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Latest Local News

Canadian Citizen Arrested for Illegal Entry and Kidnapping

Friday, August 12th 2022

A Canadian citizen, Benjamin Martin Moore, along with his alleged Canadian girlfriend and her two children, crossed into the United States illegally by driving through a barbed wire fence located near the Turner Port of Entry. Havre Border Patrol Station agents detected a cut fence while routinely patrolling along the international boundary. Havre Sector Border Patrol reached out to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police through the Integrated Border Enforcement Team (IBET) charter to assist in the identification of the subject. The man not only crossed the border illegally, but also had a lookout for kidnapping as well a history of sexual assault and child pornography.


Havre Sector utilized a Border Patrol Agent assigned to the Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) Task Force to assist in locating the man. The man was apprehended through multi-agency assistance and cooperation and is currently in custody pending prosecution.

“I am proud of the work our agents do every day to keep us safe by using their skills as well as interagency relationships to arrest those who have committed crimes in our communities and abroad,” said Acting Chief Patrol Agent Richard Fortunato. “This is a perfect example of bringing criminals to justice through a whole-of-government approach and working with our international law enforcement partners.”

U.S. Customs and Border Protection welcomes assistance from the community. Individuals can report suspicious activity to Border Patrol by calling 800 BE ALERT or (800) 232-5378. All calls will be answered and remain anonymous.

Gasoline Demand Increases But Price Continues To Fall According To AAA

Friday, August 12th 2022

Since Monday, the national average for a gallon of regular gasoline dropped nine cents to $3.96. The national average has not been below $4 per gallon since March 5. In the spring, oil prices spiked in reaction to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, leading the national average to a new all-time high.

According to new data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), gas demand increased from 8.54 million b/d to 9.12 million b/d last week. However, the rate is 307,000 b/d lower than last year. Moreover, according to EIA, total domestic gasoline stocks decreased by 5 million bbl to 220.3 million bbl. Although gasoline demand has increased and supply has tightened, lower oil prices have helped lower pump prices. If oil prices continue to decline, drivers will likely continue to see pump prices decrease.

At the close of Wednesday’s formal trading session, WTI increased by $1.43 to settle at $91.93. Crude prices rose yesterday after the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported a smaller than expected increase in inflation last month at 8.5 percent. The rise in market optimism helped to boost prices despite EIA reporting that total domestic crude supply increased by 5.4 million bbl last week.

MHP Trooper T'Elle Evans Receives Award From Montana Highway Patrol

Friday, August 12th 2022

Press Release From Montana Highway Patrol:

Two officers recently received one of our highest awards – the Hedstrom Award – for going above and beyond the call of duty when attempting to save a life using their first responder skills. Please join us in congratulating Trooper T'Elle Evans and former Trooper Benjamin Kecskes and thanking them for their heroic actions.

Trooper T'Elle Evans put herself in harms way to protect, secure, and provide life saving aid to a gunshot victim on May 3rd, 2022 in Wolf Point. She immediately provided medical assistance using her individual first aid kit by applying a chest seal to the gunshot victim.

Former Trooper Benjamin Kecskes performed live-saving maneuvers on May 4th, 2022, when he aided an unresponsive male by administering the AED followed by a jaw-thrust maneuver to help the male's breathing go back to normal and monitored him until EMS arrived.

Glasgow City Council To Meet On Monday

Friday, August 12th 2022

The Glasgow City Council will have a regular meeting on Monday. Items on the agenda including setting taxes for the 2022-2023 fiscal year, and approving a 5% increase in street maintenance assessments for city residents.

Assiniboine And Sioux Tribes Receive $195,484 For Tribal Tourism

Thursday, August 11th 2022

The Montana Department of Commerce announced on Tuesday that more than $1.1 million of grant funding has been awarded to seven of Montana’s Tribal Nations to enhance tourism activities. The grant funding is provided through Commerce’s Tribal Tourism Enhancement Grant (TTEG) program.

The TTEG is a pilot grant program that encouraged each of Montana’s Tribes to submit a competitive portfolio of projects — a ‘wish-list’ of ideas to improve, enhance, or create long-term tourism offerings to their nations. Eligible tourism projects were required to be shovel-ready and demonstrate long-lasting resiliency. Seven of the eight Tribal Nations elected to participate; of the 33 projects evaluated, 21 were eligible for full or partial funding.

TTEG funding recipients:

The Blackfeet Nation will receive $174,641.94 to improve the Buffalo Calf Interpretive Center, add toilets to Buffalo Calf and Duck Lake campgrounds, install interpretive art, offer remote car and boat rental activities, make five new Blackfeet-style tipi lodges available for rent at the campgrounds, and create a buffalo robe for display at the Center.

The Chippewa Cree Tribes of Rocky Boy’s will receive $96,000 to purchase a spectator transport off-road vehicle for its Buffalo Tour, make electrical and lighting upgrades, and install a new public address system at the powwow grounds.

The Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians will receive $147,550 to purchase heavy equipment and landscape maintenance vehicles, make facility repairs, install essential campground amenities, and create a new fish cleaning station at the Hell Creek Recreation Area.

The Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of Fort Peck will receive $194,484 for the Tatanka Omaskaskan Buffalo Trail Enhancement project, to renovate the Buffalo Ranch rental facility, and make upgrades to the entrance of Fort Peck.

The Northern Cheyenne Nation will receive $203,813.81 for a shade pavilion at Birney powwow grounds, a memorial statues art installation, powwow arbor improvements at Muddy and Busby districts, and improve the roads, picnic areas, restrooms, and signage at Crazy Heads Recreation Area.

The Crow Nation will receive $90,000 for the expansion of Apsáalooke Tours with the purchase of two lift-equipped shuttle buses, and the development of print materials for tours of Battle Loop, Chief Pretty Eagle Point, Rosebud Battle, Pictograph Cave, and Chief Plenty Coups State Park.
The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes will receive $200,000 for structural and maintenance repairs at Elmo’s Standing Arrow Pavilion, dock repairs at Blue Bay Campground on Flathead Lake, and to recarpet the Arlee dance and games pavilions.

The TTEG program was created thanks to a record amount of 2021 bed tax revenue. The program operates on a reimbursement system with no matching requirement, and presents a unique opportunity to fund numerous tourism projects across Indian Country.

To learn more about the Office of Indian Country Economic Development programs, visit BUSINESS.MT.GOV.

In addition, Commerce’s Business MT and Brand MT divisions recently partnered on a $160,000 Indian Country Summer Events advertising campaign that launched in June, using billboards, radio ads, and social media. Each of the eight Tribal regions had one of its summer events selected for the campaign. For more information about events happening at Montana’s Tribal Nations this summer, go to VISITMT.COM.

Fort Peck walleye spawn and stocking wrap-up for 2022

Tuesday, August 9th 2022

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks annual walleye spawn egg-take on Fort Peck Reservoir was completed at the end of April. In addition, stocking efforts were completed in June across Montana.
With the help of FWP personnel and 58 volunteers, the egg collection goals were exceeded. A total of 2,796 walleye were captured in trap nets, with approximately 96 million eggs collected.

“Inclement weather during the first part of April made collection efforts challenging with gusty winds and cold-water temperatures, but FWP staff and volunteers persevered,” said Fort Peck Reservoir biologist Heath Headley. “Water temperatures returned to more normal conditions towards the end of the end of April and walleye responded very favorably.”

Volunteers
Volunteers are key to this operation. This is the first time in the last three seasons, due to the pandemic, that FWP staff were able to gain the valuable help from volunteers.
“It was great to see many returning faces, and we enjoyed meeting many new volunteers,” said Fort Peck Hatchery manager Wade Geraets. “It was great to see the volunteers back in action and helping with this wonderful program this year, and we hope for another exciting and fulfilling year in 2023.”
“We wouldn’t be able to set all the trap nets, collect fish, and spawn them on a daily basis unless we had help,” added Headley. “Volunteers are the main reason this has been so successful over the years.”

Stocking totals
Roughly 51 million eggs remained at the Fort Peck Multi-Species Fish Hatchery, with about 45 million eggs going to the Miles City Hatchery.
“Not all of these eggs survive to the hatching and fry or fingerling stage, but overall, the hatcheries had good success for stocking Montana lakes and reservoirs,” explained Geraets.
Combined stocking efforts from the Fort Peck and Miles City hatcheries resulted in approximately 29.8 million fry stocked back into the Fort Peck Reservoir, and 1 million fry into Tongue River Reservoir this spring.

In addition, approximately 3.2 million fingerlings from the hatcheries have been released into various water bodies this summer, including:

Region 7
• Tongue River Reservoir- 52.5 thousand
• South Sandstone Reservoir- 10 thousand
• Lake Baker- 5 thousand
• Beaver Creek- 2 thousand
• Castle Rock Reservoir- 1 thousand

Region 6
• Fort Peck Reservoir- 2.9 million
• Nelson Reservoir- 100 thousand
• Fresno Reservoir- 50 thousand
• Beaver Creek Reservoir- 15.5 thousand
• Little Nelson Reservoir- 5 thousand
• Box Elder Lake- 5 thousand
• Ester Lake- 4 thousand
• Cow Creek Reservoir- 3 thousand
• Anita Reservoir- 5 thousand

Region 4
• Lake Frances- 50.6 thousand
• Petrolia Reservoir-20.9 thousand
• Bynum Reservoir- 50 thousand

Northwestern Energy Proposes Rate Increases For Electricity And Natural Gas

Tuesday, August 9th 2022

Montana electric and natural gas customers of NorthWestern Energy can expect one possible rate increase in October, and another sometime in the next year as the company begins a rate case before the Montana Public Service Commission.

On Monday, NorthWestern Energy applied for approval from the PSC for the utility to increase rates for both electric and natural gas customers. If approved by the PSC, an immediate interim rate increase would begin Oct. 1, and raise residential electric rates by 15.9 percent and natural gas rates by 2.3 percent.

For an average residential electric customer using about 750 kilowatt-hours of electricity a month, their monthly bill would go from $89.04 to $103.22 – a $14.18 increase, said Jo Dee Black, NorthWestern spokesperson.

The average residential natural gas customer using 65 therms of natural gas a month would see their monthly bill rise from $68.49 to $70.09 – an about $1.60 increase.

Company Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Crystal Lail said NorthWestern Energy set its prices last based on number from 2017 on the electric side and 2015 on the natural gas side.

“Since then, we’ve invested over a billion in the state of Montana and critical infrastructure,” Lail said. “The ‘Why now’ is, we’re coming in to adjust our prices just like everyone else based off costs going up for us.”

The interim rate increase must be approved by the PSC within the next couple months. However, in its application the company also sought a permanent rate increase of 25.6 percent for electric and 11.1 percent for natural gas.

If the PSC approved the rate increase, which would likely happen sometime in 2023, an average residential customer’s monthly electric bill would rise from $89.04 to $111.80 – an increase of about $22.76.

The average residential customer’s natural gas bill would rise from $68.49 to $76.06 – an increase of $7.57.

However, the increases are still just proposals. The Montana Consumer Counsel, a state agency representing ratepayers, will have an opportunity to intervene in the case as well as other interested parties affected by the proposed rate increase can intervene in the rate case. Members of the public can intervene independent from the consumer counsel. People who do not want to formally intervene can submit written public comment to the PSC.

“We understand that it's incredibly tough for customers right now,” Lail said “Pricing on everything is going up. And importantly, we want customers to know that we have resources to help them.”

Customers in need of help with paying bills can reach out to NorthWestern Energy to learn more about programs such as budget billing, which keeps bills consistent throughout the year and avoids spikes during high energy use months, such as during the winter. The state also offers a Low-Income Energy Assistance Program, which assists low-income households with heating costs, Black said.

A copy of NorthWestern’s application is available online on the PSC’s website. The tracking number is 2022.07.078. Instructions on how to become an interested party can be found under the PSC’s "Notice of Opportunity to Intervene" filing.

Yard Of The Week

Monday, August 8th 2022

Yard of the Week as selected by the Glasgow City Council
Jennifer Fewer
79 Bonnie St

Fort Peck Reservoir Water Levels Remain Steady In July But Forecast To Drop In August

Monday, August 8th 2022

While the Missouri River basin has seen improved runoff for two consecutive months, it is not enough to overcome the long-term drought persisting in much of the basin.

July runoff in the Missouri River basin above Sioux City, Iowa was 3.2 million acre-feet, which is 98% of average and 0.7 MAF more than was forecast last month. This has led to an annual runoff forecast of 20.6 MAF, which is 80% of average and 0.6 MAF higher than last month’s forecast.

“As expected, reservoir inflows in July have been declining due to the warmer and drier conditions in the upper Missouri River Basin,” said John Remus, chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Missouri River Basin Water Management Division. “Per the July 1 System storage check, navigation support was increased slightly to 500 cubic feet per second above minimum-service levels. The navigation support season will be 3 days shorter than normal per the guidance in the Master Manual,” added Remus.

USACE will evaluate lower Missouri River flow conditions to set Gavins Point releases to ensure that flows at the four downstream navigation target locations will be at or above the target levels.

“The monthly study indicates that the winter release from Gavins Point, which is based on the September 1 System storage check, will likely be at a minimum rate of 12,000 cfs,” added Remus.

System storage peaked on July 20 at 52.1 MAF. System storage on August 1 was 51.8 MAF, 4.3 MAF below the base of the Annual Flood Control and Multiple Use Zone. “System storage is expected to continue to decline further into the Carryover Multiple Use Zone during the remainder of 2022 as we make releases during the drier summer and fall periods to meet the authorized purposes,” said Remus.

Drought Conditions:

Overall drought conditions across the basin changed little during the month of July. According to the National Drought Mitigation Center, approximately 62% of the Missouri River basin is currently experiencing some form of abnormally dry or drought conditions, with 6% being extreme or exceptional drought. The seasonal drought outlook, which extends through the end of October, shows drought conditions will persist and expand across the lower basin. Drought information can be viewed at: https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/.

Navigation:

Gavins Point Dam releases will be set to provide navigation flow support at a level 500 cfs above minimum service at all four target locations (Sioux City, Omaha, Nebraska City, and Kansas City). Flow targets may be missed to conserve water if there is no commercial navigation in a given reach. The navigation flow support season will be 3 days less than the normal 8-month season.

Mountain Snowpack:

Mountain snowpack in the upper Missouri River Basin was completely melted by the first week of July. The mountain snowpack peaked above Fort Peck on April 29 at 85% of average, while the mountain snowpack in the Fort Peck to Garrison reach peaked on May 3 at 92% of average. Mountain snowpack normally peaks near April 17.

Reservoir Forecasts:

Gavins Point Dam
Average releases past month – 22,600 cfs
Current release rate – 25,000 cfs
Forecast release rate –26,300 cfs
End-of-July reservoir level – 1206.2 feet
Forecast end-of-August reservoir level – 1206.5 feet
Notes: The Gavins Point release will be adjusted to provide navigation flow support 500 cfs above minimum service on the lower Missouri River.

Fort Randall Dam
Average releases past month – 21,700 cfs
End-of-July reservoir level – 1354.8 feet
Forecast end-of-August reservoir level – 1355.1 feet
Notes: Releases will be adjusted as necessary to maintain the desired reservoir elevation at Gavins Point and to back up Gavins Point releases.

