarantine if needed
• How to serve meals while minimizing congregation
• Adjusting transportation schedules
• Protocols for sports and other extracurricular activities

A list of comprehensive additional resources is provided for schools including from the Centers for Disease Control, the Office of Public Instruction, and the Montana High School Association.

The full plan is available here: https://covid19.mt.gov/Portals/223/Documents/Education%20Final.pdf?ver=2020-07-02-123418-013

Fireworks Allowed In City Limits Of Glasgow

Thursday, July 2nd 2020

City of Glasgow ordinance does allow for the use of fireworks within the city limits for a time period between July 3rd and July 5th.

During this time, permissible fireworks by be fired, set off, exploded, or discharged within the city limits, but aerial projectiles may not have the ability to exceed 10 feet in air.

The use of fireworks shall be permitted between the hours of 12:30pm and 12:30am each day.

Corp Of Engineers Encourages Outdoor Enthusiasts To Recreate Responsibly And Safely This Holiday Weekend

Thursday, July 2nd 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers encourages outdoor enthusiasts to recreate responsibly and safely this holiday weekend. With reservoirs throughout Oregon near normal capacity and many areas now reopened, Corps officials are expecting increased activity on its water and land-based recreation sites.

"The fourth of July is a great time to celebrate with family and friends, but it can also be one of the most dangerous weekends of the year," said Park Ranger Christie Johnson. "This year, with COVID-19 still a concern and most public holiday events cancelled, we want to make sure that people who come out to recreate understand the risks and are prepared."

Corps park rangers would like to remind the public of the following safety guidelines:

Be prepared. Some parks have limited access to amenities and services so bring your own personal protective supplies including hand sanitizer, soap, water, face mask, and disinfectant wipes. Not all areas are open for camping and parking may be limited so have a plan B.

No fireworks. Do not bring your personal fireworks as use of fireworks is prohibited on Corps land except through special event permits. Additionally, all public fireworks events scheduled at Corps reservoirs have been cancelled this year. Burn bans may be in effect in some areas so plan accordingly.

Be mindful of social distancing. Recreate safely in this COVID-19 environment and stay home if you are exhibiting any cold or flu-like symptoms. Recreate locally and only with those in your household, avoid crowds and gathering in large groups, maintain a six-foot social distance from others and utilize facial coverings as often as possible.

Wear a life jacket! Calm waters and nice weather is when most people drown and nearly 90 percent of the drowning’s that occur at Corps managed waterways involve people not wearing a life jacket. Drowning is preventable. Remember, all activities near water are risky so regardless of your swimming or boating abilities, wear your life jacket. Be alert and aware of posted restrictions around dams because even though the water may look calm, cold water combined with currents circulating underneath the surface and hazardous floating debris can pull you under the water or trap you against log jams. Alcohol and water are a deadly combination so play it safe this Fourth of July and recreate responsibly.

TC Energy Donates To Fort Peck Volunteer Fire Department

Thursday, July 2nd 2020

As a part of its Community Investment Program, TC Energy has generously donated $10,000 to the Town of Fort Peck to help repair Fort Peck Volunteer Fire Department’s Pierce Truck. The 1986 Pierce truck has needed serious valve repairs to be able to pump water in rural areas that do not have access to a pressurized water system and to make the equipment safe for our volunteers to operate. These repairs will help extend the life of the Truck and help protect property in the Town of Fort Peck and surrounding area for years to come.

The Town would like to extend a sincere thank you to TC Energy for being an excellent community partner. The Town would also like to thank Thompson & Sons for doing the repairs, and the Glasgow Fire Department for their guidance and help with getting the trucks tested.

The department currently has thirteen volunteers and is actively looking for new members. If you are local and interested in becoming a volunteer firefighter or for more information please contact the Town Office at 526-3220.

4th Case Of COVID-19 Confirmed In Valley County

Wednesday, July 1st 2020

Valley County, Montana): Valley County Public Health Department and Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital today confirm the fourth positive case of COVID-19 in Valley County. Three cases are active and one is recovered.

Case #4 is a male in his 30s who is not hospitalized and is isolating at home. The case was identified through contact tracing and had been undergoing quarantine. The individual does not have symptoms.

Valley County Public Health Department is following up directly with all individuals who have had close contact with active cases and are at risk of infection. All close contacts will be notified and tested for COVID-19.

Take the following steps to aid in the contact tracing process and protect yourself and your family:
• Please have your voicemail set up and cleared so that you can receive messages.
• Through contact tracing, Valley County Public Health Department will ask close contacts to be tested.
• Limit your contact with others. Avoid large group gatherings. Wear a mask when social distancing is difficult.
• Monitor yourself and family members for the development of COVID-19 symptoms, including a new/sudden dry cough, shortness of breath, body aches, sore throat, fatigue and a fever of 100.5 or greater. If you are experiencing these symptoms, contact your healthcare provider.
• Continue to practice COVID-19 precautions, including staying home when you are sick, monitoring for symptoms, washing your hands, and cover your cough.
• Vulnerable populations, including those over 65 and those with compromised immune systems, should continue to stay at home.

Fort Peck Theater Season Suspended Due To COVID-19

Tuesday, June 30th 2020

With a very heavy heart, Fort Peck Fine Arts Council has determined that the 2020 Fort Peck Summer Theatre season will be suspended. After being contacted and advised by authorities regarding the recent COVID-19 cases in the area, FPFAC is following the health professionals’ recommendations and will not present the summer season.

BOX OFFICE/TICKET INFO:

As our staff and box office prep to accommodate refunds, FPFAC does humbly suggest that audience members might consider the option of keeping unused ticket as a donation.

At this time, Fort Peck is still planning to run the annual Performing Arts Camp as scheduled in August. The directors continue to explore the most efficient ways to follow all guidelines and keep the safety of both campers and staff as the priority.

