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Latest Local News
Thursday, April 19th 2018
Governor Bullock Declares State of Emergency in Valley County due to flooding
– Governor Steve Bullock today issued an executive order declaring a state of emergency due to flooding in seven counties, and on the Fort Belknap Indian reservation and in the Town of Chester.

“As Montanans are faced with flooding, we are doing everything necessary at the state level to protect health and safety, and to preserve lives, property, and resources,” said Governor Bullock. “We continue to keep in close communication with local and tribal officials as we monitor conditions around the state.”

Rapid snowmelt and flooding have impacted the Milk River Basin and Marias River Basin with the potential to cause widespread damage to farmland, private residences, and critical infrastructure. Near-record snowpack in nearly every river basin across Montana is soon expected to begin to melt off as temperatures begin to rise.

The executive order has been issued for the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, the Town of Chester, and Pondera, Hill, Blaine, Valley, Toole, Liberty, and Petroleum Counties.

The executive order authorizes the availability and utilization of necessary state government services, equipment and supplies. It also allows the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to utilize sandbags and other resources available for critical infrastructure protection.

Additionally, Governor Bullock has established a Multi-Agency Coordinating Group to keep informed of the flooding situation statewide. The State Emergency Coordination Center continues to work closely with local and tribal jurisdictions.

Wednesday, April 18th 2018
FWP Anticipates that Area Ponds May Have Some Winterkill in Region 6
Pictured: Even with a windmill aeration system, the combination of low water levels, lots of aquatic vegetation and heavy snow cover can lead to low winter dissolved oxygen levels and ultimately to dead fish

It has been a winter for the books in Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6. After the summer of 2017 that was plagued by record drought conditions, the 2017-2018 winter will go down as the 2nd snowiest winter on record in Havre (92.5”) and the 3rd snowiest on record in Glasgow (63.2”) as of April 9. In addition, the month of February was the coldest on record since 1979, according to the National Weather Service. As we are finally moving into spring, many folks are wondering how a winter like this may affect small pond fish populations.

Winterkills of fish periodically occur on smaller, shallower ponds (usually 12 feet deep or less), due to marginal depths to support fish populations. The key component on whether a winterkill occurs is largely tied to the levels of dissolved oxygen in the water.
Over the last couple of weeks, FWP fisheries personnel have been trying to access some of the smaller ponds and reservoirs in the region to monitor oxygen levels in these waterbodies. Some ponds have been observed to be holding strong and maintaining adequate oxygen levels for over-winter fish survival. On others, very low oxygen levels have been measured indicating that a winterkill has likely occurred. In one instance, crews drilled holes in the ice and observed dead fathead minnows floating up through the holes. Not a good sign.

Why are we likely to see more winterkill this year? There are many factors that contribute to this.

During the dry summer of 2017, many of the ponds in the region were observed to be several feet below full pool. These lower water levels allowed for greater light penetration through the water column and created conditions for increased aquatic vegetation growth.

While this vegetation growth is not necessarily a bad thing during the summer, snow-covered ice during the winter prevents sunlight from penetrating the water, causing the aquatic vegetation to die. This dead vegetation then begins to decompose, a process which consumes oxygen from the water. As more oxygen is consumed from the water, there is less available for fish. If oxygen levels become too low, fish may begin to die. As these dead fish decompose, more oxygen is removed from the water and the entire process begins to escalate.

In some cases, windmill aeration systems have been installed in ponds to help minimize the effects of a long winter, as they are key to helping keep oxygen levels adequate for fish survival. However, if a pond enters the winter with already low water levels, especially if its max depth is less than 12 feet, even this supplemental aeration may not be enough to guarantee fish survival through a winter like this year.

While it is always disappointing to hear of a pond experiencing a winterkill, there is a positive side to it all. In the spring when all this snow melts, most of these smaller ponds will get a much-needed shot of water and hopefully fill up. These higher water levels often lead to increased overall productivity of the pond and they will once again provide suitable fish habitat.

FWP will work to stock fish into those ponds which have winterkilled through several different means. For rainbow trout fisheries, this usually means stocking hatchery trout as soon as conditions are favorable. For those species that are not raised in the hatchery system such as bluegill, crappie, and perch, crews will work to trap and transfer from certified disease-free sources to those ponds that need to have their fish populations re-established.