Big Bend Dam
Average releases past month – 20,200 cfs
Forecast average release rate – 26,300 cfs
Forecast reservoir level – 1420.6 feet

Oahe Dam
Average releases past month – 21,200 cfs
Forecast average release rate – 26,400 cfs
End-of-July reservoir level – 1598.4 feet (near July 1 level)
Forecast end-of-August reservoir level – 1597.1 feet

Garrison Dam
Average releases past month – 20,800 cfs
Current release rate – 21,000 cfs
Forecast release rate – 21,000 cfs
End-of-July reservoir level – 1838.0 feet (up 2.2 feet from July 1)
Forecast end-of-August reservoir level –1836.9 feet
Notes – Releases will be maintained at 21,000 cfs through mid-September.

Fort Peck Dam
Average releases past month – 7,600 cfs
Current release rate – 8,000 cfs
Forecast average release rate – 8,000 cfs
End-of-July reservoir level – 2222.2 feet (near July 1 level)
Forecast end-of-August reservoir level – 2221.4 feet
Notes: Releases will be maintained at 8,000 cfs through mid-September.


Hydropower:

The six mainstem power plants generated 728 million kWh of electricity in July. Typical energy generation for July is 960 million kWh. The power plants are expected to generate 7.1 billion kWh this year, compared to the long-term average of 9.4 billion kWh.

Head Start Taking Applications For 2022/2023 School Year

Monday, August 8th 2022

Glasgow Head Start is now taking applications for the 2022/2023 school year. The program runs five days a week, Monday-Friday 8:30 am to 12:30 pm.

Head Start provides breakfast and lunch- indoor and outdoor play. The Preschool is FREE. To enroll in the program children must be: Three or four years old of age by September 10th, meet income eligibility guidelines, The program can enroll 10% of the children that exceed the income guidelines if slots are available, and 10% of slots are made available for children with disabilities.

If you are interested in applying, please compete an application. Applications can be picked up at Glasgow Head Start-839 1st Ave South Glasgow MT 59230 or call (406)228-2404. ENROLLMENT is limited so ENROLL today!!!!

BLM Breaks Ground On Grub Dam Rehabilitation GAOA Project

Friday, August 5th 2022


Glasgow, Mont. –- Great American Outdoors Act funding is giving the Bureau of Land Management’s Grub Dam a new lease on life in Valley County, Montana.

Workers recently broke ground on a rehabilitation project to restore the 58-year-old dam, which attracts many recreational visitors to its approximately 690-surface-acre reservoir amidst more than 500,000 acres of BLM-managed lands. Located about 22 miles southwest of Glasgow, the dam also serves as a portion of Beaver Branch Road and provides critical transportation infrastructure for the public.

Grub dam is also crucial for providing a consistent water source for wildlife habitat, wildfire suppression and livestock grazing. At full pool, the reservoir can store up to 4,054.3 acre-feet of water – enough to fill more than 2000 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

Original construction of the 2,339-feet-long, 21-feet-high, earthen-filled gravity dam was completed in 1964 for the primary purpose of flood-risk reduction in the Milk River Basin. Grub reservoir also has a riparian area that provides habitat for many wildlife species. If left unrepaired, the dam posed a safety risk to the recreating public, as well as possible liability from potential flood damage to downstream access roads and grazing allotments.

The reconstruction project is helping BLM plan for the future by modernizing the dam’s infrastructure. Modernization features of the Grub Dam project include replacing the existing steel outlet works with a reinforced concrete outlet works to mitigate potential dam failure, according to Mike Borgreen, BLM’s acting Glasgow Field Office manager. And, the work involved with accomplishing that challenged normal operating budgets.

“We had to defer maintenance on the dam for several years, and thanks to GAOA funding, we now can make Grub Dam safer and better than ever,” said Borgreen.

The Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA, Public Law 116-152) was signed into law on August 4, 2020, providing major investments to address deferred maintenance needs, increase recreational access to our public lands, and conserve our lands and waters. The Grub Dam rehabilitation project is one of 13 projects in Montana designated to receive GAOA funding – https://www.blm.gov/about/laws-and-regulations/infrastructure/great-american-outdoors-act.

A $1.53-million contract to perform the work was awarded March 8, 2022, to Youderian Construction Inc., a registered small business based in Stanford, Montana.

Some of the major work items include dewatering the reservoir and construction area, excavating a portion of the existing dam embankment and foundation to remove the old outlet works, constructing the new outlet works, replacing and compacting the foundation and embankment materials, constructing a new principal spillway and restoring the road surface across the dam. Contractors will also reclaim all disturbed areas, including staging areas and temporary roads, preparing the work site for reseeding.

Work is on track for completion by the end of October.

New Record High Reached On Thursday

Friday, August 5th 2022

We had a mix of weather on Thursday in Glasgow, starting with a new record high for the date. The temperature hit 106 at the airport at 3:26 p.m., breaking the 102 mark set back in 1964.

The heat was followed by strong thunderstorms that moved through the area on Friday night. Glasgow received three hundredths of an inch of rain, and wind gusts to 49 m.p.h. There were reports of a 60 m.p.h. gust at St. Marie and Hell Creek and 68 m.p.h. at Devil's Creek Recreation Area in Garfield County.

Much cooler weather is in store for the weekend: Friday highs expected back down to the mid-eighties, and Saturday highs only to the upper sixties.

DPHHS Announces First Confirmed Case Of Monkeypox In Montana

Friday, August 5th 2022

The Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) and Flathead City-County Health Department today confirmed a single presumptive case of monkeypox virus infection in a Flathead County adult.

Initial testing was completed August 5, 2022, at the Montana State Public Health Laboratory and confirmatory testing will occur next with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

DPHHS is working closely with local public health and the patient’s health care provider to identify individuals who may have been in contact with the patient while they were infectious. The local public health jurisdiction is performing contact tracing and will communicate with individuals identified as a close contact. The patient did not require hospitalization and is isolating at home. To protect patient confidentiality, no further details related to the patient will be disclosed.

As of August 4, 2022, CDC reports 7,102 cases of monkeypox/orthopoxvirus in 48 other U.S. states. In recent months, more than 26,519 cases have been reported in 81 countries where the disease is not typically reported.

Symptoms of monkeypox can include fever, headache, muscle aches and backache, swollen lymph nodes, chills, exhaustion, and a rash that can look like pimples or blisters that appear on the face, inside the mouth, and on other parts of the body.

The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks and most people get better on their own without treatment. At times, monkeypox can cause scars from the sores, the development of secondary infections, such as pneumonia, or other complications.

The virus does not easily spread between people with casual contact, but transmission can occur through contact with infectious sores and body fluids; contaminated items, such as clothing or bedding; or through respiratory droplets associated with prolonged face-to-face contact.

“Early recognition of the characteristic monkeypox rash by patients and clinicians is necessary to minimize transmission of this virus,” said DPHHS acting State Medical Officer Dr. Maggie Cook-Shimanek. “Anyone with symptoms of monkeypox should isolate from others and immediately consult a healthcare provider.”

Because monkeypox transmission requires close and prolonged contact, close-knit social networks have been particularly impacted.

There is no treatment specifically for monkeypox. But because monkeypox and smallpox viruses are closely related, antiviral drugs (such as tecovirimat) and vaccines developed to protect against smallpox may be used to prevent and treat monkeypox virus infections. The need for treatment will depend on how sick someone gets or whether they are likely to get severely ill. DPHHS is pre-positioning a supply of tecovirimat in the state for use, if necessary. CDC does not recommend widespread vaccination against monkeypox at this time. However, vaccination may be recommended for some people who have been exposed to the monkeypox virus.

According to the CDC, the monkeypox virus is spreading mostly through close, intimate contact with someone who has monkeypox.

Montanans can take steps to prevent getting monkeypox.

Anyone with a rash that looks like monkeypox should talk to their healthcare provider, even if they don’t think they had contact with someone who has monkeypox.

A person who is sick with monkeypox should isolate at home. If they have an active rash or other symptoms, they should be in a separate room or area from other family members and pets, when possible.

To learn more about this virus, visit the CDC website here https://www.cdc.gov/poxvirus/monkeypox/.

DPHHS has also launched a new monkeypox website here at (mt.gov).

Strong Thunderstorm Expected To Hit The Glasgow Area This Evening

Thursday, August 4th 2022

A strong thunderstorm system is expected to move through the Glasgow area between 6 and 6:30 p.m. tonight. The thunderstorms created wind gusts over 50mph earlier this afternoon in Fergus County.

COVID Cases Down To Eighteen In Valley County

Thursday, August 4th 2022

From the Valley County Health Department:
Since our update on July 11, we have added 6 new COVID positive persons and have 18 persons currently active. We are going the right direction!

Free at-home COVID tests are back in stock at VCHD and 5th Avenue Pharmacy. Stay healthy, Valley County!

Drought Conditions Continue

Thursday, August 4th 2022

OMAHA, Neb. – While the Missouri River basin has seen improved runoff for two consecutive months, it is not enough to overcome the long-term drought persisting in much of the basin.

July runoff in the Missouri River basin above Sioux City, Iowa was 3.2 million acre-feet, which is 98% of average and 0.7 MAF more than was forecast last month. This has led to an annual runoff forecast of 20.6 MAF, which is 80% of average and 0.6 MAF higher than last month’s forecast.

“As expected, reservoir inflows in July have been declining due to the warmer and drier conditions in the upper Missouri River Basin,” said John Remus, chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Missouri River Basin Water Management Division. “Per the July 1 System storage check, navigation support was increased slightly to 500 cubic feet per second above minimum-service levels. The navigation support season will be 3 days shorter than normal per the guidance in the Master Manual,” added Remus.

USACE will evaluate lower Missouri River flow conditions to set Gavins Point releases to ensure that flows at the four downstream navigation target locations will be at or above the target levels.
“The monthly study indicates that the winter release from Gavins Point, which is based on the September 1 System storage check, will likely be at a minimum rate of 12,000 cfs,” added Remus.

System storage peaked on July 20 at 52.1 MAF. System storage on August 1 was 51.8 MAF, 4.3 MAF below the base of the Annual Flood Control and Multiple Use Zone. “System storage is expected to continue to decline further into the Carryover Multiple Use Zone during the remainder of 2022 as we make releases during the drier summer and fall periods to meet the authorized purposes,” said Remus.

Drought Conditions:
Overall drought conditions across the basin changed little during the month of July. According to the National Drought Mitigation Center, approximately 62% of the Missouri River basin is currently experiencing some form of abnormally dry or drought conditions, with 6% being extreme or exceptional drought. The seasonal drought outlook, which extends through the end of October, shows drought conditions will persist and expand across the lower basin. Drought information can be viewed at: https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/.

Navigation:
Gavins Point Dam releases will be set to provide navigation flow support at a level 500 cfs above minimum service at all four target locations (Sioux City, Omaha, Nebraska City, and Kansas City). Flow targets may be missed to conserve water if there is no commercial navigation in a given reach. The navigation flow support season will be 3 days less than the normal 8-month season.

Mountain Snowpack:
Mountain snowpack in the upper Missouri River Basin was completely melted by the first week of July. The mountain snowpack peaked above Fort Peck on April 29 at 85% of average, while the mountain snowpack in the Fort Peck to Garrison reach peaked on May 3 at 92% of average. Mountain snowpack normally peaks near April 17.

The mountain snowpack graphics can be viewed at: http://go.usa.gov/xARQC.

Monthly Water Management Conference Calls
Water management calls include an update on the Missouri River mainstem reservoir system operations. The next call for 2022 will be held Thursday, August 4. All calls are recorded in their entirety and are available to the public on our website at https://go.usa.gov/xARQv.

Reservoir Forecasts:
• Gavins Point Dam
o Average releases past month – 22,600 cfs
o Current release rate – 25,000 cfs
o Forecast release rate –26,300 cfs
o End-of-July reservoir level – 1206.2 feet
o Forecast end-of-August reservoir level – 1206.5 feet
o Notes: The Gavins Point release will be adjusted to provide navigation flow support 500 cfs above minimum service on the lower Missouri River.

• Fort Randall Dam
o Average releases past month – 21,700 cfs
o End-of-July reservoir level – 1354.8 feet
o Forecast end-of-August reservoir level – 1355.1 feet
o Notes: Releases will be adjusted as necessary to maintain the desired reservoir elevation at Gavins Point and to back up Gavins Point releases.

• Big Bend Dam
o Average releases past month – 20,200 cfs
o Forecast average release rate – 26,300 cfs
o Forecast reservoir level – 1420.6 feet

• Oahe Dam
o Average releases past month – 21,200 cfs
o Forecast average release rate – 26,400 cfs
o End-of-July reservoir level – 1598.4 feet (near July 1 level)
o Forecast end-of-August reservoir level – 1597.1 feet

• Garrison Dam
o Average releases past month – 20,800 cfs
o Current release rate – 21,000 cfs
o Forecast release rate – 21,000 cfs
o End-of-July reservoir level – 1838.0 feet (up 2.2 feet from July 1)
o Forecast end-of-August reservoir level –1836.9 feet
o Notes – Releases will be maintained at 21,000 cfs through mid-September.

Fort Peck Dam
o Average releases past month – 7,600 cfs
o Current release rate – 8,000 cfs
o Forecast average release rate – 8,000 cfs
o End-of-July reservoir level – 2222.2 feet (near July 1 level)
o Forecast end-of-August reservoir level – 2221.4 feet
o Notes: Releases will be maintained at 8,000 cfs through mid-September.

The forecast reservoir releases and elevations discussed above are not definitive. Additional precipitation, lack of precipitation or other circumstances could cause adjustments to the reservoir release rates.

Hydropower:
The six mainstem power plants generated 728 million kWh of electricity in July. Typical energy generation for July is 960 million kWh. The power plants are expected to generate 7.1 billion kWh this year, compared to the long-term average of 9.4 billion kWh.
To view the detailed three-week release forecast for the mainstem dams, go to https://go.usa.gov/xARQB.

Glasgow Radar Down For Equipment Upgrade

Thursday, August 4th 2022

Beginning August 4th, 2022, the KGGW WSR-88D radar operated by the NOAA National Weather Service in Glasgow, Montana will be down for approximately seven days for the replacement of the generator, fuel tanks, and accompanying components. This activity is important to support the radar’s operation during periods of commercial power outages, specifically when hazardous weather is present.

This generator update is the fifth major project of the NEXRAD Service Life Extension Program, a series of upgrades and replacements that will keep our nation’s radars viable into the 2030’s. NOAA National Weather Service, the United States Air Force, and the Federal Aviation Administration are investing $150 million in the seven year program. The first project was the installation of the new signal processor and the second project was the transmitter refurbishment. The two remaining projects are the refurbishment of the pedestal and equipment shelters. The Service Life Extension Program will complete in 2023.

During the downtime, adjacent radars include: KTFX (Great Falls, MT), KBLX
(Billings, MT), KBIS (Bismarck, ND), and KMBX (Minot AFB). For direct access to
any of these surrounding radar sites, go to the following web page:
https://radar.weather.gov/

The KGGW WSR-88D is part of a network of 159 operational radars. The Radar
Operations Center in Norman, Oklahoma, provides lifecycle management and
support for all WSR-88Ds.