As the universe allows, Artistic Director Andy Meyers and company plan to return in full force next season. They thank audiences for all the continued patience as they navigated this aberrant year. They find their commitment and passion for the arts in this area has only been heighten by the current circumstances. The summer of 2021 will also debut the long-awaited new stage floor. This is a major technical upgrade for the company and will showcase some of the original aesthetic designs of the historic building.

Hinsdale Ambulance Service Receives $2500 Grant From Northwest Farm Credit Services

Tuesday, June 30th 2020

SPOKANE, Washington?(June 29, 2020) – Northwest Farm Credit Services is proud to award Hinsdale Ambulance Service a $2,500 Rural Community Grant.?

“Hinsdale Volunteer Ambulance Service continues to provide our community, friends, families and the surrounding area with the best patient care possible,” says Gregg Hunter, Hindsdale Ambulance Service Volunteer. “Without the help of generous donations such as the Northwest Farm Credit Services Rural Community Grant, we would struggle to provide this service. Thank you so much for the support you’ve given us, and remember, if you’re ever in our neighborhood, we have your back!”

Northwest FCS is committed to helping rural communities succeed.?In 2019, Northwest FCS committed over $237,000 to?190?projects in rural communities across Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Since the program’s inception in 2007, it has awarded 1,364?grants totaling more than $2.44?million.

This year, Northwest FCS has shifted the focus to support non-profit organizations that are meeting the essential needs of rural communities during the COVID-19 crisis. Since this shifted focus, $345,000 has been donated. More details and the online application are available at northwestfcs.com/ruralgrants.

Northwest FCS is a $13 billion financial cooperative providing financing and related services to farmers, ranchers, agribusinesses, commercial fishermen, timber producers, rural homeowners and crop insurance customers in Montana, Idaho, Oregon, Washington and Alaska. Northwest FCS is a member of the nationwide Farm Credit System that supports agriculture and rural communities with reliable, consistent credit and financial services. For more information, go to northwestfcs.com


Pictured left to right: Gregg Hunter, Delaney Biel, Dorothy Jensen, Northwest FCS Relationship Manager/Branch Manager Whitney Tatafu, Jamie Mix and Heidi McColly.

Valley County To Receive $1,116,033 In Federal PILT Funding

Tuesday, June 30th 2020

WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt announced today that more than 1,900 local governments around the country will receive $514.7 million in Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) funding for 2020.

“This year’s distribution of $514.7 million to more than 1,900 counties will help small towns pay for critical needs like emergency response, public safety, public schools, housing, social services, and infrastructure,” said Secretary Bernhardt.

PILT payments are made annually for tax-exempt Federal lands administered by U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) agencies including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the National Park Service (NPS), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), for lands administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s U.S. Forest Service (USFS); and for Federal water projects and some military installations.

Using a statutory formula, the annual PILT payments to local governments are computed based on the number of acres of Federal land within each county or jurisdiction and on the population of that county or jurisdiction. The lands include the national forest and national park systems; lands in the FWS Refuge System; areas managed by the BLM; areas managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation water resource development projects; and others.

Since PILT payments began in 1977, DOI has distributed over $9.7 billion dollars to States and the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

DOI collects more than $13.2 billion in revenue annually from commercial activities on public lands, such as oil and gas leasing, livestock grazing, and timber harvesting. A portion of these revenues are shared with States and counties. The balance is deposited in the U.S. Treasury, which in turn pays for a broad array of Federal activities, including PILT funding.

Individual county payments may vary from year to year as a result of changes in acreage data, which is updated annually by the Federal agency administering the land; prior-year Federal revenue sharing payments reported annually by the Governor of each State; and population data, which is updated using information from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Federal revenue sharing payments are made to local governments under programs other than PILT during the previous fiscal year, including payments such as those made under the Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act, the Refuge Revenue Sharing Fund, the National Forest Fund, the Taylor Grazing Act, the Mineral Leasing Act, the Federal Power Act, and the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act of 2000, as authorized.

A full list of funding by State and county is available at Payment in Lieu of Taxes website.

Confirmed Covid-19 Case In Valley County Is A FMDH Employee

Monday, June 29th 2020

Valley County, Montana): Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital would like to confirm that one of the three positive Valley County COVID-19 cases is a hospital employee. The employee has not worked at the FMDH facility since they were exposed.

Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital reassures you that we continue to take all appropriate precautions to keep our community protected. We are safe, ready, and open to care for you. You are encouraged to practice social distancing, wash your hands, and wear a mask in public.

Valley County Community Foundation Grants $34,791 To Valley County Projects

Monday, June 29th 2020

Hammers are pounding, trenches are dug, a building is being inspected, and projects all over Valley County are coming to completion thanks to $34,791 from the Valley County Community Foundation. Eight organizations recently received checks from the Foundation’s
annual grant program.

Board Chair Doris Leader of Nashua explained where funding for these grants comes from. VCCF is something like the community’s savings account, she said. Donations to VCCF are invested and earnings from this endowment come back to Valley County in the form of grants.
“The grants given to local governments and nonprofits in Valley County assist by providing necessary items that they might not otherwise be able to obtain,” she said. “I am honored to be a part of the Board of VCCF. The donations to this organization go to very worthy recipients in Valley County.”