Unfortunately, due to recent reductions to both the hatchery system and regional fisheries budgets, all ponds may not be re-stocked in 2018. Ponds will be prioritized to maximize available resources with the goal of providing anglers ample opportunity to enjoy the quality multi-species fisheries they have come to expect in Region 6.

Wednesday, April 18th 2018
Glasgow School Teacher Salaries Compared to Salaries of Teachers in other School Districts
Glasgow School Superintendent Bob Connors has released a comparison of Glasgow teacher salaries compared to other schools in Montana. The Glasgow School Board asked Connors to compare Glasgow salaries with teachers in the public Class C schools, schools of similar sized high schools and area schools.

The Glasgow School District is asking voters to approve a levy in the amount of $127,694,48 for the purpose of recruiting and retention of quality educators.

The 1st year teacher pay for a Glasgow teacher for 2017-2018 is $30,485. When you compare that salary with other teachers of the 35 Class B schools, Glasgow is ranked 32nd ahead of Joliet, Malta and Choteau. Colstrip has the highest 1st year teacher pay for Class B Schools at $37,567. Poplar is ranked 2nd followed by Baker, Lame Deer and Columbus.

When you compare Glasgow teacher salaries with area schools:

Poplar: $35,975
Scobey: $33,081
Wolf Point: $30,348
Glasgow: $30,485
Malta: $29,175
Opheim: $29,413
Hinsdale: $29,189
Nashua: $28,020

Wednesday, April 18th 2018
American Legion Spring Meeting Is April 22
Mr. Joe Yeoman, District Commander of American Legion Highline District #1, said today about 55 Legionnaires and members of the Auxiliary are expected to attend the Spring meeting of District No. 1 on Sunday April 22, 2018 at the Poplar American Legion Post home.

Mr. Yeoman said there are about 800 Legionnaires in District No. 1. The Posts are located in Wolf Point, Glasgow, Hinsdale, Homestead, Poplar, Scobey, Plentywood, Brockton, Culbertson, Bainville, Nashua, Opheim and Westby.

Registration will begin at 9:00 a.m. at the Post home, located at 107 Daniels St. The Department program will begin at 10:00 a.m.

A joint banquet will begin at 12:00 pm at the school, with Department Commander Larry Dobb of Great Falls as guest speaker.

The Legion business meeting will begin at 1:30 p.m. at the Post home. District Commander Joe Yeoman of Glasgow will conduct the Legion meeting. District President Dana McColly of Hindsdale, will conduct the Auxiliary meeting.

Monday, April 16th 2018
Flood Warning in effect as Cherry Creek and Antelope Creek reported to be flooding
The National Weather Service in Glasgow has issued a

* Flood Warning for Small Streams for...
Snowmelt in...
Central Valley County in northeastern Montana...

* Until 800 AM MDT Thursday

* At 800 AM MDT, Trained spotters reported flooding on Cheery Creek
and Antelope Creek near Glasgow. Flooding has been reported on
Billingsly Road west of Glasgow. Snow melt run off will continue
to produce flooding on small streams the next few days.

* Some locations that will experience flooding include...
Glasgow, Tampico, The Bentonite Plant and Vandalia.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

Turn around, don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood
deaths occur in vehicles.
Monday, April 16th 2018
Glasgow School District Election Set For May 8th
Notice is hereby given by the undersigned Clerk of Glasgow School District #1A, Valley County, State of Montana that the Annual School Election will be held on Tuesday, May 8, 2018 by mail ballot. Ballots can be mailed to P.O. Box 28, Glasgow, MT 59230, or may be delivered to the School Administration Office located at 229 7th St N, Glasgow Montana. Times for delivery are 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday before Election Day, and 8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. on Election Day.

Electors will consider the following issues at the election:

Two Trustees to be elected for 3-year terms

Mill levy proposition to finance the District’s General Fund


A qualified registered elector who will be absent from the district during the time the election is being conducted may: a) vote in person in the election administrator’s office as soon as the ballots are available and until noon the day before the ballots are scheduled to be mailed; b) make a written request, signed by the applicant and addressed to the election administrator, that the ballot be mailed to an address other than the address that appears on the registration card. The district clerk/election administrator’s office is located at 229 7th St N, Glasgow Montana.