For a radar mosaic loop of eastern Montana, please visit: https://radar.weather.gov
The National Weather Service in Glasgow, MT can be found on social media at
https://www.facebook.com/NWSGlasgow and https://twitter.com/NWSGlasgow.

Heat Advisory And Red Flag Warning Continue Through Tonight

Thursday, August 4th 2022

The National Weather Service has issued a Red Flag Warning and a Heat Advisory in effect until 9 p.m. Temperatures are predicted to hit 103 this afternoon in Glasgow; downtown, the temperature was already at 98 degrees at the KLTZ/Mix-93 studios at 11:30 a.m.

How hot has it been in eastern Montana? In Glasgow, the temperature has reached 90°F 24 times this summer and 20 times in Glendive. It has hit 100° 4 times for both locations and today should be the fifth time. The record high for today's date in Glasgow is 105, set back in 1949.

Valley County Commissioners Approve $500,000 Appropriation To Valley View Nursing Home

Wednesday, August 3rd 2022

On Wednesday the Valley County Commissioners approved another $500,000 appropriation to Valley View Nursing Home.

Earlier this year, the Commissioners had approved an initial $500,000 appropriation to Valley View with the thought they would appropriate another $500,000 later in the year.

The money being appropriated by Valley County comes from American Rescue Plan Act money which Valley County received from the federal government during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This money is separate from the levy approved by Valley County Voters in June. That money comes from property taxes paid by Valley County residents and is $300,000 per year for 3 years which also will go to Valley View Nursing Home.

State 1 Fire Restrictions In Place For Phillips County

Wednesday, August 3rd 2022

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials say stage 1 fire restrictions are now in place in Big Horn, Musselshell, Yellowstone and Phillips counties.

Those restrictions mean campfires are not allowed, smoking is only allowed in an enclosed vehicle or building or a developed recreation site.

FWP released the following information:

Big Horn, Musselshell, Yellowstone and Phillips counties are in stage 1 fire restrictions. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks follows the county’s lead in placing fire restrictions on its properties within a particular county.

Under stage 1 restrictions, building, maintaining, attending or using a fire or campfire at FWP sites is not allowed. People may only smoke within an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site or while stopped in an area at least 3 feet in diameter cleared of flammable materials. People may cook on a liquid petroleum gas or propane stove that can be turned on and off.

Exceptions to these restrictions include the picnic areas at Chief Plenty Coups State Park in Bighorn County and Lake Elmo in Yellowstone County, where cooking fires are allowed in designated barbecues.

The following FWP sites in Phillips County are under these fire restrictions: Cole Ponds FAS, Bjornberg Bridge FAS, Alkali Creek FAS, Cree Crossing WMA, Sleeping Buffalo WMA, and Dodson Dam WMA.

These restrictions at FWP sites will be in place until further notice. FWP urges people to use caution while they are out recreating due to dry conditions and fire dangers.

Schools Will Not Be Providing Free Meals To All Students This School Year

Wednesday, August 3rd 2022

The start of the school year is right around the corner, and with it comes some changes.

As life returns to normalcy following the COVID-19 pandemic, so does the public school lunch program. Starting this year, it will once again be the parents’ responsibility to cover paying for their child’s meals.

For the past two years, the USDA provided waivers to public school districts, allowing them to cover all their meals for free. That benefit was not renewed for the 2022-23 school year.

In April, Senator Jon Tester (D-MT) and other democrats introduced legislation that would have extended the waivers, but there has not been any movement on the proposal.

“The Senator’s Support Kids Not Red Tape Act would provide a longer-term solution that would keep kids fed year-round at no cost to parents. He’ll keep pushing that through the Senate,” a Tester spokesperson said in a statement.

For now, the Glasgow School District recommends applying for free/reduced meals even if you’re not sure if you’ll qualify.

For more specific information on your school's meal policy, contact the school district office.

Fort Peck Tribal Executive Board Passes Resolution Providing Financial Help For Fort Peck Tribal Youth

Wednesday, August 3rd 2022

$600 Resolution, for ages 3-18, fully enrolled Fort Peck Tribal members, was passed Tuesday to help with school clothes.

Local checks will be handed out tentatively on Thursday, August 4, 2022, 8:00 A.M., at Poplar, Montana at the Cultural Center. All off-reservation checks will be mailed out. If you cannot pick up your check(s) on this day, they will be mailed out to you as well. Also, if you have any Custody Issues with your children, please bring your legal Custody Papers.

Glasgow City Council Notes

Tuesday, August 2nd 2022

The Glasgow City Council met on Monday. Here are the decisions made at the meeting:

The Council gave final approval for a 2% increase in water and sewer rates for city customers. The base rate for residential water will increase to $28.71 in October. The sewer base rate will increase to $45.75 in October for all users of city sewer.

Approval was given to pay T & R Trucking $22,193.10 per month for a yearly total of of $266,317.16. T & R Trucking provides garbage pickup for the City of Glasgow.

Approved writing off $886.34 in delinquent water bills.

Approved hiring Meaghan Schultz for a part-time administrative position in the city office.

Tabled a water committee recommendation to allow Russell and Brianna Leader to connect to city services without annexation.

Hired David George as a contracted consultant to the water department on an as needed basis.

"Bat Walk" Scheduled For August 5th

Tuesday, August 2nd 2022

Pictured: Holden Kloker with a bat detector

FORT PECK – What do bats do at night? Aerobatics! Join Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service for a night walk learning about and observing these fascinating creatures.

The Bat Walk will take place beginning at the Downstream Campground Amphitheater, starting at 8:30 p.m. on Friday, August 5.

To kick things off, FWP Region 6 biologist Nikie Hussey will deliver a presentation on bats and their importance in our ecosystem. This will be immediately followed by a “bat walk” around the Downstream Nature Trail in search of bats as they begin their nighttime hunting. FWP will provide a variety of “bat detecting” devices so you will be able to “hear” the bats hunting and navigating, and other equipment to “see” their echolocation calls on iPads!

In addition, the Fort Peck Interpretive Center will have other bat-themed activities going on over the weekend, including making bat origami, exploring myths and facts about bats, and learning about bat anatomy.

Everyone is welcome to the bat walk, but we encourage any youngsters under the age of 12 to be accompanied by an adult. Some suggested items to bring include a flashlight/headlamp or glow sticks, bug spray, and sturdy walking shoes. We will see you there!

FWP Seeking Comments On Proposed Ice Fishing Contests

Tuesday, August 2nd 2022

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is seeking public comment on ice fishing contests proposed for the 2022-2023 season.

Participants must comply with state fishing regulations, including daily and possession limits.

Applications for fishing contests may be approved, approved with conditions, or denied. Conditions placed on contests may help to minimize fish mortality, regulate harvest, reduce user conflicts, and/or require additional access site maintenance when needed.

Local proposed contests include:

The Central MT Perch Derby on January 14th-15th on East Fork Reservoir near Lewistown
The Woodsy Cup on February 4th on Ackley Lake
The Valier Area Development Corp Ice Fishing Derby on January 14th on Lake Frances
The Western Bar Larry Krone Memorial Fishing Derby on January 21st on Willow Creek Reservoir
The 23rd Chamber Ice Fishing Derby on January 28th on Fort Peck
The Chinook Rod & Gun Club Ice Fishing Derby on February 4th at Dry Fork Reservoir
The Fresno Ice Fishing Tournament on January 2nd at Fresno Reservoir
The Hell Creek Marina Tournament on February 11th at Hell Creek Bay on Fort Peck
The Ice Classic Fishing Tournament on January 28th at Nelson Reservoir

Information on the proposed fishing contests can be found on the FWP website or by calling 406-444-2449. All comments must be received by September 14th.

Comments may be mailed to FWP Fisheries Division, Attn: Fishing Contest, P.O. Box 200701, Helena, MT 59620-0701, or emailed to fwpfish@mt.gov.

National Weather Service Reports Glasgow Had 8th Warmest July On Record

Tuesday, August 2nd 2022

Tester Secures $57 Million For Broadband Access

Monday, August 1st 2022

Tester Secures $57 Million for Broadband in Rural Montana Communities and Indian Country
Funding will comes from USDA’s ReConnect Program

(U.S. Senate) – In his continued effort to close the digital divide in rural Montana communities, U.S. Senator Jon Tester announced that he secured $57 million in U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Utilities Service ReConnect grants for broadband expansion in rural areas and Indian Country. The grants, which were funded through Fiscal Year 2021 appropriations, will go to the Blackfoot Telephone Cooperative in Ravalli County, Nemont in Roosevelt and Valley Counties and the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, and the Reservation Telephone Cooperative in Richland and Wibaux Counties.

“Limited access to broadband networks is one of the top issues facing Montana’s rural communities – and one that was only worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic when folks were forced to rely on technology more than ever before,” Tester said. “These resources will not only make it easier for folks across the Treasure State to stay connected, but they’ll also help small businesses expand and create jobs, provide rural students with access to high quality education, and allow folks to access affordable telehealth services instead of driving hundreds of miles to the doctor. I’m proud to have secured these investments that will strengthen our communities and grow our economy.”

A breakdown of the projects can be found below:

· $4 million to Blackfoot Telephone Cooperative (Ravalli County) – will serve 89 people, five businesses, and 47 farms.

· $24.5 million to Nemont (Roosevelt and Valley Counties and the Fort Peck Indian Reservation) – will serve 1,068 people, 25 businesses, and 282 farms.

· $18.5 million to Reservation Telephone Cooperative (Richland and Wibaux Counties and three counties in North Dakota) – will serve 67 businesses, 4 public schools, and 91 farms.

As a farmer in an area without cell phone service, Tester has been a Montana’s leading champion for broadband expansion to rural communities. In December of 2018, he helped secure $600 million to launch the ReConnect Program to expand high-speed internet in rural communities across the country.

Tester has also aggressively pushed the FCC to improve broadband access in rural America, and has asked the FCC to take concrete steps to increase the accuracy of broadband maps. In 2019, Tester introduced the Broadband Data Improvement Act, which would increase funding for broadband buildout in rural areas by improving the accuracy of broadband coverage map.

Last year, Tester worked across the aisle to negotiate his bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), which included $65 billion to deploy broadband access to communities lacking internet access and affordable online connectivity.

Hot, Dry Conditions Today and Tuesday

Monday, August 1st 2022

The National Weather Service has issued Red Flag Warning from noon to 9 p.m. both today and on Tuesday for very hot and dry conditions.

The high today is expected over 100 in Glasgow, and near 100 tomorrow. Combined with winds northwest 15-25mph today and 20-30mph tomorrow, along with low humidity dropping to near 5%, area residents are asked to be very vigilant.

There's also a heat advisory from 10 a.m. til 9 p.m. and a lake wind advisory from noon til 9 p.m.

Glasgow City Council To Meet On Monday

Monday, August 1st 2022

The Glasgow City Council will meet Monday afternoon at 4:30 at the council chambers in the civic center.

There will be a second reading of the ordinance regarding new residential and commercial sewer charges in Glasgow, and a first reading of an ordinance regarding amendment of Glasgow's building codes.

Also on the agenda, a request to hire Meaghan Schultz for a part-time administration position, and a water committee recommendation to hire Dave George as a contracted consultant to the water department on an as needed basis.

There will also be an updated on the swimming pool from Kaden Bedwell of Interstate Engineering, and a levee safety report.

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Hunter Education Course Is August 8th

Monday, August 1st 2022

The Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Hunter Education in-person course date has been set for Monday, August 8th in Glasgow.

All hunter education classes are free of charge. In-person, instructor-led hunter education classroom courses are available to anyone age 10 & older. Students must be registered prior to attending a class.

To find an in-person course & register, go to https://fwp.mt.gov/education/hunter-education. Make sure to print, read & sign any necessary paperwork ahead of the class. Directions & other detailed information can be found on the registration page.

Cub Scout Day Camp Was Saturday

Monday, August 1st 2022

Cub Scout Day Camp was held at the Boy Scout Park near Fort Peck on Saturday July 30, with about 30 adults and youth attending from Malta, Glasgow, and Nashua.

Montana Council BSA district executive Dave Snyder from Lewistown enlisted lots of volunteers to put this event on. Activities included Slingshot, B-B’s, nature walk, fishing, STEM activities, crafts, and assembling simple boats to race in rain gutters filled with water.

The youth were divided into groups and rotated every half hour between the different stations. At the STEM station, Cindee Parker had the youth make Simple Popsickle Stick Catapults, Oobleck – a Non-Newtonian Fluid, and Twirling Toys.

If you want to get involved, enroll or volunteer, contact Dave Snyder at (406) 366-9055 or Mike Carney at (406) 654-4350.

Yard Of The Week

Monday, August 1st 2022

This week's Yard Of The Week award goes to Ed and Phoebe Schack at 926 6th Ave South in Glasgow

Nemont Telephone Receiving Nearly $25 Million To Deploy High Speed Internet In Roosevelt And Valley Counties

Friday, July 29th 2022

The federal government is pledging $401 million in grants and loans to expand the reach and improve the speed of internet for rural residents, tribes and businesses in remote parts of 11 states from Alaska to Arkansas.

U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack told reporters Wednesday, ahead of the Thursday announcement, that farmers, store owners, schoolchildren and people seeking telehealth medical checkups will benefit from the ReConnect and Telecommunications Infrastructure Loan and Loan Guarantee programs.

“Connectivity is critical to economic success in rural America,” Vilsack said in a statement tallying the number of people who could be helped at about 31,000 in states also including Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, North Dakota and Texas.

The statement said the Department of Agriculture plans more spending on high-speed internet in coming weeks as part of a $65 billion Biden administration plan to expand affordable, high-speed internet to all communities in the U.S.

Vilsack said the programs will particularly help residents in what he called “persistent poverty counties,” where he said most have access to broadband, but about one in three don’t have high-speed networks needed for telemedicine and distance learning.

He said the goal was “to do what is necessary to make sure every rural resident, regardless of ZIP code has access to affordable, reliable high-speed internet.”

The investment includes almost $48 million in Montana. This announcement includes a group of investments from the ReConnect Program, and an award funded through USDA’s Telecommunications Infrastructure Loan and Loan Guarantee program.

The Department will make additional investments for rural high-speed internet later this summer, including ReConnect Program funding through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, which provides a historic $65 billion investment to expand affordable, high-speed internet to all communities across the U.S.

“The lack of access to high-speed internet and inability to connect are issues we see agricultural producers, business owners, and communities struggling with across Montana,” stated USDA Rural Development State Director, Kathleen Williams. “We are excited to be part of the solution by providing ReConnect funding which will allow for the infrastructure and equipment needed to make high-speed internet available and affordable to 2,298 people, 97 businesses, four schools, 420 farms and five rural counties throughout the state.”

As part of Thursday's announcement:

Nemont Telephone Cooperative, Inc. is receiving $24,972,692 to deploy a fiber-to-the-premises network. This network will connect 1,058 people, 25 businesses, and 282 farms to high-speed internet in Roosevelt and Valley counties. Nemont Telephone Cooperative will make high-speed internet affordable by offering a suite of broadband services designed to be simple and target residents and businesses on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. All services offered are symmetrical and capable of supporting multiple simultaneous users for many applications including teleworking and remote learning. This project will serve the socially vulnerable communities in Roosevelt County and on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation.