This year’s grantees are:
• Glasgow City-County Library: $5,000 for basement improvements that will modify an exit route and help build two restrooms;
• Opheim School: $3,000 to pay for an energy audit in preparation for replacing the school’s heating system;
• Hinsdale Student Council and FFA Chapter: $2,401 to help make the final payment on the lease agreement on the Healthy Snack Vending machine;
• Irle School: $6,990 to purchase a 3-D laser printer and the compact filter;
• Nashua Senior Citizens: $1,500 to help pay for materials and labor to install new windows in the entry to the Center;
• Glasgow Wrestling Club: $3,000 to help purchase wall mats for the wrestling area in their new facility;
• Glasgow Reds: $7,900 to help install a Dry Prairie Water line to Legion Field, including the hook-up fee, piping, trenching and supplies;
• Two Rivers Economic Growth for the Smith Bike Park on Hwy 2 in Glasgow: $5,000 to install a pathway into the Park, purchase a grill and a clothesline, and bring electricity to the grain bin shelter.
While total costs on some projects are greater than the amount granted, each grant fulfilled the amount requested by the organizations.

Financial gifts to the VCCF from local residents, and others who treasure life here, are invested with the statewide Montana Community Foundation. As of March 31, the VCCF endowment value has grown to $1,032,830. Earnings from the funds within it provide money for these grants, along with two separate scholarship programs. Since 1999, VCCF has awarded $259,204 in grants for 147 projects and $70,325 in scholarships to 47 students.

VCCF awards grants to non-profit organizations with 501 (c) (3) tax status, educational institutions, and government entities, all within Valley County. Applications for the annual grants are due in March. Information is available at www.valleycountycf.net.

VCCF is an independent, non-profit, 501 (c) (3) organization that recently celebrated its 20th year in existence. It is sometimes confused with the Valley County Combined Campaign, which is also an independent organization. The two are separate entities.

Along with Leader, VCCF board members are Vice Chair Sam Waters; Treasurer Maggan Walstad; Secretary Darla Larson; Jean Carlson of Fort Peck; Heidi Johnson of Hinsdale; Jeff Sanders of Richland/Glasgow; and Ken Jansa, Cindy Markle, Whitney Tatafu, and Gary Wageman of Glasgow.

Counterfeit Bills Being Passed In Glasgow Area

Monday, June 29th 2020

The Glasgow Chamber of Commerce has received reports that counterfeit bills are being passed in the Glasgow area. Merchants are asked to be aware of the possibility of these bill being passed.

2 Additional Cases Of Covid-19 Found In Valley County

Sunday, June 28th 2020

Valley County, Montana): Valley County Public Health Department and Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital today confirm the second and third positive cases of COVID-19 of Valley County residents.
Case #2 is a female in her 20s who is isolating at home. The case investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. The individual was symptomatic.
Case #3 is a male in his 30s who is isolating at home. The case investigation is ongoing and contact tracing has begun. The individual was symptomatic.
Valley County Public Health Department is following up directly with all individuals who have had close contact with either cases and are at risk of infection. All close contacts will be notified and tested for COVID-19.
Take the following steps to aid in the contact tracing process and protect yourself and your family:
• Please have your voicemail set up and cleared so that you can receive messages.
• Through contact tracing, Valley County Public Health Department will ask close contacts to
be tested.
• Limit your contact with others. Avoid large group gatherings. Wear a mask when social
distancing is difficult.
• Monitor yourself and family members for the development of COVID-19 symptoms,
including a new/sudden dry cough, shortness of breath, body aches, sore throat, fatigue and a fever of 100.5 or greater. If you are experiencing these symptoms, contact your healthcare provider.
Continue to practice COVID-19 precautions, including staying home when you are sick, monitoring for symptoms, washing your hands, and cover your cough.

Glasgow High School Graduate Involved In Testing Wastewater For COVID-19

Friday, June 26th 2020

Testing wastewater to detect the virus that causes COVID-19 has the potential to be an early warning sign for COVID-19 spreading in any particular community.

Blake Wiedenheft is a graduate of Glasgow High School and a researcher at Montana State University in Bozeman. He was a guest on Thursday's edition of Live Under the Big Sky and talked about efforts to test wastewater in Gallatin County for COVID-19.

Wiedenheft was asked how testing wastewater came about when dealing with the Covid pandemic.

https://soundcloud.com/kltz-glasgow/blake

The Gallatin County Health Department reports that the information received from the testing of the wastewater has been vital:

The wastewater testing that has been completed so far tells us at least two key pieces of information:

Finding the virus in wastewater has either come just before or at the same time as new confirmed cases in Bozeman, West Yellowstone, and Big Sky. This gives us information about where the virus is and where it is spreading. For example, if the virus is found in wastewater in towns with no confirmed cases, this could mean that new cases will soon appear. In towns where no virus is found in the wastewater, this could mean that few people, if any, are infected in the community.

Wastewater testing also shows whether viral levels in wastewater are going up, staying the same, or going down from week to week. For example, decreasing virus levels in wastewater seems to be linked with decreasing numbers of new confirmed cases in Bozeman and West Yellowstone.

Valley County Employees Receive Increase of 1.81% Per Hour

Friday, June 26th 2020

The Valley County Commissioners approved a salary increase of 1.81% per hour for all regular full-time and part-time employees effective July, 1 2020.

This also affects all elected officials in Valley County government.

The new salaries for elected officials beginning July 1, 2020:

Valley County Commissioner: $50,766.89

Valley County Treasurer: $50,766.89

Valley County Clerk of District Court: $50,766.89

Valley County Justice of Peace: $30,459.95

Valley County Sheriff/Coroner: $59,163.26

Valley County Clerk and Recorder/Superintendent of Schools/Election Administrator: $58,081.88

Valley County Attorney: $122,170.67 (The State Of Montana contributes $72,366.58 of this salary)

256 Individuals Tested For COVID-19 At Drive-Thru Testing Event In Glasgow

Friday, June 26th 2020

256 individuals were tested for COVID-19 at a drive-thru testing event at the Northeast Montana Fairgrounds on Thursday.

The event was used to determine asymptomatic positive COVID-19 cases for surveillance purposes.

Individuals who were tested will find out results within 10-14 days.