If you miss the regular registration deadline (30 days prior to the election), you may still register for the election by going to the county election office up to and including on election day. Between noon and the close of business on the day before Election Day, you may complete and submit a voter registration card, but you will need to return to the district voting location on Election Day to pick up and vote a ballot. The county election office is located at 501 Court Square, Glasgow Montana

Monday, April 16th 2018
3D Deer Removed from Glasgow FWP Headquarters
A 3D deer just like this one was removed from the FWP headquarters property in Glasgow Sunday. It was being used in a hunter education class demonstration, and someone likely picked it up thinking it fell out of a pickup or something, as it was close to Airport road.

Please help us return this educational deer to the FWP headquarters if you or someone you know picked it up.

Saturday, April 14th 2018
National Weather Service Revises Flood Outlook
Friday, April 13th 2018
Flood Outlook on Milk River improves according to National Weather Service
The flood outlook has improved on the Milk River according to the National Weather Service. Stan Ozark visited with Patrick Gilchrist today and he reported on the good news.

Patrick Gilchrist.

Wednesday, April 11th 2018
Region 6 Volunteer Hunter and Bowhunter Education Instructors Honored
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks honored the service of its Region 6 Hunter and Bowhunter Education volunteer instructors at the annual workshop, which was held on Saturday, March 24, in Wolf Point and on Sunday, March 25, in Havre.

The workshop is an annual event that invites all the volunteer instructors across the region for a day filled with visiting, updates to the program, demonstrations of new equipment and ideas, and most importantly, honoring years of service. This was the first time in Region 6 that two workshops were held, with the idea that more instructors could attend.

Receiving awards at this year’s workshop were numerous instructors with service ranging from 5 to 45 years (please see the list below). All service award recipients receive a plaque, with other milestones receiving special awards, including: 10 year: engraved knife; 20 year: FWP belt buckle; 30 year: voucher for purchase of a firearm; 45 year: Filson vest. Highlighting this year’s awards were Ken Wiederrick of Malta and Jon Forbes of Saco, who have been instructing for 30 years, and Roger Wimmer of Wolf Point, who has been an instructor for 45 years.

“As evidenced by the decades of service our instructors give to our programs, there’s an incredible amount of dedication and commitment out there in our communities,” said FWP Region 6 Information and Education Program Manager Marc Kloker. “These volunteers play a key role in shaping future Montana hunters by providing training in safety, ethics, conservation, and the proper use of firearms and archery equipment. Ken Wiederrick and Jon Forbes, and others like them, work very hard to pass the state’s rich hunting heritage on to the next generations.”

“Roger Wimmer has been an instructor for 45 years…that is three generations of hunters he has taught,” Kloker continued. “It’s just remarkable that Roger and other volunteers have that type of long-term dedication. Please be sure to thank your local hunter and bowhunter education instructors when you see them.”

Also receiving a special award, for the Region 6 instructor of the year, was Rick Harman of Havre. “I have seen Rick’s dedication and commitment to hunter education firsthand,” says Kloker. “He is the local lead instructor in Havre, which has the largest population of hunter education students in the region. Rick does a great job coordinating instructors, relates well to students, demonstrates all aspects of safe and responsible hunting, and is a very dedicated instructor.”

In addition to the awards, many door prizes were also given away. Donations from Glasgow businesses D&G Sports and Western and Markle’s Ace Hardware, along with items provided by FWP, allowed everyone to go away with something.

FWP is thankful to have hundreds of qualified instructors across the state, and always welcomes new additions. For information on becoming a Hunter or Bowhunter Education instructor in Region 6, please contact Marc Kloker at 406-228-3704, or go to the website at fwp.mt.gov/education/hunter/instructors/ to learn more and apply.