Verizon-Cellular Plus Giving Away Backpacks Filled With School Supplies On Saturday

Friday, July 29th 2022

Verizon-Cellular Plus in Glasgow will be giving away free backpacks filled with school supplies on Saturday, July 30 from 10 am to noon.

“We are honored to give back to our local community by helping students kick off the school year with a brand-new backpack,” stated President, Adam Kimmet. “We want to ease some of the stress that can be placed on families while trying to get the school supplies they need. It’s really rewarding to see the kids parade out of the store, excited to show off their new backpack and ready to start the school year prepared and confident.”

The Verizon-Cellular Plus Backpack to School program incorporates employees, customers, and vendor partners. An internal employee donation program was organized while stores are also accepting donations from their guests in order to help as many families as possible. Donations stay local so each backpack that is donated at a specific location will be distributed to children in that same area.

No purchase is necessary to receive a backpack, but a child must be present with an adult to claim their free backpack. There are a limited number available and will be distributed while supplies last.

Cellular Plus is located at 54147 US-2, next to the Glasgow Chamber of Commerce.

Cellular Plus is a Verizon authorized retailer, founded in 1998, and headquartered in Billings, MT.

BLM Issues Final Decision Allowing American Prairie To Graze Bison On Over 63,000 Acres In Phillips County

Friday, July 29th 2022

https://dailymontanan.com/2022/07/28/blm-gives-green-light-to-american-prairie-grazing-plan-while-gianforte-blasts-decision/

The Bureau of Land Management has issued its final decision to allow American Prairie to graze bison on 63,500 acres of land in Phillips County.

Some of the land within the acreage is state land which is managed by the federal government, and the BLM’s decision has drawn criticism from Gov. Greg Gianforte and Attorney General Austin Knudsen, both of whom have been staunch critics of the conservation organization, but who have refused to visit the operations. Montana has 5,830 acres of land included in the parcel, or roughly nine percent of the total grazing area.

The decision clears the way for American Prairie to continue to allow bison to graze on federal land set aside for grazing in north central Montana. The state has previously objected to the decision, saying the federal agency doesn’t have the authority to substitute cattle grazing for bison grazing, a legal theory which American Prairie has rebutted and the BLM has rejected.

The decision released on Thursday means that American Prairie will gradually increase its bison herd from 800 to around 1,000 in the next three years.

“By comparison, the majority of American Prairie’s land base is leased out to local cattle ranchers and supports more than 10,000 head of cattle,” the organization said.

The finding, issued by the Malta Field Office of the BLM, said that bison grazing will lead to improved land health and new jobs facilitated by American Prairie’s growth, as well as bringing in additional tourism dollars to the state.

Previously environmental assessments of American Prairie’s proposal also found that the bison grazing would not impact the land in any significant way. In fact, the BLM praised the proposal, “Those areas being grazed by bison will experience improvements to vegetative communities, diversified vegetation and an increase in native plant species.”

In a press release put out after the decision, Gianforte rehashed the argument he’d made last year.

“As we review this decision, we share Montanans’ frustration with the BLM’s woeful and repeated failures to properly engage Montanans and act within the bounds of its authority on this issue,” Gianforte said.

He said the state is looking at next steps after reviewing the decision, and blasted the agency for ignoring “repeated requests from state officials for full public engagement.”

However, Malta Field Manager Tom Darrington pushed back against Gianforte’s assertion in the final decision, noting several different ways the federal agency engaged the public, including a public scoping period that lasted for a month from April 9 to May 9, 2018.

The BLM also held a series of in-person, open-house style meetings held between April 9 and 12, 2018. Those were held in the north-central communities of Winnett, Winifred, Malta and Glasgow. Darrington also said requests to extend the public comment period was also granted from July 1 through Sept. 28, 2021. The agency also noted nearly 400 letters received by the agency, commenting on the proposal, including 18 letters of protest.

“Given the level of public interest in the proposal, BLM initiated an increased effort to engage local and state cooperators and the interested public to the greatest extent possible. Consultation, cooperation and coordination requirements were met, or exceeded prior to (issuing this decision),” Darrington wrote. “Though the proposal to allow domestic indigenous livestock grazing conflicts with views and opinions expressed among some users of public lands, such unfavorable views of the proposal itself do not constitute scientific controversy, disagreement about the nature of effects, or provide evidence that the project is not in conformance to BLM’s statutory and regulatory requirements.”

Valley County Commissioners Approve Putting Marijuana Excise Tax On November Ballot

Thursday, July 28th 2022

The Valley County Commissioners on Wednesday voted to put a local 3% excise tax on the sales of medical marijuana and adult use marijuana on the November ballot.

The voters of Valley County will decide whether Valley County will add an additional tax on the sales of marijuana. The State of Montana has a 20% tax on the sales of recreational marijuana and a 4% tax on the sales of medical marijuana.

If approved by the voters of Valley County, the 3% tax would go into effect 90 days after being approved. The vote will take place on November 8th.

50% of the revenue from the tax would go to Valley County, 45% would be apportioned to municipalities in Valley County on the basis of the ratio of the population of the city or town to the total county population. The remaining 5% would go to the Montana Department of Revenue.

In June, the total amount of sales of adult-use and medical marijuana in Valley County was $137,624.

Fish kill documented in the Milk River and Rock Creek

Wednesday, July 27th 2022

Fish, Wildlife & Parks fisheries biologists investigated a report of a fish kill on Rock Creek and the Milk River north of Hinsdale. According to the concerned landowner, who reported the kill to FWP on July 13, “Lots and lots” of dead fish were observed in the Milk River around the confluence with Rock Creek.

Upon investigation, biologists first observed dead fish downstream of the confluence of the Milk River and Rock Creek. Further searching found dead fish 9.5 miles from the mouth of Rock Creek up to the Rock Creek Dam, although the full upstream extent was not determined. No dead fish were observed in the Milk River upstream of the confluence with Rock Creek.

“Whatever killed these fish was highly toxic as it killed carp, bullheads, catfish and a host of warm water fish species that are tolerate poor water quality,” says regional fish manager Steve Dalbey. Species observed include walleye, northern pike, carp, catfish, goldeye, bullhead, shorthead redhorse, river carpsucker, white sucker, freshwater drum, and buffalo.

Although the source of the fish kill was not determined, the timing and rate of decomposition of the fish suggest that the kill may have occurred July 9-11. The kill may be related to the high intensity rain events that occurred on July 8 and 9. According to the National Weather Service, 0.5 inches of rain fell the evening of July 8 and another 0.25 to 1.0 inches of rain fell the evening of the July 9.

Live fish were collected in the area at the time of the investigation indicating that the event was acute in nature and no abnormalities were observed.

“All of this points to a toxicant that may have entered Rock Creek above the Rock Creek dam during the rain events of July 8 and 9 and moved through the river,” added Dalbey. “It’s difficult to pinpoint where this occurred unless more fish are found in and around the affected reach of river,” adds Dalbey.

FWP will follow up with fish collection from the affected area to look at possible contaminants in the fish tissue. Currently there are no fish consumption advisories.

If members of the public have any information on what may have led to this fish kill or have other questions or concerns, please call your local FWP office:
Glasgow: 406-228-3700
Havre: 406-265-6177

Public scoping meetings being held across northeast Montana for new Elk Management Plan

Wednesday, July 27th 2022

Public scoping meetings are being held across northeast Montana to seek the public’s assistance in helping to revise the statewide Elk Management Plan last adopted in 2005.

Malta-Malta high school, August 9, from 6-8 p.m.
Glasgow-Cottonwood Inn, August 11, from 6-8 p.m.
Havre-Best Western Great Northern Inn, August 16, from 6-8 p.m.

More information and dates and locations for these and other meetings across the state can be found here or go to https://fwp.mt.gov/aboutfwp/public-comment-opportunities/elk-plan-scoping.

FWP is in the process of revising the statewide Elk Management Plan last adopted in 2005. At this step in the revision, FWP is seeking input on the existing elk population objectives and local elk management challenges that should be considered in the update. Input gathered during the local meetings will be used with information obtained at the statewide scale to develop a draft statewide Elk Management Plan.

In addition, a public comment period will be open from June 20 to Oct. 15. Comments can be submitted online or emailed to FWPWLD@mt.gov.

Once the draft Elk Management Plan has been developed and released, there will be additional public comment opportunities offered.

FWP ensures that its meetings are fully accessible to persons with disabilities. To request special accommodations for this meeting, or any questions, please call your local FWP office:

Glasgow: 406-228-3700
Havre: 406-265-6177

Bayer Fund And Valley County Farmers Team Up To Direct Donations To Rural Nonprofit

Wednesday, July 27th 2022

In 2022, Bayer Fund doubled America’s Farmers Grow Communities
individual donations from $2,500 to $5,000.

• The America’s Farmers Grow Communities program, a Bayer Fund program, partners with farmers to provide grants to local nonprofits and schools to help their communities.

• Through the program, farmers enroll for the chance to direct a $5,000 donation to a local eligible nonprofit organization or school of their choice.

• Farmers will once again be able to enter for a chance to direct an America’s Farmers Grow Communities donation on August 1, 2022.

Local farmers Margareta(Maggan) and Darrell Walstad recently directed a $5,000 Bayer Fund America’s Farmers Grow Communities donation to The Valley County Community Pool Campaign. The VALCO Pool Committee will use the funds in coordination with the building of the new pool to enhance the health and wellness components such as lap swim, aerobics classes and open swim.
“The Committee is so excited about this donation, as every bit helps us get closer and closer to our end goal of seeing a new pool built for the community. We’re very appreciative to Darrell and Maggan for going the extra mile to apply for these funds on our behalf.” said, Taylor Zerbe, FMDH Marketing Coordinator and VALCO Pool Campaign Secretary.

In 2022, Bayer Fund revamped America’s Farmers Grow Communities program, making it easier for farmers across the country to find and fund the organizations and institutions that keep their communities thriving. This included doubling the individual donations to $5,000, up from $2,500 in previous years to provide a greater impact to local rural communities.

For more than a decade, Grow Communities has partnered with farmers to direct funds to programs and organizations that contribute to their communities’ health and vibrancy, such as food banks, schools and youth agriculture programs. Since the America’s Farmers programs began in 2010, the initiatives have awarded nearly $65 million to such programs.

“Each year we hear from several nonprofit and school leaders, as well as farmers, about the ways Grow Communities has made a difference,” said Al Mitchell, Bayer Fund president. “Bayer Fund is proud to work side-by-side with farmers to identify local nonprofit organizations and schools that are improving rural communities in the areas of health and wellness, food and nutrition, and STEM and ag education.”

Farmers can enroll for the opportunity to direct a 2023 Grow Communities donation starting on August 1, 2022. To learn more about the enrollment process and how America’s Farmers programs are making an impact, visit www.Americasfarmers.com.

To see donation total updates and upcoming events, visit The Valley County Community Pool Campaign’s website at www.valcopool.com or follow us on social media @valcopool.

Seussical Premiers At Fort Peck Summer Theatre

Wednesday, July 27th 2022

Back by popular demand, The Cat in the Hat, Horton the Elephant and all the citizens of Whoville come to life on the FPST stage! Featuring special effects, infectious music and a TON of heart, this high energy musical based on the imaginative world of Dr. Seuss, is perfect for the entire family.

Local youth actor Felixe Becker stars as JoJo, alongside company members Jay Michael Roberts as The Cat in the Hat, Haley Alexa Court as Gertrude McFuzz, Andy Meyers as Horton, Colleen Rosbarsky as Mayzie La Bird, Rachel Franke as Sour Kangaroo, Treyson Sherk as General Schmitz, Shy Iverson as The Grinch and Bryan Songy & Sydney Hayward as the Whoville Mayor and his wife.

The cast of 30 also features local cast members Lizzie Peters, Chase Tarum, Dan Hance, Brooke Watson, Tommi Prewett, Codi Donniaquo, Jonathon Osbourne, Sabri Sims, Kolbi Ross, Tanner Smith, Abigail Peterson, Mariah Cathey, and Annika Smith.

Seussical runs from July 29 – August 14; Friday & Saturday @ 7:30pm and Sunday @ 4:00pm.

For tickets go to www.fortpecktheatre.org or call 406-526-9943. Theatre Box office hours are 1-5 pm, Thursdays-Sundays. FPFAC Office 406-228-9216.


Following Seussical, the 2022 Season concludes with:
• Wait Until Dark: August 19 – September 4

Three Fatalities Result Of Two-Vehicle Accident Near Nashua

Monday, July 25th 2022

At approximately 10:45 in the morning, on Saturday, July 23, 2022, a two-vehicle accident occurred at the intersection of US Highway 2 and MT Highway 117, near the town of Nashua, Montana.

Nine individuals were involved, two adults in one vehicle traveling east, on US Highway 2 and one adult with six children, of varying ages, were in the vehicle entering the intersection from MT Highway 117. Multiple first responders converged on the scene and US Highway 2 was shut down for a short period of time.

The three adults were pronounced dead at the scene of the accident. Their names are Robert and Helen Heikens of Nashua and Lorena Mast of Nashua. One child was listed as being in critical condition. All the children were transported to the local emergency department for further evaluation.

The Montana Highway Patrol is investigating the accident scene.

I personally want to thank the first responders, officers, and community for their life saving efforts that were professionally exhibited at the accident scene and for the continuing efforts to support the children affected by this tragic event. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families and friends of the deceased and for healing and peace for the children involved.

Sheriff Tom Boyer

Army Corps Of Engineers Improving Access To Bonetrail Low Water Boat Ramp

Monday, July 25th 2022

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) will be improving access to the Bonetrail low water boat ramp on the north side of Fort Peck Lake, 60 miles west of Fort Peck, MT. Throughout the week of July 25, 2022, trucks will be hauling gravel from a stockpile at the top of Bonetrail Road down to the reservoir. This is a single lane road with few pull outs. Drivers are urged to look ahead and use caution.

Elevated lake levels since 2011 caused the lower ends of many boat ramps to become covered in silt making it difficult or impossible to launch a boat as water recedes. USACE will work throughout the summer to retain public reservoir access as water levels change.

Certain Fort Peck boat ramps are expected to retain good boat access during 2022 with minimal maintenance, including: Fort Peck Marina, Duck Creek Fishing Access Site, Pines, Rock Creek Fishing Access Site Low Water Ramp. Recreationists are encouraged to check local conditions prior to their visit.

Boat ramp elevations around Fort Peck can be referenced online; however, current access may be limited due to silt deposits (https://www.nwd-mr.usace.army.mil/rcc/reports/ftpkramps.html). Current lake elevations can be found online for comparison: https://www.nwd-mr.usace.army.mil/rcc/reports/pdfs/MRBWMRiverDaily.pdf

Before traveling, confirm access conditions with USACE or the local marina. Questions may be directed to the Fort Peck Project office at (406) 526-3411. Maintenance updates also will be posted on the Fort Peck Dam and Lake Facebook page (@USACEFortPeck).

Valley County Unemployment Rate At 2.5%

Monday, July 25th 2022

The number of Montanans employed grew in June 2022 for the 26th consecutive month, reaching a new all-time high, according to data from the Montana Department of Labor and Industry and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Also in the month of June, Montana’s labor force grew to its largest level on record, and the state’s unemployment rate remained near historic lows.