Fort Peck Tribal Operations Shut Down For 10 Days Due To COVID-19

Friday, June 26th 2020

A notice sent out to all Fort Peck Tribal Employees directs that Tribal operations will be shut down for 10 days due to COVID-19.

The memo accompanies this story:

Bison Moved From Yellowstone National Park To Fort Peck Indian Reservation

Friday, June 26th 2020

BILLINGS (AP) — A group of Yellowstone National Park bison has been transferred to a Montana quarantine facility, the fourth shipment meant to help boost herd numbers across the nation.

The 11 animals were moved to the Fort Peck Indian Reservation Wednesday, The Billings Gazette reports.

The Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes worked with the state of Montana and partnered with conservation organization Defenders of Wildlife to truck the bison from corrals at Corwin Springs.

The corrals were used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to conduct bison quarantine studies.

Fort Peck in northeast Montana has received 104 bison since April 2019 that were quarantined by Yellowstone bison managers.

Yellowstone bison are known to carry brucellosis, a disease that can cause pregnant cattle to abort and infect humans with undulant fever, which causes fever, weakness and muscle pain.

Fort Peck's herd has reached its capacity of about 350 to 375 animals spread across 23.4 square miles. New animals will be transferred to other herds.

Tribal herds of Yellowstone bison will contribute to the interior department goal of developing a connected population of wild bison from Canada to Mexico.

Governor Bullock Announces Directive That Permits Safe Visitation In Nursing Homes And Assisted Living Facilities

Friday, June 26th 2020

MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock today announced an updated directive that permits safe visitation in nursing homes and assisted living facilities that are able to follow infection control protocols per guidance issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

“I’d like to offer my thanks to the staff of residential facilities for older adults across Montana for all they have done and continue to do to keep Montanans safe and healthy,” said Governor Bullock. “We recognize this has been a particularly challenging time for Montana’s older adults and it’s our hope that these Montanans will be able to have some social interaction in safe ways with their loved ones.”

Nursing care and assisted living facilities for older adults in Montana may allow visitors after giving notice to residents and family members. Visitation should be conducted in accordance with the strict screening, physical distancing, sanitation, hygiene, testing, and other infection control protocols set forth in the CMS and CDC guidance applicable to nursing homes. Before permitting visitation, facilities should review the applicable CDC and CMS guidance and determine that they are capable of following them.

CMS guidance can be found at this link: https://www.cms.gov/files/document/qso-20-30-nh.pdf

Governor Bullock’s April 22 Phase 1 reopening directive continued the suspension of visitation for all visitors and non-essential healthcare providers, except as for certain compassionate care situations.

Montana FWP Proposing To Purchase Conservation Easement Southeast Of Hinsdale

Friday, June 26th 2020

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks is proposing to purchase a conservation easement on approximately 3,400 deeded acres in Valley County, roughly 5 miles southeast of Hinsdale.

The public is invited to comment on the proposal, and FWP will hold a public meeting at the Cottonwood Inn in Glasgow on Monday, June 29, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting is expected to be small and will be held consistent with Montana’s Phase 2 social distancing guidelines. People can also provide comment online, in writing or via email. If you feel ill please stay home and comment via another venue.
Conservation easements are partnerships between FWP and willing private landowners to conserve important native wildlife habitats and provide public recreational access. The proposed easement, called the Ash Coulee Conservation Easement, would provide protection, enhancement, and public access to prairie riparian corridors, sagebrush and shrub grasslands, and plains grasslands adjacent to the Milk River. A rest rotation grazing system would be implemented to maintain and improve wildlife habitat on the property.

A draft environmental assessment is available for review and public comment. The EA can be viewed online at fwp.mt.gov/news/publicNotices/conservationEasements/pn_0044.html or a hard copy can be obtained by calling 406-228-3700. Comments can be submitted online, emailed to wildlife biologist Drew Henry at dhenry@mt.gov, or mailed to: MT FWP, Attn. Ash Coulee Conservation Easement, 1 Airport Road, Glasgow, MT 59230.

For any additional information or questions, please contact Drew Henry at 406-228-3709. The public can comment up to 5 p.m., Friday, July 10. If the project moves forward following public comment, it will go before the Fish & Wildlife Commission for a final decision.

Fort Peck Tribal Executive Board Prohibits Departments From Participating In Wolf Point Stampede Due To Covid-19

Thursday, June 25th 2020

The Fort Peck Tribe Executive Board voted Tuesday to prohibit Tribal Departments from participating in the Wolf Point Wild Horse Stampede July 9-11. The TEB also encouraged tribal members not to participate in the event.

Here is the document passed by the Tribal Executive Board:

Valley County's First COVID-19 Drive-Thru Testing Is Thursday

Wednesday, June 24th 2020

Valley County's 1st COVID-19 drive-thru testing event will be held Thurs. June 25th from 10a.m. – 3p.m. at the Northeast Montana Fairgrounds.

This will be used to determine asymptomatic positive COVID-19 cases for surveillance purposes. All you need is yourself inside a vehicle, more than 1 person can be in the same vehicle to be tested.

There is no charge & no appointment is necessary as this is 1st come 1st served. Anyone that is asymptomatic, must be healthy at time of sample collection, can be tested - there are no age or other demographic restrictions. This is for anyone that would like to be tested, regardless of where you live.

This test is only used to identify current positive cases of COVID-19. They have the capability of administering up to 500 tests & you will receive your results in the mail in 10-14 days.

Tester Secures Nearly $1 Million for Montana Health Care Workforce Training

Tuesday, June 23rd 2020

Funding for University of Montana and Montana State University to increase diversity, improve health care access in rural Montana

(U.S. Senate) – U.S. Senator Jon Tester today announced he has secured nearly $1 million to help Montanans train for and secure a job in health care.

Tester announced the funds, which are available through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), will benefit students at the University of Montana and Montana State University. UM will receive $438,278 for a program that trains medical residents in rural and underserved areas, and MSU will receive $344,880 for scholarships to increase diversity in the health care workforce.