Region 6 Hunter and Bowhunter Education Award List

5 Year Hunter Ed
Seth Axtman, Daniels
Ryan Williamson, Sheridan

5 Year Bowhunter Ed
Carmen Fast Horse, Valley/Roosevelt
David Moon, Valley

10 Year Hunter Ed
Scott Kinzie, Roosevelt
Ryan Pawlowski, McCone
Shane Reed, Roosevelt
Joe Wiles, Valley

10 Year Bowhunter Ed
Todd Alisch, Hill
Scott Kinzie, Roosevelt
Joe Wiles, Valley

15 Year Hunter Ed
Colleen Buck, Sheridan
Thornton Lindsay, Hill
Andrew McKean, Valley

15 Year Bowhunter Ed
Nick Siebrasse, Hill

20 Year Hunter Ed
Charles Coe, Hill
Rick Fisher, Blaine
Kenneth Hannah, Hill
Marlene Hannah, Hill
Mark Stole, Hill

25 Year Hunter Ed
Larry Cornelia, McCone
Darwin Anderson, Hill
Mike Carr, Hill
Miles Hutton, Blaine

30 Year Hunter Ed
Kenneth Wiederrick, Phillips
Jon Forbes, Phillips

45 Year Hunter Ed
Roger Wimmer, Roosevelt

Wednesday, April 11th 2018
Some Region 6 Block Management Areas Open For 2018 Spring Turkey Season
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and participating land owners will open some Block Management Areas (BMAs) for spring turkey hunting along the Milk River and one area south of Zortman.

Twelve areas will be open for the spring turkey season, beginning April 14, and running through May 20. Most of the properties are located along the Milk River between Hinsdale and Nashua. One additional property is located just south of Zortman in Goslin Flats, which is a portion of the Square Butte BMA.

“The BMA spring turkey hunt worked well for both landowners and hunters the last few years, and landowners are looking forward to opening their property again this spring,” said Tim Potter, Jr., Region 6 FWP Hunting Access Coordinator. “We are very pleased that we are able to provide this opportunity again. Just remember that many of these properties are in the middle of calving and other farming activities during the spring.

“There also may be rising flood waters due to the high amount of snowpack we’ve received this winter,” added Potter. “Please be cautious and respectful around these properties as well with other landowners not in the program.”

BMA access will be granted through a traditional sign-in box on the properties, and will be advertised by a green sign titled “Spring Turkey.” Signing in will allow hunters access only for turkey hunting. Other activities such as shed hunting, fishing, or small game hunting are not allowed. Permission for such activities must be separately allowed by the landowner.

All BMA rules and expectations in place during the general season will still apply. These include, but are not limited to, leaving gates as they are found, areas of walk-in hunting only, parking in designated parking areas, using caution around livestock, taking care not to drive on muddy roads, and more. Hunters should refer to the individual rules associated with each BMA, found on the back of the BMA maps.
Property boundaries may not be well marked, so hunters need to be aware of their location. “For this opportunity to continue to move forward, we need hunters to respect both the landowner’s wishes and their property,” said Potter.

As a reminder, prospective turkey hunters can also hunt on Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs), such as the Hinsdale and Vandalia WMAs, other public land, and on other private land with permission. Hunters must also be aware that there are several BMAs that are not participating in this spring hunting opportunity, and permission would be needed to hunt on these properties.

A list of participating landowners and properties is available from FWP’s Region 6 headquarters in Glasgow, by calling the office at 406-228-3700, or by going to the regional webpage at fwp.mt.gov/regions/r6/. Spring turkey opportunities will also be listed, and maps are available, on the Hunt Planner on the fwp.mt.gov website.

Wednesday, April 11th 2018
Plant a Food Plot for Game Birds this Spring, and Receive Incentives!
The cold, snowy, and lingering winter we’ve had across the state has many citizens concerned about game birds such as pheasants, grouse, and partridge. Although these species are well adapted to make it through even tough winters, there is something landowners can do to help birds next winter- plant a food plot!

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks has two options to help landowners establish food plots for game birds: standing grain plots and NEW diverse seed mixes.

Standing grain plots: For standing grain plots, FWP will pay landowners $150 per acre to help offset the costs of seeding. Standing grain plots are most suitable if landowners have odd field corners or edges of crop fields near dense winter cover that they can leave unharvested.

Diverse seed mixes: With our new seed mixes, the FWP is offering free bags of seed that will cover up to 5 acres, and landowners who plant the mixes will still receive the $150 per acre to offset planting costs.

FWP encourages landowners to try out the new free seed mixes. They are designed to provide critical brood-rearing cover for game bird chicks in summer, and they contain tall, stiff plants like sorghum and sunflowers that can stand up to snow and provide easily accessible food all winter long.