“More Montanans are working than ever before, and our expanding workforce is helping job creators fill key positions across the state. Montana workers continue to benefit from strong private sector job growth,” Governor Greg Gianforte said. “Our economy continues to show strong signs of job growth, but with the federal government’s out-of-control spending, Montanans are paying higher prices for gas and groceries as inflation reached its highest level in 41 years.”

Payroll employment in Montana rose by a strong 4,400 jobs in June, with the largest gains in private sector health care, accommodation, and food service industries. In June 2022, 1,095 jobs were created, with 30,550 jobs created since Gov. Gianforte was elected in November 2020.

With 550,112 Montanans employed in June, Montana has recovered 146 percent of the jobs lost at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The unemployment rate in Valley County was 2.5% for the month of June. The labor force in Valley County grew by 93 compared to June of 2021.

Montana’s labor force continued its robust growth in June, adding roughly 1,789 workers to bring it to 564,537, a new all-time high.

For the second month in a row Montana’s labor force growth narrowly outpaced its job growth, resulting in a slight uptick in the unemployment rate for June by 0.2% to 2.6%, the third lowest rate ever recorded in Montana.

The unemployment rate for the U.S. remained at 3.6% in June.

Gasoline Prices Fall As Oil Prices Decline

Friday, July 22nd 2022

Since Monday, the national average for a gallon of regular gasoline has fallen eleven cents to $4.41. According to new data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), gas demand increased from 8.06 million b/d to 8.52 million b/d last week.

However, the rate is 800,000 b/d lower than last year and is in line with demand during the middle of July 2020, when COVID-19 measures curbed demand. Additionally, total domestic gasoline stocks increased by 3.5 million bbl to 228.4 million bbl, signaling that low demand led to growth in inventory last week. If gas demand remains low as stocks increase, alongside a continuing reduction in crude prices, drivers will likely see pump prices decline.

At the close of Wednesday’s formal trading session, WTI decreased by $1.96 to settle at $102.26. Crude prices have declined this week as the market continues to worry that weakening demand, which was expected to remain robust throughout the summer, could continue to push prices lower. Additionally, EIA reported that total domestic crude stocks decreased by 500,000 bbl to 426.6 million bbl last week, just over 13 million bbl lower than the storage level in mid-July 2021.

The nationwide average price for gasoline is $4.41 per gallon compared to $4.95 a month ago.

In Montana, the average price per gallon is $4.66 per gallon and in Valley County, the average price is $4.48 per gallon.

Glasgow Man Arrested After Disturbance Stemming From Parking Complaint

Thursday, July 21st 2022

On, 7/15/22 at around 6:30 PM, the Glasgow Police Department was notified of a serious disturbance between multiple people on Jet Drive, stemming from a parking complaint.

The caller reported that a male later identified as Jesse Isaac Chitty, 49 , of Glasgow, had come onto their driveway and pointed a handgun at the caller’s family members.

The victims had gone back inside their home and locked the door. Officers arrived on scene and interviewed everyone involved.

Chitty was arrested and booked into the Valley County Detention Center for Assault with a Weapon and Tampering / Fabricating Physical Evidence, both felony charges.

Valley County Commissioners Postpone Decision To Put Marijuana Excise Tax On Ballot

Wednesday, July 20th 2022

The Valley County Commissioners postponed a decision on a 3% excise tax on the sales of medical marijuana and adult use marijuana at a meeting on Wednesday.

Valley County Commissioners Paul Tweten and Mary Armstrong both voiced support for Resolution No. 19-2022, but wanted to have Commissioner John Fahlgren in the office to vote on the motion to approve. Fahlgren was absent for the meeting on Wednesday. Tweten and Armstrong agreed to put the item on the agenda for July, 27th.

If the commissioners approve Resolution No. 19-2022, the voters of Valley County will make the final decision on whether or not to tax the sales of marijuana in Valley County.

If approved by the commissioners and voters, the 3% tax would go into effect 90 days after being approved by voters. The vote would take place on November 8th.

50% of the revenue from the tax would go to Valley County, 45% would be apportioned to municipalities in Valley County on the basis of the ratio of the population of the city or town to the total county population. The remaining 5% would go to the Montana Department of Revenue.

In June, the total amount of sales of adult-use and medical marijuana in Valley County was $137,624.

Tornado in Glentana Confirmed By National Weather Service

Wednesday, July 20th 2022

Here are the results of our storm survey conducted Tuesday, confirming an EF-2 tornado Monday in Glentana, MT.

Valley View Nursing Home In Lock Down Due To COVID Outbreak

Wednesday, July 20th 2022

Valley View Nursing Home is currently experiencing an increase in COVID-19 cases. Valley View is now locking their doors and strongly discouraging any visitors to the facility.

If you must visit the facility, please call 228-2461.

Verizon-Cellular Plus In Glasgow Giving Away Free Backpacks With School Supplies On Saturday, July 30th

Wednesday, July 20th 2022

Verizon-Cellular Plus in Glasgow will be giving away free backpacks filled with school supplies on Saturday, July 30 from 10 am to noon.

“We are honored to give back to our local community by helping students kick off the school year with a brand-new backpack,” stated President, Adam Kimmet. “We want to ease some of the stress that can be placed on families while trying to get the school supplies they need. It’s really rewarding to see the kids parade out of the store, excited to show off their new backpack and ready to start the school year prepared and confident.”

The Verizon-Cellular Plus Backpack to School program incorporates employees, customers, and vendor partners. An internal employee donation program was organized while stores are also accepting donations from their guests in order to help as many families as possible. Donations stay local so each backpack that is donated at a specific location will be distributed to children in that same area.

No purchase is necessary to receive a backpack, but a child must be present with an adult to claim their free backpack. There are a limited number available and will be distributed while supplies last.

Cellular Plus is located at 54147 US-2, next to the Glasgow Chamber of Commerce.

Cellular Plus is a Verizon authorized retailer, founded in 1998, and headquartered in Billings, MT.

Valley County Commissioners Consider Putting Marijuana Excise Tax On November Ballot

Tuesday, July 19th 2022

The Valley County Commissioners will consider a 3% excise tax on the sales of medical marijuana and adult use marijuana at a meeting on Wednesday.

If the commissioners approve Resolution No. 19-2022, the voters of Valley County will make the final decision on whether or not to tax the sales of marijuana in Valley County.

If approved by the commissioners and voters, the 3% tax would go into effect 90 days after being approved by voters. The vote would take place on November 8th.

50% of the revenue from the tax would go to Valley County, 45% would be apportioned to municipalities in Valley County on the basis of the ratio of the population of the city or town to the total county population. The remaining 5% would go to the Montana Department of Revenue.

In June, the total amount of sales of adult-use and medical marijuana in Valley County was $137,624.

Glasgow City Council Meeting From July 18th

Tuesday, July 19th 2022

The Glasgow City Council met in regular session on July 18th. Items passed by the City Council:

The council approved first reading of resolutions that would increase city water and sewer base rates by 2% starting in October. The council also approved first reading of a resolution that would increase the cost of bulk water in the city.

The council approved a collective bargaining agreement between the city and the Glasgow Police Department for fiscal year 2022-2023.

The council approved a resolution determining the salaries and compensation of elected and appointed city officers and all city employees for fiscal year 2022-2023.

Old, Unstable Mining Explosives Found In Phillips County Cause Closure Of County Road

Monday, July 18th 2022

Press release from Phillips County:

Glasgow City Council To Meet Monday At 4:30pm

Monday, July 18th 2022

Mule deer shot and left near Kerr Road south of Opheim, wardens seeking information

Friday, July 15th 2022

Opheim– Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 game wardens are seeking any information regarding a mule deer buck that was shot and left to waste about 15 miles southwest of Opheim, on the junction of Kerr Road and Golden Valley Road in Valley County.

On July 12, the Glasgow FWP office received a call concerning a dead deer observed near the road. After investigating the deer and the crime scene, Warden Sergeant Todd Tryan determined that the deer was shot with a small caliber firearm in the neck, likely over the weekend, and left to waste.

Anyone with possible information about this is encouraged to visit https://myfwp.mt.gov/fwpPub/tipmont to provide details, call the FWP violation reporting hot line at 1-800-TIP-MONT, or call Warden Sergeant Tryan directly at 406-557-7166. Folks with information may be eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000.

Senator Daines And Tester Pushing For Federal Money For The St. Mary's Project

Thursday, July 14th 2022

U.S. Senators Jon Tester and Steve Daines Wednesday urged the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources (ENR) to hold a hearing on their St. Mary's Reinvestment Act, which will provide critical resources to North Central Montana and make rehabilitating the St. Mary's Diversion Dam more affordable.

In a letter to ENR Chair Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Ranking Member John Barrasso (R-Wyo.), Tester and Daines said the project is critical to ensuring the Milk River Project can continue providing water to farmers, ranchers, and Tribes in Northcentral Montana that depend on it.

“St. Mary’s Diversion Dam is the keystone of the Milk River Project, which provides water for over 121,000 irrigated acres, and provides water for four municipalities, two rural water systems, and the Fort Belknap Indian Community,” wrote Tester and Daines. “…Our bill builds on the $100 million for rehabilitation in the bipartisan infrastructure package to provide targeted funding for rehabilitating the St. Mary’s Diversion Dam, the highest priority piece of the Milk River Project for rehabilitation. Past rehabilitation efforts have stalled due to the current 74 percent nonfederal costshare for rehabilitation work on the Milk River Project. In response, our legislation sets the costshare for water users on an ability-to-pay study conducted by Bureau of Reclamation, setting the price tag for the remaining rehabilitation needs on what water users can actually afford.”

The St. Mary's Reinvestment Act will authorize $52 million to rehabilitate the St. Mary's Diversion Dam, part of Bureau of Reclamation's (BoR) Milk River Project in Northcentral Montana, and require the BoR to use an ability-to-pay study on what the current water users could afford to pay for the project and set the cost share for the rehabilitation based on that study.

Currently, water users on the Milk River Project cover 74 percent of operations and maintenance costs, but that funding structure is unsustainable for the hundreds of millions of dollars in needed rehabilitation across the project.

“Advancing this legislation, which has been a bipartisan priority for Montana’s delegation for years, will provide critical support to rehabilitating water infrastructure that is integral to supporting agricultural producers, Tribal water rights, meeting international commitments, and mitigating the impacts of the ongoing drought in north central Montana,” the Senators concluded.

The Milk River Project provides water to 18,000 Montanans and irrigates enough cropland to feed one million people.

Hinsdale School District Voters Pass Building Reserve Levies For New Boiler And HVAC Systems

Wednesday, July 13th 2022

The Hinsdale School District held a special election on Tuesday to determine if the school district would purchase a new boiler and hvac system for the high school district and elementary district.

Both the high school levy and elementary levy passed.

The high school building reserve levy passed 106-45. 38% voter turnout.

The elementary building reserve levy passed 108-37. 40% voter turnout.

The Hinsdale Building Reserve Fund for the high school was $805,975. Elementary Building Reserve Fund was for $332,561.

Recent deer surveys in northeast Montana indicate lower overall numbers compared to the last few years

Tuesday, July 12th 2022

GLASGOW – Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks biologists completed 2022 post-season winter and spring aerial surveys of deer populations across Region 6 in northeastern Montana. The surveys indicate variable numbers for mule deer across the region and below average populations of white-tailed deer.

Mule Deer
“A significant drought in 2021 had impacts on the mule deer numbers across the region, most notably in the central and western portion of the region,” said Ryan Williamson, Outlook-area biologist.
“The 2021 drought likely led to lower fawn survival and recruitment, as indicated by the lower fawn ratios we saw during the surveys,” added Williamson.

In the south-central portion of the region, including hunting districts (HDs) 620s and 630, numbers were below average, with other districts north of Highway 2, such as 670 and 600, remaining above average, and HD 690 remained near average. Due to population decreases in HDs 620, 630, 670 and 690 compared to the last few years, B-license quotas were reduced prior to the June 1 drawing.
In contrast, hunting districts 640 and 650 in the eastern portion of the region are still well above average and higher numbers of antlerless B-licenses were maintained.

“We appreciate hunters doing their part to help manage the record high mule deer numbers the last few years, “added Williamson. “We are now starting to see mule deer numbers closer to average across the region.”

White-tailed deer
The 2022 winter surveys for white-tailed deer show a density of 7.3 deer per square mile across the trend areas. This is below the long-term average of 10.6 deer per square mile, and the lowest density seen since 2016.

The 2021 drought impacted whitetail habitats and distribution as well, but another significant factor was an outbreak of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD), mainly on the eastern portion of the region along the Missouri River.

“The largest EHD impacts were in areas closer to the North Dakota border,” said Williamson, “and winter surveys indicated reductions of over 50% along the Missouri River and Sandhills areas but was noticeably patchy with some areas still maintaining average numbers.”

Scattered pockets of EHD were also observed on the Milk River between Glasgow and Malta and out on the prairie habitats in northeastern pockets of the region, including in the Dagmar and Froid areas.
Obtaining antlerless B-licenses

Beyond the general deer license (also known as the “A” tag), which is valid for either-sex deer or either species, many options are available to obtain additional antlerless deer licenses (also known as “B” tags). Hunters may hold a total of seven deer B licenses. Besides the June 1 drawing for antlerless mule deer-B licenses, several other options are still available:
Surplus license list
The surplus license list sign-up is open June 20-July 20. Hunters must go to their myFWP account on the FWP website to sign up for the surplus list. If drawn, hunters must then finalize the purchase of the license/permit within the timeframe specified in an email from FWP, otherwise, the opportunity will be offered to the next hunter on the randomized list.
Over-the-counter white-tailed deer B-licenses
Hunters can purchase the 006-00 single-region antlerless white-tailed deer B-license (up to four per hunter) over the counter starting Aug. 8. This license is valid all HDs in Region 6.
Surplus over-the-counter licenses
Hunters may be able to purchase over-the-counter antlerless mule deer-B surplus licenses (that are left over after the surplus license list is complete), starting Aug. 8.
For any questions on license opportunity, please refer to the 2022 deer, elk, and antelope regulations or call your local FWP office:
Glasgow office: 406-228-3700 (open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. M-F)
Havre field office: 406-265-6177 (open 10 a.m.-2 p.m. M-F)


$25,000 donation to VALCO Pool splashes fundraising efforts over $2.5 million

Tuesday, July 12th 2022

With fundraising efforts for the new pool getting close to the end, Katie Knierim, husband Kevin Miller and children Jack and Molly Miller wanted to make their splash and in doing so, pushed efforts to over $2.5 million! They want to encourage everyone to give what they can so that our community can finally get this new pool built!

Katie swam in swim team growing up and now, she gets to watch both Jack and Molly participant in swim team currently! She estimates that she’s used the pool for four decades and her kids have used it almost a decade when you include both swim lessons and swim team years. While her husband Kevin didn’t grow up in Glasgow, he has become a great swim team dad. “Swim team is a great group of kids, and we love watching the older kids model hard work, discipline, and kindness for the younger kids. Our kids do lots of youth sports, but our local swim team does the best job of creating team chemistry. From youngest to oldest, the whole team, parents and grandparents all turn out to cheer on each and every kid.”