“The COVID-19 health crisis has shone a spotlight on the critical need for good doctors and nurses here in Montana” Tester said. “This funding will help us get more quality health care providers into our rural and underserved areas, and help make the health care workforce looks more like the folks they care for. I am going to keep fighting to make sure Montana communities have the resources they need to stay healthy and secure for the duration of this crisis and beyond.”

Tester has fought relentlessly to improve access to health care in rural Montana by training more providers to work in frontier communities and making sure hospitals in those communities have the resources they need. He voted in support of the Fiscal Year 2020 Appropriations Bills that provided $430 million for HRSA Health Workforce programs. Tester also authored the Restoring Rural Residencies Act in 2016 after hosting a Rural Health Summit that brought together more than 100 health care professionals and policy-makers to discuss challenges facing health care providers in Montana. This bill would allow rural hospitals to bill for time residents spend training at their sites. The Administration finalized a policy change to allow hospitals to receive reimbursement for residents’ training time based on Tester’s proposal.

Tester has also worked tirelessly to ensure that Montana hospitals and health care facilities are prepared to combat the COVID-19 crisis. He recently announced nearly $50 million in Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act funding to help Montana expand testing capacity. He also secured $3 million for 14 Montana community health centers to expand COVID-19 testing, and he delivered nearly $200 million in relief funding for 121 rural Montana hospitals, health centers, and clinics.

Drought Early Warning Update For The North Central U.S.

Tuesday, June 23rd 2020

Extreme Heat & Dry Conditions Forecasted to Persist: Potential Impacts in the Missouri River Basin & Midwest

This Drought Early Warning Update is issued in partnership between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to communicate a potential area of concern for drought expansion and/or development within the North Central U.S. based on recent conditions and the upcoming forecast. NIDIS and its partners will issue future Drought Early Warning Updates as conditions evolve.?

This covers the following states in the North Central U.S.: Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.

Drought conditions have been recently deteriorating over areas of the North Central U.S. (Colorado, Kansas, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wyoming). Abnormally dry conditions have recently expanded as well.

A recent increase in atmospheric demand (i.e., crop water use) is starting to cause some stress on rangeland, grassland, and crops as soil moisture availability is decreasing.

Forecasts show the possibility for rainfall in some areas over the next week. However, it is not likely to be widespread. In addition, there is a greater chance for above-normal temperatures across much of the north central U.S. through the end of June into early July. Therefore, for those that do receive rainfall, hotter temperatures will likely continue to worsen conditions in some areas.

U.S. Drought Monitor Conditions

Severe (D2) to extreme (D3) drought persists across much of Colorado and western Kansas.
Moderate drought (D1) recently developed in portions of the Missouri River Basin and Midwest as well.
Abnormally dry conditions (D0) also expanded this past week by around 10% in the Midwest and 8% in the Great Plains.

Valley County With Unemployment Rate of 5.2% In May

Friday, June 19th 2020

April, the Montana unemployment rate was at 11.9%. The Montana unemployment rate remained below the national rate of 13.3% in May.

“Due to our early action to prevent the spread of COVID-19, we’ve been able to continue with the phased reopening of our state, our economy is recovering, and thousands of Montanans have returned to work,” said Governor Bullock. “As we keep working to fight the spread of the virus, we will keep working every single day to stimulate our economy and support Montana families and businesses through this time.”

Montana posted the third fastest payroll employment growth among states in May with 4% over the month growth, and had the 7th lowest unemployment rate in the country. Private payroll employment also posted a record-breaking gain of 15,700 jobs over the month, with improvement across most private industries. Job losses in the local government sector kept overall payroll employment gains to 13,300 jobs. Total employment (including both payroll jobs and the self-employed) added 16,780 jobs over the month – the most jobs added in any single month since the data series began in 1976. Despite these large job gains, Montana’s May employment estimate remains roughly 44,000 jobs below its pre-pandemic peak.

Since this employment data was captured in May, unemployment claims continue to drop, suggesting future employment data will continue to improve. Since the peak of unemployment claims during the week of April 18, nearly 29,000 Montanans have gone back to work to date and are no longer making a claim. In addition, approximately 15,000 Montanans have gone back to work part time.

Valley County had an unemployment rate of 5.2% with total employment of 3,695 and a total job decrease of 312 from last year.

Valley County Resident Tests Positive For COVID-19 But Is Not Currently In Valley County

Thursday, June 18th 2020

Valley County, Montana): Valley County Public Health Department and Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital today confirm one positive case of COVID-19 of a Valley County resident. This person is a male in his 60s who is not currently in Valley County. He will remain in isolation in the county in which he was infected for the duration of his illness.

Valley County Public Health Department is following up directly with all individuals who have had close contact with the case and are at risk of infection. All close contacts will be notified and tested for COVID-19.

Governor Bullock Announces Creation Of Loan Deferment Program

Thursday, June 18th 2020

MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock today announced the creation of a loan deferment program to assist Montana businesses impacted by COVID-19.

The Montana Loan Deferment Program will allow businesses and other entities to defer payments on existing loans for six to 12 months and free up a significant amount of otherwise dedicated capital for the borrower to leverage on a monthly basis. If a borrower is approved for the program, Coronavirus relief funds will be used to provide payments to participating lenders to cover interest payments for six-to-twelve months, up to 6 percent or $150, 000.

“Through the Coronavirus Relief Fund, we’ve been able to consider and begin meeting the needs across all sectors of the economy and in all corners of the state,” Governor Bullock said. “The funds we’ve distributed have gotten Montanans back to work, stabilized businesses, provided a safety net for individuals, and jumpstarted industries while considering what support should be available to ensure long term sustainability.”