Whether planting one of the new mixes or leaving standing grain, all plots need to be located within ¼ mile of dense winter cover such as a brushy draw, shelterbelts, or a cattail wetland. In return for seed and payments, landowners must sign a written agreement to leave the plots standing until the following spring, and to allow some public access for upland game bird hunting in the fall. If you are interested in planting food plots for wildlife this spring, please contact Region 6 FWP Game Bird Specialist Ken Plourde at 406-474-2244 before May 1.
Wednesday, April 11th 2018
Bowhunter Education Class Offered in Glasgow for Youth and Adults
A Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Bowhunter Education course date has been set for the Glasgow area. There will be a regular youth classroom course starting on Wed., May 2, and an adult online “field day” course on Sun., May 6.

Archery hunters must have purchased a Montana bow and arrow license prior to hunting during the archery-only season. To purchase a bow and arrow license an individual must meet one of the following requirements:
· show completion of a bowhunter education course
· show proof of purchase of a previous year’s bow and arrow license from Montana or another state

*Signed affidavits are no longer acceptable as proof of bowhunter education.

The youth classroom course will be held at the FWP headquarters in Glasgow. All registrants for the classroom course must be at least 11 years of age by May 2. To hunt during the archery-only season, youth need to be at least 12-years old by January 16, 2019. This may be the only archery class offered in the Glasgow area this year, so please make plans to attend if you have an interest in hunting this archery season.

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online bowhunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. This Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course. The adult field course will be held from 1 p.m.-5 p.m. on Sun., May 6, also at the FWP headquarters.

Classroom students need to pick up the “Today’s Bowhunter” manual from the FWP office in Glasgow. Students are to read each chapter and complete all chapter review exercises before the start of class.

Both classroom and adult students need to register online to take the course. To register and learn more about the bowhunter education classes offered, please go to the FWP website at www.fwp.mt.gov and look under the “Education” tab. If there are any questions, please call course coordinator Marc Kloker at 406-228-3704.

Wednesday, April 11th 2018
BLM to hold meeting in Glasgow regarding grazing leases on BLM land.
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is asking for the public’s help in determining what it should analyze as it considers proposed changes to several grazing leases.

American Prairie Reserve (APR) controls private properties tied to 18 BLM grazing allotments in Fergus, Petroleum, Phillips, and Valley Counties. They have submitted a proposal asking the BLM to modify their grazing permits. APR is seeking permission to: change the class of livestock from cattle to bison; allow for season-long grazing; fortify existing external boundary fences by replacing the second strand from the top with an electrified wire; and remove interior fences.

The BLM plans to analyze all 18 grazing allotments in one Environmental Assessment (EA) to consolidate efforts across the district.

“We are asking the public to provide input on what they feel needs to be analyzed in the EA,” said BLM North Central Montana District Manager Mark Albers. “The most helpful comments are those that describe specific issues upon which we should focus our analysis, rather than a personal opinion on the relative merits of the proposed changes.”

The BLM will hold four open-house style scoping meetings to provide the public with information about the proposal and the National Environmental Policy Act process.


April 11 - Old Junior High Gym, 505 S 3rd Ave. E., Malta, Mont.

April 12 - Cottonwood Inn, 54250 U.S. 2, Glasgow, Mont.

All scoping meeting will run from 1:30 to 5 p.m. The scoping period runs from April 9 to May 9, 2018. After scoping comments are received and reviewed, a Draft Environmental Assessment will be produced and released to the public for a 30-day review period. During that review period, BLM will return to these same communities and host meetings to gather input from the public.

The BLM is Making America Great through Shared Conservation. The BLM welcomes and values your diverse views. Scoping comments can be emailed to blm_mt_scoping_ncmd@blm.gov or mailed to: APR Scoping Comments, BLM Malta Field Office, 47285 Highway 2, Malta, MT 59538.

Scoping comments may be subject to Freedom of Information Act requests. Do not include in your scoping comments personally identifiable information you do not want to be made public.

Tuesday, April 10th 2018
2017-2018 is the 3rd snowiest winter on record for Glasgow
Seasonal Snowfall total for Glasgow is 64.3" of snow, which puts us in 3rd snowiest winter.

4th snowiest was 62.3" in 2012-13

2nd snowiest was 70.3" in 2003-04.

Snowiest was 108.6" of snow in 2010-11.