When asked how the Valley County pool has had a positive impact on their family’s life, Katie responded with, “We love swim team and our summer sports family. The weekends swimming, camping, and playing Nerf wars with teammates happily define our summers.”

Currently, the pool is in terrible shape and quite literally, falling apart. Jory Casterline was recently on Live Under the Big Sky and talked about the immense undertaking it is each year to get the pool ready for another season. “While the community has done an amazing job raising money for the new pool, we decided as a family, we wanted to be a part of that and know that we did what we could to help!” Katie stated.

If you’d like to know more about the VALCO Pool Campaign, you can visit their website at www.valcopool.com or follow them on social media @valcopool. If you have any questions, please contact a Committee Member or call (406) 228-2476 ext. 2.

Yard Of The Week

Monday, July 11th 2022

The Yard of the Week as selected by the City of Glasgow:

Jan and Mike Kaiser at 640 5th Avenue South.

Gasoline Prices Down 12 Cents In last Week

Monday, July 11th 2022

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Pump prices declined again, falling another 12 cents since last week to $4.67. The dip in the national average for a gallon of gas occurred despite a slight rise in demand, likely due to robust July 4th holiday automobile travel. AAA forecasted that 42 million people would hit the roads for the holiday weekend, a new record.

“Usually, more people buying gas would lead to higher pump prices,” said Andrew Gross, AAA spokesperson. “But the price for oil, the main ingredient in gasoline, has fallen and is hovering around $100 a barrel. Less expensive oil usually means less expensive gas.”

According to new data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), gas demand increased from 8.92 million b/d to 9.41 million b/d ahead of the 4th of July holiday, while total domestic gas stocks decreased by 2.5 million bbl. Typically, these supply/demand trends would put upward pressure on pump prices; however, falling oil prices have contributed to lower pump prices.

Today’s national average of $4.67 is 32 cents less than a month ago and $1.53 more than a year ago.

The average price for gasoline in Montana is $4.88 per gallon and in Valley County its $4.93 per gallon.

Valley County Transit To Reduce Hours Effective July 17th

Monday, July 11th 2022

Due to circumstances beyond our control, Valley County Transit hours of service are being reduced effective July 17th. Service will still be available Monday through Friday from 7:15 am until 5:00 pm within Glasgow.

After hours service within Glasgow will now be:
Sunday from 7:30 am to 5:00 pm
No Monday and Tuesday evening service after 5:00 pm
Wednesday, Thursday & Friday from 5:00 pm until 11:00 pm
Saturday from 7:30 am until 11:00 pm

Service to Nashua and Fort Peck remains the same (MUST schedule in advance):
Monday through Friday - leave Glasgow at 7:15 am and 4:15 pm

Service to St. Marie will be as follows (MUST call in ½ hour prior to departure from Glasgow):
Sunday - leave Glasgow at 12:00 noon and 5:00 pm
Monday & Tuesday - leave Glasgow at 11:30 am and 5:15 pm, no later evening service
Wednesday, Thursday & Friday - leave Glasgow at 11:30 am, 5:15 pm and 8:00 pm
Saturday - leave Glasgow at 12:00 noon and 5:00 pm

We hope this will only be temporary until we can hire more drivers.

Feel free to call Colleen Pankratz with any questions at 406-228-8744 and thank you for the tremendous support we have received for nearly 50 years!

Marijuana Sales Spike In Montana And Valley County

Thursday, July 7th 2022

Marijuana sales in Montana went up in June, reaching a monthly total of $24,897,330.

The Department of Revenue reported recreational marijuana sales amounted to $17,268,597, which is up from $16,629,200 in May.

So far this year, combined recreational and medical marijuana sales have totaled almost $150 million. That adds up to nearly $21 million in state taxes.

Total sales for June in Valley County included $91,734 in adult-use sales and $45,890 in medical sales for a grand total of $137,624.

This compares to the month of May when adult-use sales totaled $66,512 and medical sales totaled $34,061 for a monthly amount of $100,573.

In the month of June, Roosevelt County had $298,035 in sales and Sheridan County had $70,368 in total sales. Phillips County and Daniels County voted in 2020 to not allow the sales of marijuana in their counties.

Water Levels Projected To Continue Decreasing On Fort Peck Reservoir

Wednesday, July 6th 2022

Despite improved runoff in June, water conservation measures will continue for the second half of the navigation flow support season based on the July 1 Missouri River Mainstem Reservoir System storage.

June runoff in the Missouri River basin above Sioux City, Iowa was 5.2 million acre-feet, 94%of average. The updated 2022 runoff forecast is 20.0 MAF, 78% of average and 1.7 MAF higher than last month’s annual runoff forecast. June runoff into Garrison was 110%of average.

“Heavy rain in mid-June on the upper Yellowstone River, coincided with mountain snowmelt increasing inflows into Garrison reservoir,” said John Remus, chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Missouri River Basin Water Management Division.

The only other reach above average was Gavins Point to Sioux City, which was 136% of average.
“While soil moisture has improved in some areas over the last month, drought conditions persist across much of the Missouri River basin, and mainstem reservoir levels remain below normal,” said Remus.

“Based on the July 1 System storage the navigation flow support service level will be increased slightly, and, per the guidelines in the Master Manual, the navigation flow support season will be 3 days shorter.”

Mountain Snowpack:
Mountain snowpack in the upper Missouri River Basin has melted. The mountain snowpack peaked above Fort Peck on April 29 at 85% of average, while the mountain snowpack in the Fort Peck to Garrison reach peaked on May 3 at 92% of average. Mountain snowpack normally peaks near April 17.

“Now that the snow has melted, we expect to see System storage decline as we make releases during the drier summer and fall periods to meet the authorized purposes,” said Remus.


Reservoir Forecast:

Fort Peck Dam
Average releases past month – 8,200 cfs
Current release rate – 8,000 cfs
Forecast average release rate – 8,000 cfs
End-of-June reservoir level – 2222.2 feet (up 0.1 feet from May 31)
Forecast end-of-July reservoir level – 2221.6 feet
Notes: Releases will be maintained at 8,000 cfs through August.The forecast reservoir releases and elevations discussed above are not definitive. Additional precipitation, lack of precipitation or other circumstances could cause adjustments to the reservoir release rates.

Hydropower:
The six mainstem power plants generated 595 million kWh of electricity in June. Typical energy generation for June is 850 million kWh. The power plants are expected to generate 7.2 billion kWh this year, compared to the long-term average of 9.4 billion kWh.

Tester And Daines Block VA facility Recommendations, Including Proposed Montana Clinic Closures

Wednesday, July 6th 2022

Story Credi:
https://missoulacurrent.com/government/2022/07/montana-clinic-closures/

A U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs report laid out sweeping proposals earlier this year for changes to VA health care facilities – including closing some clinics in Montana. Now, though, it appears those recommendations aren’t going anywhere, due to opposition in Congress.

Twelve U.S. senators, including Montana’s Jon Tester and Steve Daines, released a statement last week, vowing not to approve any members to the Asset and Infrastructure Review, or AIR, Commission, that was set to consider the recommendations – essentially stopping the process from moving forward.

“As Senators, we share a commitment to expanding and strengthening modern VA infrastructure in a way that upholds our obligations to America’s veterans,” the statement said. “We believe the recommendations put forth to the AIR Commission are not reflective of that goal, and would put veterans in both rural and urban areas at a disadvantage, which is why we are announcing that this process does not have our support and will not move forward. The Commission is not necessary for our continued push to invest in VA health infrastructure, and together we remain dedicated to providing the Department with the resources and tools it needs to continue delivering quality care and earned services to veterans in 21st-century facilities—now and into the future.”

The review process began as part of the VA MISSION Act, which passed with bipartisan support in 2018. In March, the Department released its Asset and Infrastructure Review report, with recommendations for how the VA system could be updated to keep it ready to serve veterans in the future.

In Montana, the report recommended closing four VA locations: rural clinics in Browning, Glasgow and Plentywood, as well as the Miles City Community Living Center, a nursing home. Veterans and advocacy groups raised concerns about the proposals, and Montana VA leaders stressed that they were only recommendations.

Tester, who chairs the U.S. Senate’s Veterans’ Affairs Committee, said the recommendations were different than what he was hoping to see out of the process.

“We’ve heard from veterans from all over the country and veterans service organizations that have told us time and time again that this is a flawed process,” he said.

Daines and Tester both said the proposals – for Montana and the rest of the country – were outdated, based on questionable data and especially bad for rural veterans.

The AIR Commission was set to begin reviewing the proposals this year, then make its own recommendations to President Joe Biden. Biden named his nominees to the commission, but they also need the approval of the Senate. If the Senate doesn’t confirm anyone, the process – and the recommendations – can’t move forward.

“The AIR Commission as it stands today would make VA infrastructure decisions on old, faulty data that would disadvantage Montanans and rural veterans around the country,” Daines said in a statement. “We must ensure any such Commission honors the commitment to provide quality care to our Montana veterans, and until then, I cannot and will not support it. I’m committed to ensuring veterans in every corner of our state have access to the care and services they need.”

Tester said it is important to make sure the VA’s facilities are aligned with its mission and the needs of the people it serves.

“The review needs to happen all the time, every day,” he said. “What Congress needs to do is give the VA the tools and the appropriations needed to be able to fix problems when they arise and not have to go through a bunch of red tape.”

He said the Montana VA has shown how that can be done – asking for and successfully launching new clinics in areas where they’re needed. Eight new facilities have opened in the state over the last three years.

In the end, Tester said Congress needs to take the responsibility for veterans’ facilities on themselves.

“The facilities are out there,” he said. “If the facilities aren’t up to snuff, then Congress needs to sit down and say, ‘Hey, look, if we’re gonna send folks off to war, we’ve gotta take care of them when they get home, and if we’re not willing to take care of them when they get home, then we shouldn’t be sending them off to war.’ And that’s what I would tell the veterans out there: we’re listening to you, and we’re reacting to what you’re saying.”

Tester said the PACT Act, a bill expanding coverage for veterans who were exposed to burn pits and other toxic substances, also includes provisions to assist the VA with infrastructure. In addition, he’s currently working on another bill to support those projects.

Popular Theatre for a Young Audience Tour returns with
THE COUNTRY MOUSE AND THE CITY MOUSE

Wednesday, July 6th 2022

Ernie and Ernest have been best friends for as long as they can remember. As pen pals they eagerly exchange letters almost every day, which travel nearly 5,000 miles between their homes in Montana and London. Though their daily routines are very different at times, they share what is most important: love of family & home and the value of having fun, as they learn about culture, sports, history and food (mainly cheese of course!).

The Country Mouse and the City Mouse is written by Fort Peck Summer Theatre Artistic Director Andy Meyers and produced in partnership with emerging company AM Theatrical. Original Music for the production is composed & arranged by Jane Best.

The production is directed by Boston based artist Shelby Mariah Art, who previously toured internationally as an Actor/Director with Missoula Childrens Theatre. Musical direction is by Alicia Bullock-Muth. It features 4 professional actors: Saco native Chayten Pippin, Winnett native Shy Iverson, Benjamin Wambeke and Taylor Noll, with designs by Jay Michael Roberts (scenic and props), Allison Hinkle (costumes), and Jesse Worley (sound).

Theatre for Young Audience (TYA) is designed to educate and enlighten youth, with a goal to bring visibility, excitement and awareness about the performing arts. Under an hour in length, TYA productions are perfect for the entire family: geared towards children, but sure to engage all ages while it encourages and fosters a love for theatre. Admission for these performances is FREE.

The Country Mouse and the City Mouse tour schedule is as follows. Please continue to check the exact locations of these performance, as some will be moving to outside spaces to accommodate social-distancing protocols and weather:

Tuesday, July 12 @ 10:00am: Glasgow City-County Library
Wednesday, July 13 @ 2:00pm: Philips County Museum, Malta
Thursday, July 14 @ 11:00am: Sheridan Library, Plentywood
Thursday, July 14 @ 2:30pm: The Rex Theatre, Scobey
Saturday, July 16 @ 10:00am: Fort Peck Interp Center
Monday, July 18 @ 2:00pm: The Winnett School Gymnasium

Patsy Cline Musical To Debut At Fort Peck Summer Theatre

Tuesday, July 5th 2022

Back by popular demand, Always…Patsy Cline will make a return to Fort Peck Summer Theatre, completing the 2022 line up. A runaway hit from Fort Peck Summer Theatre’s 2015 season, the musical will perform for two weekends only, July 15 – July 24. Based on a true story about Patsy’s friendship with a fan from Houston named Louise Seger, the musical is full of down-home country humor, true emotion and even some audience participation. It includes over 2 dozen of Patsy’s greatest hits, including ‘Crazy’, ‘I Fall to Pieces’ and ‘Walking After Midnight’.

Reprising their iconic roles from the hit 2015 production, Glasgow native Debra Berger will star as Patsy Cline, with audience favorite Pam L. Veis as Louise. Luree Green-Chappell leads the onstage band, which also features Bergen Miller, Jon Svingen and the Saco Pippins: Chris, Chayten and Carter!

Heather Adams returns as director, recreating her extraordinary vision from the 2015 production.

Our rotating schedule continues: Remaining dates include: Forever Plaid concludes July 2. The Complete History of America (Abridged) runs July 2, 3, and 9 and Bridges of Madison County July 1, 9 and 10 . Performances are Fridays & Saturdays at 7:30pm, selected Saturday, 2 pm matinees and Sundays at 4:00pm. For tickets go to www.fortpecktheatre.org or call 406-228-9216. Theatre Box office opens May 26, 1-5 pm, Thursdays-Sundays, 406-526-9943.

Following Always…Patsy Cline, the 2022 Season continues with:
Seussical: July 29 – August 14
Wait Until Dark: August 19 – September 4

Archery-Only Paddlefish Season Underway In Fort Peck Dredge Cuts

Tuesday, July 5th 2022

July 1 marks the beginning of the archery-only paddlefish season in the Fort Peck Dredge Cuts below Fort Peck Dam. Archery anglers need to purchase a 2022 blue paddlefish harvest tag to target paddlefish in the Dredge Cuts. As in previous years, harvested paddlefish are required to be reported within 48 hours.

Anglers can self-report their harvested paddlefish and submit a dentary (jaw) sample at three self-creeling locations near the Dredge Cuts: Floodplain (Winter Harbor), Nelson Dredge, and Roundhouse Point boat ramps. Anglers can also report online at myfwp.mt.gov/, or by calling the phone hotline (1-877-FWP-WILD or 406-444-0356).

Anglers reporting harvested paddlefish that provide all necessary information: angler tag number, jaw tag number (if present), length (eye-tail fork), sex, date of harvest, and also voluntarily submit a dentary (jaw) sample will receive a unique 2022 Montana paddlefish hat. These data allow biologists and managers to understand age structure of the population and ensure sustainable management of paddlefish in the future.

Anglers failing to report a harvested paddlefish within 48 hours will be ineligible to purchase a paddlefish tag in 2023.

Questions regarding the Dredge Cut paddlefish season or reporting paddlefish harvested in the Dredge Cuts can be directed to biologist Jared Krebs at 406-808-7068 or jared.krebs@mt.gov .

COVID Update From Valley County Health Department

Friday, July 1st 2022

COVID update:

Since the last update on 6/23/22, Valley County has had 20 new cases. We currently have 28 cases of active infection.