Governor Bullock is directing $125 million to the program with $25 million specifically dedicated to hotels and restaurants and the remaining $100 million dedicated to other eligible borrowers.

The amount currently dedicated to this program could help defer between 5,000 and 10,000 loans and free up capital to bring stability for businesses and other entities in the long term.

“This program will provide a much needed lifeline to many Montana small businesses to help them recover from the impact of COVID-19 and allow them to get stronger for the future,” said Randy Chesler, CEO of Glacier Bancorp.

“This program will not only provide much needed relief to Montana businesses, it will do so in a way that allows the state’s banks to mitigate risks in the marketplace. Montana’s community banks have stepped up in a big way and will continue to do so through this program in order to help the people of Montana get through this crisis,” said Andy West, President of Eagle Bank in Polson.

To be eligible, borrowers must have experienced a 25 percent reduction in gross revenue due to COVID-19. The borrower must also not have access to 12 months of working capital from any other source and be actively registered with the Secretary of State to do business in Montana. The full eligibility criteria are available at COVIDRELIEF.MT.GOV.

The program will be jointly administered by the Board of Investments and the Department of Revenue. Borrowers will apply through their existing lender, which will submit the application to the Board of Investments and Revenue for review and payment if approved. Recipients will be listed on the transparency website that is updated weekly.

For businesses seeking access to new capital, the state is currently developing a program that will assist those with needs for new capital.

Governor Bullock also announced he is allocating $530,000 to the Department of Commerce to promote the Census through October 31, the new deadline for completing the decennial count.

“We know an accurate and complete count of all Montanans is critical for determining the federal funding distributed to the state for education, highways, health care and over 300 other programs,” Governor Bullock said. “This funding will support the state over the long term and ensure we do everything we can to get a complete count and our fair share of federal funding over the next decade.”

While the federal government is tasked with counting all households every 10 years, the state supports the effort to educate and promote the importance of the Census. The U.S. Census Bureau suspended all field operations from March to early May to slow the spread of COVID-19, which put Montana’s response rate below the national average. An accurate and complete count of all Montanans is critical for determining the federal funding distributed to the state, it shapes local voting districts, and it determines whether Montana will receive a second seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

The following programs have been created in under two months using funding through $1.25 billion in federal emergency relief funding through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act:

• Montana Meat Processing Infrastructure Grant, Montana Department of Agriculture
• Montana Business Adaptation Program, Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation
• Montana Business Stabilization Program, Montana Department of Commerce
• Montana Innovation Grant Program, Governor’s Office of Economic Development
• Montana Food and Agriculture Adaptability Program, Montana Department of Agriculture
• Local Government Reimbursement Program
• Emergency Housing Assistance Program, Montana Department of Commerce
• Public Health Grants, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services,
• Stay Connected Grants, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services
• Food Bank and Food Pantry Assistance, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services
• Social Services Nonprofit Grants, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services
• Telework Assistance Grants, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services

More than $30 million has gone to Montanans and Montana businesses impacted by COVID-19. To find the transparency webpage and learn more about where the funds are going, go to COVIDRELIEF.MT.GOV.

Amtrak To Reduce Service On Empire Builder To Three Days A Week

Thursday, June 18th 2020

Amtrak will cut service later this year on most of its long-distance routes nationwide to three times a week instead of the current daily service because ridership has fallen significantly during the coronavirus pandemic.

Amtrak spokeswoman Kimberly Woods said Wednesday that the cuts will take effect Oct. 1 and remain in place until at least the summer of 2021, but daily service could be restored if demand improves along its long-distance routes.

Jim Mathews, president and chief executive of the Rail Passengers Association advocacy group, said he thinks the cuts are short-sighted and will hurt long-term demand for these routes.

“The long-distance services declined the least among Amtrak’s three business lines during the coronavirus-induced slowdown, and its services remain essential to the hundreds of small communities across the United States with fewer options than Philadelphia or Boston or New York City,” Mathews said.

The train routes being cut to three days a week include the California Zephyr, Capitol Limited, City of New Orleans, Coast Starlight, Crescent, Empire Builder, Lake Shore Limited, Palmetto, Southwest Chief, and Texas Eagle. The Sunset Limited and Cardinal trains already operate three times a week.

Amtrak said its Auto Train, which runs from the Washington, D.C., suburbs to the Orlando, Florida, area, is the only long-distance route that will continue to operate daily.

Trump Administration Asks Supreme Court To Revive Permit Program That Would Allow Keystone Pipeline To Cross Waterways With Little Review

Wednesday, June 17th 2020

HELENA, Mont. -- The Trump administration has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to revive a permit program that would allow the disputed Keystone XL pipeline and other new oil and gas pipelines to cross waterways with little review.

Earlier this year, a Montana judge suspended the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ permit program when environmental groups seeking to block construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline argued the permit process allows companies to skirt responsibility for damage done to water bodies.

The permit program, known as Nationwide Permit 12, allows pipelines to be built across streams and wetlands with minimal review if they meet certain criteria.

Canadian company TC Energy needs the permit to build the long-disputed pipeline from Canada across U.S. rivers and streams. Industry representatives said U.S. District Judge Brian Morris' ruling blocking the program could also delay more than 70 pipeline projects across the U.S. and add as much as $2 billion in costs.

Morris ruled that Army Corps officials in 2017 improperly reauthorized the program, which he said could harm protected wildlife and wildlife habitat.

Last month, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals denied an emergency request to block Morris' ruling filed by the U.S. government, states and industry groups.

On Monday, U.S. Solicitor General Noel Francisco asked the Supreme Court to do what the 9th Circuit court wouldn't: block Morris' ruling and let the permit program operate again while the lawsuit plays out in court.

The government's application to the court says Morris shouldn't have blocked the program, the which has been in effect since the 1970s, and the Army Corps and private companies “rely on it for thousands of activities annually," the solicitor general wrote.