More COVID tests should arrive at VCHD on July 5. 5th Avenue Pharmacy has free tests for the public.
If you think you have allergies, it is likely to be COVID infection. Please test yourself and stay home to limit contact with others.

Seek medical care if needed - stay healthy, Valley County!

Canadian Resident Facing Federal Charges After Allegedly Starting Fire Near Zortman In 2017

Friday, July 1st 2022

A Canadian resident is facing a federal charge after allegedly causing an 11,000-acre, $5.5 million wildfire in Montana.

The United States Attorney's Office filed a case Monday in U.S. District Court in Great Falls against Darrel Lynn Swanson for one misdemeanor count of leaving a fire unattended or unextinguished.

Authorities allege Swanson shot off fireworks on Bureau of Land Management lands in the Alder Creek drainage, near Zortman, Montana on July 3, 2017.

Investigating authorities allegedly found evidence of bottle rockets in what was determined to be Swanson's campsite.

Witnesses told investigators that they warned Swanson not to fire off fireworks. Swanson allegedly told investigators that he tried to suppress the fire, but freaked out and left without reporting the incident.

Swanson is set to appear in federal court in Great Falls on July 14.

Increased Law Enforcement Patrols Over 4th Of July Weekend

Friday, July 1st 2022

As the Fourth of July weekend approaches, Valley County Sheriff’s Office, Glasgow Police Department, and the Montana Highway Patrol (MHP) are encouraging Montanans to plan for a sober ride home before they celebrate. The Fourth is one of the deadliest holidays in Montana, so local law enforcement will be increasing patrols in Valley County and City of Glasgow, making DUI arrests to ensure every Montanan gets home safely. Valley County Sheriff’s Office, Glasgow Police Department, MHP and the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) are committed to reducing fatalities and serious injuries on Montana’s roadways during busy holiday weekends.

According to MDT, if drivers have a BAC (blood alcohol content) of .08 or higher, they could receive a DUI charge and other serious consequences, including having their driver’s license revoked, being required to take mandatory classes, and receiving possible jail time and up to $10,000 in fines and legal fees.

“If you’re drinking this holiday weekend, be sure to make a plan for a safe ride home” said Undersheriff Chris Richter with the Valley County Sheriff’s Office. “The important thing to know is how you’re getting home even before you go out. There are lots of ways to plan for a sober ride. Designate one of your friends as a sober driver, arrange for a rideshare service/cab/public transportation, or call a friend or family member. If you see your friends have had too much to drink, have their back and help them get home safely too.”

Why is Law Enforcement on high alert during the holiday weekend? These are Montana’s sobering statistics:
The state has the highest share of alcohol-related traffic deaths at 45% (2020)
66% (2020) of all fatalities are the result of impaired driving (up from 58% during 2019)
1227 people were killed in crashes involving an alcohol-impaired driver from 2011–2020

“By making a plan before you go out, you’ll help keep our roads safer for everyone and protect our great state,” said MHP Colonel Steve Lavin. “Make sure you celebrate responsibly as you gather with friends and family on the Fourth. Together we can keep our community safe.”

2022-2023 Glasgow School Calendar

Wednesday, June 29th 2022

Gas Prices Continue To Drop Across The Nation According To AAA

Tuesday, June 28th 2022

A drop in the global price of oil helped the national average for a gallon of gas to fall for a second week to land at $4.89. Economic fears of a potential global recession leading to less demand for oil dropped the price to around $107 per barrel, down from $110 last week.

“Fear is not a good reason to move a market like the one for oil, but it is a powerful motivator,” said Andrew Gross, AAA spokesperson. “The cost of oil accounts for nearly $3 for every $4.89 at the gas pump. Consumers should find more relief when fueling up if oil prices drop further.”

Please note that a vital gas price indicator was unavailable to AAA for this week’s report. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) said it was delaying the release of gasoline demand data because of “systems issues.” Demand is a sign of whether motorists are fueling up or not, which in turn may be reflected in higher or lower pump prices.

At the close of Friday’s formal trading session, WTI increased by $3.35 to settle at $107.62. Although crude prices strengthened at the end of the week due to positive market sentiment after the stock market rallied, crude prices dropped earlier in the week amid broad market concern regarding the potential for economic growth to slow or stall due to rising interest rates and inflation. A lower economic growth rate than expected could cause crude demand to decline, leading prices to follow suit. For this week, crude prices could decline if EIA’s reporting shows a large increase in total domestic stocks.

Today’s national average of $4.88 is ten cents less than a week ago, 29 cents more than a month ago, and $1.79 more than a year ago.

Today's average in Montana is $4.95 per gallon which is down two cents from last week. The average price in Valley County is $4.93 per gallon according to AAA.

Valley County To Receive $1.186 Million In PILT Funding From Federal Government

Tuesday, June 28th 2022

The Department of the Interior has announced more than 1,900 state and local governments around the country will receive a total of $549.4 million in Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) funding for 2022. Because local governments cannot tax federal lands, annual PILT payments help to defray the costs associated with maintaining important community services.

PILT payments are made for tax-exempt federal lands administered by the Department’s agencies – including the Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and National Park Service. In addition, PILT payments cover federal lands administered by the U.S. Forest Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission. Payments are calculated based on the number of acres of federal land within each county or jurisdiction and the population of that county or jurisdiction.

“This program is an important example of the federal government’s commitment to continuing to be a good neighbor to the communities we serve. The nearly $550 million being distributed will help local governments carry out vital services, such as firefighting and police protection, construction of public schools and roads, and search-and-rescue operations,” said Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland.

Since PILT payments began in 1977, the Department has distributed nearly $10.8 billion to states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

The Department collects more than $12.1 billion in revenue annually from commercial activities on public lands. A portion of those revenues is shared with states and counties. The balance is deposited into the U.S. Treasury, which in turn pays for a broad array of federal activities, including PILT funding.

Valley County will receive $1.186 million in PILT Funding for 2022 compared to $1.153 million in 2021.

Individual payments may vary from year to year as a result of changes in acreage data, which is updated annually by the federal agency administering the land; prior year federal revenue-sharing payments reported annually by the Governor of each state; inflationary adjustments using the Consumer Price Index; and population data, which are updated using information from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Fireworks Allowed In City Limits Of Glasgow July 3rd Through July 5th

Tuesday, June 28th 2022

Glasgow City Ordinance Allows fireworks to be discharged within the city limits July 3rd-5th.

Only permissible fireworks are allowed to be fired, set off, exploded, or discharged within the city limits, but aerial projectiles may not have the ability to exceed 10 feet in the air.

Fireworks may be discharged within the time frame of 12:30pm and 12:30am each day.

Any person who participates in the discharge of fireworks shall be responsible for any garbage, fire and or projectiles associated with the fireworks.

Fireworks In Valley County

Monday, June 27th 2022

Release from the Valley County Sheriff's Office and Long Run Fire Department:

Sunday the Long Run Fire Department has responded to two fires ignited by fireworks. Those lighting the fireworks did not remain on scene and did not work to extinguish or notify dispatch.
Currently, there are no county restrictions on fires or fireworks.
However, this does not preclude people from being responsible and diligent in preventing costly, time consuming and dangerous fires.

MCA: 50-63-103 states ... Liability of offender for damages and costs
A person who sets or leaves a fire that spreads and damages or destroys property of any kind not belonging to the person is liable for all damages caused by the fire, and an owner of property damaged or destroyed by the fire may maintain a civil suit for the purpose of recovering damages. A person who sets or leaves a fire that threatens to spread and damage or destroy property is liable for all costs and expenses incurred, including but no limited to expenses incurred in investigation of the fire and administration of fire suppression, by the State of Montana, by any forestry association, or by any person extinguishing or preventing the spread of the fire.

So where can fireworks be set off?
Private property.
Locations that do not prohibit fireworks and such could be gravel pits or areas with no grass, wood, weeds, crops.
Please be prepared to extinguish all sources of flame and diligently ensure there are no fires left behind.

Valley County Sheriff's Office in cooperation with Long Run Fire Department and Valley County DES

Valley County COVID Update

Friday, June 24th 2022

COVID update from Valley County Health Department:

Since our last update on 6/1/22 at 5:30 pm, Valley County has had:

39 new COVID cases reported (11 of these people attended reunion activities)

1 death from COVID complications

Currently we have 20 active COVID cases.

Free take-home COVID tests are available at the front door of Valley County Health Department.

If you have tested positive for Covid at home, please contact VCHD for help to determine your infectious period, how to protect those around you, or if you have any other questions. Seek medical care if needed!

Stay home if you are sick or have any COVID symptoms. PLEASE do not go in public places or seek a COVID vaccine while you are infectious.

Stay healthy, Valley County!

USS Montana Submarine To Be Commissioned On Saturday In Virginia

Friday, June 24th 2022

The newest Virginia-class attack submarine, the future USS Montana (SSN 794), will be commissioned at Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, Saturday, June 25 at 10:00 a.m. It will be the third of the Block IV Virginia-class attack submarines to be delivered.

Gov. Greg Gianforte of Montana will deliver the principal address. The ceremony will be live-streamed at: https://www.dvidshub.net/webcast/28926. The link will become active at 9:45 a.m. EST on June 25.

The submarine's sponsor is Sally Jewell, former Secretary of the United States Department of Interior. Montana was christened at Newport News Shipbuilding, a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries, in Newport News, Virginia, on Sept. 12, 2020. Mrs. Jewell will give the order to "man our ship and bring her to life."

The future USS Montana (SSN 794) honors the Treasure State. This will be the second commissioned warship bearing the name. The first USS Montana (ACR-13), an armored cruiser, was also built at Newport News Shipbuilding and commissioned July 1908. ACR-13 served in the Atlantic and Mediterranean, landed Marines during unrest in Haiti in 1914 and escorted convoys during World War I. The first USS Montana was decommissioned in 1921, and two other vessels named after the state never saw commissioned service. BB 51, under construction at the time, was scrapped according to the Washington Treaty limiting naval armaments, and BB 67 construction was cancelled before the keel was laid down.

As the most modern and sophisticated attack submarine in the world, the submarine can operate in both littoral and deep ocean environments and presents combatant commanders with a broad and unique range of operational capabilities. Montana is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare, antisurface warfare, delivery of special operations forces, strike warfare, irregular warfare, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and mine warfare.

Hinsdale School Asking Voters To Approve New Boiler And Ventilation System

Friday, June 24th 2022

Hinsdale School Voters are being asked to approve two levies dealing with the school boiler and ventilation system.

According to the Hinsdale School, the present boiler and ventilation system is becoming obsolete. The current boiler was installed in 1968.

The election is set for July 12, 2022 and ballots need to returned by that day.

The Hinsdale Building Reserve Fund for the high school is $805,975. Elementary Building Reserve Fund is for $332,561.

Wolf Point Man Sentenced To Prison After Admitting To Fatally Shooting Another Man In The Back

Wednesday, June 22nd 2022

A Wolf Point man who admitted to fatally shooting another man in the back on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation was sentenced today to 16 years in prison, to be followed by five years of supervised release, U.S. Attorney Jesse Laslovich said.

Doratello “DJ” Juan Fischer, 37, pleaded guilty in November 2021 to second degree murder as charged in an information.

Chief U.S. District Judge Brian M. Morris presided.

The government alleged in court documents that on Nov. 27, 2020, Fischer shot the victim in the back with a .22-caliber rifle, killing him. Fischer had been driving around Wolf Point drinking alcohol with his girlfriend and other person that evening. While driving down an alley, Fischer told his girlfriend to stop the car and he then got out. The victim was standing outside of a residence near the alley. Fischer shot the victim in the back with a .22-caliber rifle, back, got back into the vehicle with his girlfriend and sped away. The rifle was never found.

The victim was transported to Trinity Hospital in Wolf Point where he was pronounced dead. The cause of death was a single gunshot wound to the back.

The shooting occurred following a Nov. 24, 2020 incident at a Wolf Point bar where law enforcement responded to the victim brandishing a firearm and pointing it at Fischer. The day before Fischer shot the victim, Fischer used social media to communicate with another individual about the victim pointing the gun at him. Fischer said that he was planning on “coming to town to go hunting.”

Assistant U.S. Attorneys Lori Harper Suek and Jared C. Cobell prosecuted the case, which was investigated by the FBI, Fort Peck Tribes Criminal Investigation and Wolf Point Police Department.

Glasgow City Council Meets Monday

Tuesday, June 21st 2022

The Glasgow City Council Met on Monday and here the notes from the decisions made at the meeting:

The council awarded the city's gas and diesel for fiscal year 2022-2023. Total cost for the package was $75,373. This is an increase of approximately $16,000 from the previous year.

Approved a request to advertise for qualifications for city attorney services. Current City Attorney Anna Rose Sullivan will be leaving the job later this year.

Approved the hiring of Ashley Beyers for a position as contracted grant writer for the City of Glasgow.

Valley County Unemployment Rate 2.3% In May

Monday, June 20th 2022

Both Montana’s labor force and total employment continued to set historic records in May, with the state’s labor force growing by an estimated 2,168 workers and total employment posting gains of 1,559 workers. Both key indicators are at their highest point in Montana’s history.

“We continue to see more and more workers joining Montana’s labor force, an encouraging sign as Montana businesses seek to fill needed positions,” said Laurie Esau, Montana’s Commissioner of Labor & Industry. “Expanding our supply of workers – and ensuring they’re trained with the skills employers need -- will be key to continuing the strong economic growth Montana has enjoyed over the last year and a half. More Montanans are working than ever before, and its labor force today is the largest ever.”

Montana’s unemployment rate ticked up 0.1% in May to 2.4%, as labor force growth slightly outpaced total employment. Payroll employment declined slightly by 1,900, with declines primarily in the retail trade and construction industries.

The unemployment rate in Valley County was 2.3% in the month of May compared to 2.7% in May of 2021.

Sign-Up Opening For Surplus Drawing Licenses And Permits

Monday, June 20th 2022

Hunters interested in signing up for licenses or permits left over from the special license and permit drawing can do so from June 20th through July 20th. This new process for the sale of surplus licenses began in 2020 in response to issues in years past. The old process was vulnerable to long lag times, confusion and a perception of inequity for those unable to use the first-come, first-served online option starting at 5 AM.

Hunters can sign up for leftover licenses and permits that were not distributed by the drawing through MyFWP on the FWP website. The resulting Surplus License List will be randomized with hunters at the top of the list contacted via email with instructions to finalize their purchase within a specified time.

To be placed on the Surplus License List, resident and nonresident hunters can sign up through the MyFWP portal: https://myfwp.mt.gov/fwpExtPortal/login/login.jsp. This new process requires hunters to keep their email address current in their ALS record. Payment of the license fee is not required to sign up on the Surplus License List. Obtaining a license from this list has no effect on your existing bonus points.

Hunters must finalize the purchase of the license/permit within the timeframe specified in the email, otherwise, your opportunity will be offered to the next hunter on the randomized list. FWP may offer opportunities that have not sold out through the Surplus License List to over-the-counter customers at our internal and external license sale providers.