“The district court had no warrant to set aside NWP 12 with respect to Keystone XL, let alone for the construction of all new oil and gas pipelines anywhere in the country,” Francisco wrote.

One of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a statement that the Supreme Court should reject the Trump administration's request.

“Pipelines like Keystone XL are a disaster waiting to happen," senior attorney Jared Margolis said in the statement.

In May, TC Energy built the first piece of the disputed oil sands pipeline across the U.S. border. But with Morris' ruling on the permit program, it would be difficult for the company to complete the $8 billion project.

The 1,200-mile (1,900-kilometer) pipeline from Alberta to Nebraska was stalled for much of the past decade before President Donald Trump was elected and began trying to push it through to completion.

Reminder: Federal And State Income Taxes Are Due July 15th

Wednesday, June 17th 2020

As Montanans look forward to summer, the Montana Department of Revenue has a reminder: Federal and state income taxes are due July 15.

“Montanans have handled a lot in these past few months, so I thank all those who have already filed their returns,” said Gene Walborn, director of the Department of Revenue. “For those who haven’t, this is a good time to make sure you have your tax information available and find any help you may need to file.”

Filing electronically is the easiest and most secure way to submit your return, and is the quickest way to receive any refund due.

This year, the department has a new way for Montanans with simple taxes to file their state income tax returns online, quickly and for free. MT QuickFile is now available for Montanans who:
• Were full-year Montana residents in 2019;
• Only have income documented on W-2, 1099-DIV or 1099-INT forms;
• Are filing as single, head of household, or married filing jointly;
• Are taking the standard deduction;
• Are not claiming any tax credits (other than the Elderly Homeowner/Renter Credit.)

Montanans who meet all these criteria should check if they can use MT QuickFile, available at MTRevenue.gov.

To avoid delays in receiving refunds, all Montanans should keep their mailing address current with the department.

For more information, visit MTRevenue.gov.

FPST Opens With Sunshine Boys

Wednesday, June 17th 2020

We are all ready for a comedy, and Fort Peck Summer Theater is sure to deliver with the season opener, The Sunshine Boys. Rivalry, memories and lots of laughs are certain to resurface when a former vaudeville team grudgingly re-unite for a Television Special! Neal Lewing, who was a member of the original FPST company, 51 seasons ago, returns to direct and star in this classic Neil Simon comedy.

George Burns and Walter Matthau famously starred in the Oscar winning film adaption.

The FPST production is in collaboration with Port Polson Players, where it performed last season. Along with Lewing in the Matthau role, it stars Louis Jepson, Mike Gillpatrick, K.C. Isaman and Karen Lewing. Scenic Design is by Cole Bakke, with Lighting by Spencer Perry.

Performances are July 3 – July 12; Friday & Saturday at 7:30pm and Sunday at 4:00pm.
For more information call 406-526-9943 or visit our online box office at fortpecktheatre.org


Determined to safely overcome the obstacles set by COVID-19, FPST has restructured the originally announced 2020 season, with the continued goal to bring enriching and exciting entertainment to Northeast Montana audiences. Following The Sunshine Boys, the 2020 season continues with:

• Ed Asner in God Help Us: July 17 – July 19
• The Big Zany Family Friendly Variety Hour (different theme each week): July 24 – August 9
• Love Letters: August 14 – August 16
• Wait Until Dark: August 21 – September 6

DPHHS Proposes Rules to Eliminate the Sale of Flavored E-Cigarettes in Montana

Wednesday, June 17th 2020


The Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) filed T a proposed rule notice to eliminate the sale of flavored e-cigarettes in response to the epidemic of youth e-cigarette product use in Montana.

The proposed rule would eliminate the selling, offering for sale, marketing, advertising or otherwise distributing flavored electronic smoking products that target Montana youth.
“This is a serious health issue in Montana that is causing major health consequences for our youth driving a lifelong addiction to nicotine,” DPHHS Director Sheila Hogan said. “I strongly encourage Montanans to participate in this public process by submitting their feedback, thoughts and suggestions on this critical step to protecting the health of Montana’s children from flavored tobacco.”

A public hearing will be held via remote conferencing to consider the proposed rules on Thursday, July 16, 2020 at 3 p.m. Interested parties wanting to provide public comment are encouraged to participate by calling into the hearing. Call-in information is provided in the rule posting.

Montana historically has ranked above the national average in youth vaping rates. Nearly 60% of Montana high school students and 30% of middle school students have tried vaping. In 2019, almost one in 10 Montana high school students vaped daily, exposing their brains to the long-term effects of nicotine addiction. This is a 263% increase from 2017.

A recent report by the FDA states that 96% of 12 to 17-year-olds who initiated e-cigarette use started with a flavored product, and 70% report the flavors as the reason they use e-cigarettes. E-cigarettes are available in thousands of youth-appealing flavors, including fruit, candy, mint and menthol. The overwhelming majority of youth e-cigarette users report using flavored products.
This rule would eliminate the sale of all flavored e-cigarette products. The rule, however, does not apply to medical marijuana products sold by licensed providers.

Massachusetts was the first state to restrict the sale of all flavored tobacco products. New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island have restricted the sale of flavored e-cigarettes. Over 270 local cities and counties across the country have enacted restrictions on the sale of flavored e-cigarettes, from Colorado to Minnesota to Massachusetts.

Earlier this year, the FDA restricted the sale of some flavor in pod-based e-cigarettes, however, the federal policy does not apply to many types of e-cigarettes, like open systems and disposable e-cigarettes, leaving states with the job of taking action to protect kids.

Montana teens use e-cigarettes at twice the national average, and more is being learned about the health effects of vaping. Research has shown that youth who use e-cigarettes are four times more likely to become smokers.

“The best way never to get addicted to nicotine is not to start,” said DPHHS Public Health and Safety Division Administrator Todd Harwell. “Sadly, most individuals who are currently addicted to nicotine started using these products before the age of 18, and youth are enticed by the flavors.”
Nicotine is a highly addictive drug that can have lasting damaging effects on adolescent brain development since the brain continues to develop until age 25. Nicotine exposure in youth causes long-term structural and functional changes in the brain, can lead to long-lasting effects like lower impulse control and mood disorders, and can prime young brains for addiction to other drugs such as cocaine and meth.


Tuesday, June 16th 2020

The Glasgow City Council members are once again presenting a Yard of the Week to Glasgow residents. Each council member will select a yard in their respective Ward.

Todd Young this week selected the yard of Carol Robbins.

Carol lives at 811 7th Avenue North in Glasgow. Todd Young presents Carol with $25 in Chamber Big Bucks.

Nashua Senior Citizen News

Tuesday, June 16th 2020

Darwin Johnson was recently recognized by the Nashua Senior Citizens, along with the Commodity Supplemental Food Program in Nashua, for his many years of service to the Commodities Program. Darwin has carried the foodstuffs in and out of the distribution faithfully for over 15 years. He was presented with a quilt made by Patricia Neuleib for his many years of dependable help. Thank you, Darwin!

The Commodity Supplemental Food Program is available to seniors 60 years of age and over and WIC families with children. It provides a box of 30 pounds of food per month. Seniors must meet income requirements, which are 130% of the 2019 poverty level. Applications are available at the Nashua Senior Citizens or through Vicky Wetz at the Council on Aging in Glasgow, phone 228-9223.

The Nashua Senior Citizens has recently been awarded two grants. The Valley County Community Foundation awarded a grant to help replace windows at the Center. Also, a grant was awarded from the State of Montana Covid Relief Program to offset losses during the Covid shutdown. The Center has been shut down since March, and it won’t open until Montana’s Phase 3. These funds will be greatly appreciated by the Seniors.

The Nashua Senior Citizens have set a date for the Annual Nashua Community Rummage Day to be July 18, the third Saturday in July. Anyone in Nashua who has items that they want to get rid of, set this date as your garage sale date. If there are coordinated garage/rummage sales, people could come to Nashua for the day to all of them.

Jeff Jurgens Memorial Scholarships Awarded

Monday, June 15th 2020

Six Valley County high-school graduates have received Jeff Jurgens Memorial Scholarships to enable their studies at colleges and universities.

The scholarships are awarded annually by the Scottie Booster Club in memory of the late Jeff Jurgens, Glasgow student and rabid sports fan whose namesake basketball tournament, held annually in March, is the source of the funds. While this year’s Jeff Jurgens Memorial Tournament was cancelled due to coronavirus restrictions, the Scottie Booster Club is awarding scholarships regardless.

“The mission of the Scottie Booster Club is to support youth of the community, and we felt obligated to fulfill that mission despite missing our year’s biggest fundraiser,” says Mike Pehlke, president of the Booster Club. “Especially this year, with so much disruption of their senior year in high school, we are pleased to be able to support a class of standout athletes and students as they continue their success at the next level.”

In order to be eligible for the Jeff Jurgens scholarship, students must have graduated from a Valley County school and either played varsity basketball or are entering a medical or health-related field of study. This year, the Booster Club selected six scholarship recipients from Glasgow High School, Nashua High School, Hinsdale High School, and Lustre Christian High School.

Applicants’ athletic backgrounds are considered, along with academic achievement and career plans, community service, citizenship, and financial need.

This year’s JJMT Scholars are:

Salomon Hansen – A 2020 graduate of Glasgow High School, Hansen participated in four different sports as a Scottie, and played in the Jeff Jurgens Memorial Tournament for seven straight years. He was selected for National Honor Society and served as a Key Club member and G Club officer. Hansen, the son of Peggy and Steve Hansen, plans to attend Montana State University in Bozeman starting this fall.

Taylor Pederson – Another 2020 graduate of Glasgow High School, Pederson intends to attend Williston State College this fall. She participated in four years each of basketball, volleyball, and softball, was a member of the National Honor Society, Key Club, JMG, and BPA. She also played for multiple years in the Jeff Jurgens Memorial Tournament on various Glasgow teams. Taylor is the daughter of Marie and Duke Pederson.

Timothy Wageman – The son of Annette and Gary Wageman, Tim is a 2020 graduate of Glasgow High School, where he played Scottie basketball all four years and participated in football, cross country, and track. He also participated for seven years in the JJMT. Wageman was a member of the National Honor Society, G Club, was a class officer for four years, and has been a Cub and Boy Scout for 12 years. He plans to attend MSU-Bozeman to pursue a degree in electrical engineering.

Megan Fast – A 2020 graduate of Lustre Christian High School, Fast plans to attend Bismarck State College this fall to pursue a degree in surgical technology. Fast played basketball and volleyball for two years, was a member of National Honor Society, served as class officer all four years at Lustre, and is active in her church. She is the daughter of Susan and Jared Fast of rural Frazer.

Elise Strommen – 2020 Hinsdale High School graduate Elise Strommen will attend Montana State University this fall to pursue a degree in business management. The daughter of Amber and Justin Strommen of Vandalia, she participated in basketball, volleyball, and track all four years of high school, and also served as a student council officer, participated in 4-H, FFA, H-Club, and was a member of the National Honor Society. She also played in the JJMT for a Hinsdale squad.

Cordell Younkin – Another 2020 Hinsdale High graduate, Younkin plans to attend MSU-Northern this fall to study welding. He played Raiders basketball for four years, and played football for four years and ran track for two years. He also participated in the JJMT for five years. Younkin, the son of Kay Roub Younkin and Jeff Younkin, was a member of FFA, 4-H, and is active in St. Alberts Catholic Church.

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