The timeframes to sign up for the various Surplus lists are as follows:

Deer and Elk Permits, Deer B and Elk B License: June 20 – July 20
Antelope, Antelope B, Crane, Special Mountain Lion: Aug. 9 – Aug. 23
Nonresidents who hold a NR Native License, Youth Combo License, or NR College Student Combination License may purchase Deer B and Elk B licenses at half price.

For more information, contact the FWP licensing office at 406-444-2950 or fwplic@mt.gov.

Glasgow City Council To Meet On Monday

Saturday, June 18th 2022

915 GHS Graduates Registered For GHS All-Class Reunion

Friday, June 17th 2022

915 GHS graduates registered and a head count of 1367 for this weekends All-Class Reunion. Here is the schedule for this weekend:

Friday June 17th
During the Day - Open schedule, class gatherings, tours

8:00 AM
Breakfast available for purchase. Valley Country Hope Project: @ The Connection Food Booth at the Fairgrounds

11:00 AM to 1:30 PM
Lunch available for purchase @ Senior Citizens Center: Sloppy Jos & Chips & Fruit, Melons.

4:00 PM
Tour of GHS given by Brenner Flaten. Transportation to GHS NOT provided.

6:00 PM
BBQ Beef dinner. Music @ Event Center 6 PM to 1AM, and @ Beer Gardens 8 PM to 1AM. Adult beverages available for purchase wrist band and drink tickets required. Drink ticket sales STOP at midnight, last call 12:30 AM.

7:00 PM - 2:30 AM
Valley County Sheriff , Search & Rescue, Long Run Fire, Departments will be providing FREE transportation from the Event Center to your place of lodging or home. Buses will leave the Event Center every hour and half hour. Please play it safe don’t drink and drive!

8:00 PM - 1:00 AM
Auzzy Austin food truck original HI-Hat burgers and other food. Food and beverages available for purchase at the Fairgrounds by the Beer Garden.
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Saturday June 18th
During the Day - Open Schedule, class gatherings, tours

7:00 AM
28th Annual Longest Dam Race @ Kiwanis Park @ Fort Peck. Check in 1 hour prior to your race event. Registrations excepted up to 1/2 hour before race time.

7:30 AM to 11:30 AM
Breakfast available for purchase @ St. Raphaels Church Parish Center.

8:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Breakfast available for purchase @ Senior Citizens Center. Casserole with Fruit & Berries.

9:00 AM
Golf Tournament

9:00 AM
Flatland Cruisers Car Show on 2nd Ave. S @ the Elks Club.

12:00 PM - 1:30 AM
Auzzy Austin food truck original HI-Hat burgers and other food. Food and beverages available for purchase Downtown Glasgow.

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Cross Country Reunion @ Steve & Vonnie’s home #10 Riverview Rd. Glasgow MT. RSVP with Mark @ 406-363-8269 or Lisa @ 406-263-0027.

1:00 PM
Tour of GHS given by Brenner Flaten. Transportation to GHS NOT provided.

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Open house @ First Lutheran Church.

3:00 PM
Scottie Wrestling Reunion at the Glasgow Wrestling Center

4:00 PM
Alumni Baseball Game @ Reds Baseball Field. Sign ups at 3:30 PM game at 4 PM.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
There will be a reception during the All Class Reunion on Saturday, June 18th @ 4 to 5:30 P.M. Everyone is invited to attend, especially the Class of 1977. Wheatgrass Art Gallery presents an art show featuring the watercolors of the late Nancy Etchart. This exhibit showcases Etchart’s resilience and love of life through her art. The exhibit can be viewed at the Wheatgrass Arts and Gallery, at 523 2nd Avenue South, for the months of May and June.

8:00 PM - 1:00 AM
Street Dance downtown Glasgow.

7:00 PM - 2:30 AM
Valley County Sheriff , Search & Rescue, Long Run Fire, Departments will be providing FREE transportation from Downtown Glasgow to your place of lodging or home. Buses will leave the downtown area every hour and half hour. Bus Pickup locations are in front of the Stockman’s Bar, Eastside of the Elks Club on 3rd Street, intersection of 3rd Ave. and 5th street, and FCB parking lot. Please play it safe don’t drink and drive!

9:30 PM to 3:00 AM
Late Night Breakfast @ Milk River Activity Center @ 219 2nd Ave. S.
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Sunday June 19th
We are promoting the use of local church services instead of Cowboy Church

View Church Locations and Times

7:30 AM to 11:30 AM
Breakfast available for purchase @ St. Raphaels Church Parish Center.

8:00 AM to 10:00 AM
Till we meet again Coffee & Doughnut Social @ Event Center.

Delegates Of Montana Constitutional Convention Gather In Helena To Celebrate 50th Anniversary Of Constitution

Friday, June 17th 2022

Remaining delegates of the 1972 Montana Constitutional Convention and their families gathered Wednesday in the House of Representatives chambers at the state Capitol to celebrate the document’s 50th anniversary.

It was the opening day of a two-day celebration and included a roll call in which each delegate or a family member could say a few words.

Many did.

Some talked of serving as a delegate and some, including the relatives, said the experience was a highlight of the delegate’s life.

“It feels like family always when the convention delegates get together,” Gene Harbaugh, 1972 convention delegate from Poplar, said in his invocation.

“Each of us had our faults, yet in an artful way you brought us together … so that a foundation for community could be forged,” he said.

Participants say provisions in the new constitution of a right to a clean and healthful environment, a right to privacy and the public’s right to know were ahead of their time. The delegates included a unique mandate to teach in the classroom about American Indians.

The new Montana Constitution has 15 sections and defines the powers of the three branches of the government. It was adopted by the Constitutional Convention on March 22, 1972, and ratified by a vote of the people, with a 2,532 vote margin, on June 6, 1972.

Gov. Greg Gianforte welcomed an estimated 200 attendees in a recorded message and noted “Montana had a profound impact in making government more effective.”

Among those attending Wednesday was delegate Mae Nan Ellingson, who, along with delegate Bob Campbell, wrote the preamble.

She believes the document has performed “brilliantly” since its passage.

Ellingson said people are much in agreement that it has held up well.

“It serves the people of Montana and can continue to do so for future generations,” she said.

In 1972, 100 delegates -- 58 Democrats, 36 Republicans and six independents -- met in Helena to hammer out a new state constitution. Calls had been brewing for years to change the 1889 constitution pushed through by Copper King William Clark. But by the 1960s people in Montana were ready for change, and the copper kings no longer had their grip on the state.

Marshall Murray, president of the Montana Constitutional Convention Society, said preparation for the convention began in 1967 and for five years dominated the state. He said it was that preparation that helped the convention run smoothly.

”We were lucky because we were able to come in here and then do our job,” he said.

Murray said all meetings were open to the public and notice was given for each meeting.

“We started not knowing each other very well," he said. “One hundred people formed and did something together and that was significant in my opinion.”

On Wednesday the delegates and their families met in the chambers in the same seats they had 50 years ago.

Bob Campbell’s daughter, Elizabeth, spoke to the crowd.

“He would have wanted to be here so much,” she said, adding he died a few months ago and the Constitutional Convention was a big part of his identity.

She urged people to protect the rights of the constitution for future generations.

Shannon Cate-Schweyen spoke of her father Jerome Cate and how proud he was of the work that was done at the convention. She said later it was her first time attending a reunion.

“It was important to my dad and for me to be here,” she said.

George Harper Jr. remembered his dad, who served as a delegate from Helena. He came up with “Praise the Lord and pass the constitution,” which he said became the “bumper sticker slogan” of the convention. He brought a bumper sticker to show the crowd.


Arlyne Reichert, 96, the oldest living delegate, said delegates came from all walks of life.

“The one thing we had in common was a love for the state of Montana,” she said. “We forgot about party affiliation, we forgot about everything else. The important thing was Montana.”

Ellingson, who sat next to Reichert in 1972 and was known as Mae Nan Robinson, stood to comment, but said she was “still stinging” from 1972 notes from Convention President Leo Graybill Jr. that said “You can wrap it up now, Mrs. Robinson.”

Phillip Johnson, 75, was among the relatives who attended. His dad, Torrey B. Johnson of Busby, had served as a delegate.

“I love it — just the fact my dad served this way,” he said in his seat on the sidelines of the House.

The day continued with a lunch that included a speech by former Democratic Gov. Brian Schweitzer and several panels.

It continues Thursday with more panels and ends with a discussion at 5 p.m. featuring Ellingson and former Govs. Marc Racicot, a Republican, and Steve Bullock, a Democrat.

The 10 remaining delegates from the original 100 are: Frank Arness, Mae Nan Ellingson, Gene Harbaugh, Lynn Kelley, Jerry Loendorf, Lyle Monroe, Marshall Murray, Arlyne Reichert, Bob Vermillion and Roger Wagner.

Wagner, from Nashua was one of four delegates elected in 1971 to represent Sheridan, Roosevelt, Daniels and Valley County at the Constitutional Convention. The other delegates included Mark Etchart of Glasgow, Magnus Aasheim of Antelope and Gene Harbaugh of Poplar.

90% Of Voters In Valley County Primary Election Chose To Vote Absentee

Friday, June 17th 2022

In a recap of the June 7th Primary Election, 90% of the voters in Valley County chose to vote absentee. Only 203 voters cast their ballots on election day while 1983 Valley County voters chose to vote by absentee.

Voter turnout was 44.9 percent which is the lowest turnout for any election since the 2012 Primary Election in Valley County.

77% of the voters in Valley County chose to vote in the Republican Primary, 21% in the Democrat Primary and 2% in the Libertarian Primary.

Here is a rundown of voter turnout in Valley County since 2012:

2022 Primary- 44.9%
2020 General- 84%
2020 Primary- 60%
2018 General- 80%
2018 Primary- 56%
2016- General- 83%
2016- Primary- 56%
2014- General- 72%
2014- Primary- 49%
2012- General- 82%
2012- Primary- 44%

Dog/Cat Clinic In Glasgow On Saturday

Friday, June 17th 2022

Dog/Cat clinic for your pet licenses and shots!

Come on up to the Glasgow Police Department, Saturday, June 18, 2022, from 10 A.M. to 12 P.M.
Glasgow pet licenses are $5 per pet if they’re spayed or neutered. $20 per pet if they’re not. You must provide proof of rabies vaccine to purchase a pet license.

Valley County Pool Campaign Releases New 3D Design Of Proposed Pool

Thursday, June 16th 2022

Our NEW 3D Design of the pool is finally here!

Fun features that our current pool doesn't have:

Drop-Off Lane for safety of the kids
Designated Handicap Parking Spots (off the road)
Zero Depth Entry (ADA compliant)
Fence to protect the kids in the beach entry area from going into the deep end
Family bathroom
Community bathroom for families in the park
And SO MUCH MORE!

If you're here for the All Class Reunion, be sure to check out our table at Registration on Thursday, June 16th and Friday, June 17th along with our Informational Window at Markle's Hardware!

Alive At Five Returns This Wednesday

Wednesday, June 15th 2022

The Glasgow Downtown Association is holding its first Alive @ Five of the season tonight. The event has be moved indoors to the Elks Lodge due to wet and windy weather.

Come down from 5-8 and enjoy live music from Hannah Jo Lally, food, drinks, games, a hot dog eating contest, and family-friendly fun. Hot dog participants: it’s Dr. Andy Fahlgren v. Officer Josh Ames v. Marc Wethern in our first “Down the Dog” Challenge!

The event coincides with “Hump Day” promotions at various businesses. Shop locally and bring those receipts to the Glasgow Chamber for a chance at winning a Chamber Big Bucks prize.

Future Alive @ Five events will be held the 3rd Wednesday of each summer month.

Rides Offered During All Class Reunion

Wednesday, June 15th 2022

The Valley County Sheriff’s Office in partnership with Search & Rescue & the Long Run Fire Department are providing sober rides during the All Class Reunion Friday & Saturday.

Rides will be given from event headquarters to your lodging.

Friday call Randy Isakson-406-263-2193 or Shyanne Isakson-406-263-2505; Saturday call Dustin Brunelle-406-230-2689, Brianne Brunelle-406-839-4348, or Shyanne Isakson-406-263-2505.

Fort Peck Summer Theatre Continues 53rd Season With Iconic Musical The Bridges Of Madison County

Tuesday, June 14th 2022

Based on the best-selling novel and subsequent Oscar winning film starring Meryl Streep and Clint Eastwood, The Bridges of Madison County captures the lyrical expanse of America’s heartland along with the yearning entangled in the eternal question, “What if…?”

Winner of multiple 2014 Tony Awards, this sweeping romance about the roads we travel, the doors we open and the bridges we dare to cross, will leave audiences breathless.

Jaclyn Gonzalez Stapp and Royce McIntosh star in the roles of Francesca and Robert. Last season at FPST, Stapp starred as Mona Kent in Dames at Sea, and McIntosh was a member of the 50th Anniversary 2019 company, playing Sam in Mamma Mia and Tito in Lend Me a Tenor. Francesca’s family is played by Glasgow’s Tommi Prewett, Benjamin Wambeke and FPST Artistic Director Andy Meyers, with Brittany Archambeault, Alicia Bullock-Muth and Versee Damien also in principle roles. The ensemble features Hinsdale’s Codi Donniaquo and Saco’s Chayten Pippin, along with Sydney Hayward, Shy Iverson, Jay Michael Roberts and Bryan Songy.

Musically directed by Scott Koljonen, the live band is comprised of Luree Green-Chappell, Bergen Miller, Taylor Noll, Jayden Ostler and Ben Sellers.

Shelby Mariah Art and Meyers co-direct the production.

Performances are Fridays & Saturdays at 7:30pm, selected Saturday, 2 pm matinees and Sundays at 4:00pm. For tickets go to www.fortpecktheatre.org or call 406-228-9216. Theatre Box office opens May 26, 1-5 pm, Thursdays-Sundays, 406-526-9943.

The rotating schedule continues with Forever Plaid, The Compete History of America (Abridged!) and The Bridges of Madison County until July 10, followed by:
• Always…Patsy Cline: July 15 – 24
• Seussical: July 29 – August 14
• Wait Until Dark: August 19 – September 4

Update To Montana National Guard Flooding Response

Tuesday, June 14th 2022

Fort Harrison, Mont. – At the request of local officials, the Montana National Guard is continuing to assist with Search and Rescue operations due to significant flooding in South Central Montana.

Starting at 2:45 p.m. on Monday, the Montana National Guard began receiving requests to rescue stranded civilians using our military aircraft with hoist capability. Two helicopters were dispatched to assist.

The first helicopter rescued two people in Roscoe, Mont. and a further two in Fromberg, Mont.

The second helicopter recovered eight people in Cooke City, Mont.

At the conclusion of these missions, the aircraft pre-positioned in Billings to be prepared for any follow-on missions. Monday evening, two additional helicopters joined them.

On Tuesday, the Guard received a third request, to assist with a Search and Rescue in the vicinity of East Rosebud Lake.

The Montana National Guard is also sending a group of Soldiers to Red Lodge, Mont. to establish a command center to assist with coordinating further Search and Rescue activity in the region.

During these Search and Rescue missions, aircrews were able to safely capture photos of their missions. These photos have been posted to the Montana National Guard Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/MTGUARDOFFICIAL.

Potential further deployments of helicopter and ground support are being examined. The Montana National Guard can provide assistance at the request of and in support of our local and state partners.