BTW, our normal snowfall from 1970-2010 was 30". From 1980-2010 it is 36". We've added two more significant snowfall totals since 2010, so the 1990-2020 normals will likely be even higher yet.

Monday, April 9th 2018
Increased Water Releases From Fort Peck Planned For April
Water releases from Fort Peck Dam were increased to 9,000 cubic feet per second at the end of March in preparation for runoff from a snowpack in the upper Missouri River Basin that has hit 127 percent of normal.

The reservoir ended March at an elevation of 2,236 feet, rising 2.1 feet during the month, according to the Army Corps of Engineers, which operates the dam. The reservoir is expected to rise 1.6 feet during April ending the month near elevation 2,237.6 feet.

Last year the lake topped out at 2,240 by the end of June. Full pool is 2,234 but the lake can rise to 2,246, which is the top of the flood pool.

The Corps Missouri River Basin Water Management Division will be conducting five public meetings throughout the basin April 17-19, including one on April 19 at Fort Peck State Fish Hatchery at 10 a.m.

The purpose of the meetings is to update the region on current hydrologic conditions and the planned operation of the mainstem reservoir system during the coming months.

The 2018 runoff forecast in the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa, is 30.2 million acre feet , 119 percent of average.

Thursday, April 5th 2018
Red Thumb Day Set For April 10th
An Epidemic is sweeping across America causing drivers everywhere to black out for five seconds at a time. It is called TEXTING and DRIVING. Sending or receiving a text takes a driver’s eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds—the equivalent -at 55 mph- of driving the length of an entire football field—blind. On Red Thumb Reminder Day, we paint thumb nails “red” and hand out “red” thumb bands as an obvious reminder for all drivers to focus on driving safely. Each time someone opens a car door or places their hands on the steering wheel, the “red” thumbs will remind everyone to NOT text and drive.

The 3rd Annual Red Thumb Reminder Day is on Tuesday, April 10th. Please join the Valley County Health Department, along with Glasgow High School, Glasgow Middle School, JMG and GHS Student Council members, and community participants to our community “WALK” downtown. Participants may start the “WALK” at any of these four locations: in front of the City/County Library on 3rd Avenue South, Community Room of the Court house, The Loaded Toad, and the Police Department/Fire Department. Each of these locations will have an Anti-texting and Driving Activity. Participants will earn a stamp at each location. Completed cards will all earn a RTRD 2018 t-shirt and be entered in a drawing to win one of these awesome prizes: Samsung Galaxy 16 GB WiFi Tablet, Wireless Earbuds, Coffee Cards and more!

Our local law enforcement will be providing presentations to the High School and Middle School students during school on April 10th. All ages are welcome to join the fun activities downtown for the “Walk” from 3:30-6:00, go to any of the locations, pick up a card, and earn stamps!

We hope that everyone will participate on April 10th.for our Red Thumb Reminder Day “Walk”. Come walk with us and participate in our activities – get your mug shot, have a snack, try the obstacle course and seat belt convincer — to increase awareness of the dangers of texting and driving. Sign a pledge to never text and drive. Non-driver’s may sign a pledge to “remind your ride” to never text and drive. Paint your thumb nails “red”, get your card stamped with 4 stamps, get a t-shirt and be entered into a drawing to win one of our awesome prizes. You can’t possibly find anything more fun to do on a Tuesday!

We would like to thank the sponsors of our event—without you our event would not be possible. Special thank you to KLTZ Radio, Glasgow Courier, BS Buzz Central, Glasgow High School, Glasgow Middle School, JMG Kids, GHS Student Council, reAct Youth Coalition, Irle School, Reynolds Market, Busted Knuckle Brewery, First Community Bank, Glasgow City/County Library, Nemont Telephone, The Loaded Toad, TaxMasters, Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital, Montana Highway Patrol, Valley County Sheriff’s Department, Glasgow Police Department, Glasgow Fire Department, Nemont Beverages, D&G Sports and Western, and supporting parents and teachers.
Any sponsor or volunteer who would like to be a part of our Annual Red Thumb Reminder Day Walk, please call 406-228-6261. Our goal is to reach everyone in our community, to increase awareness of the dangers of texting and driving, and to change behaviors.
No life is worth sending or receiving a text message.
Please don’t text and drive! It can wait!

Thursday, April 5th 2018
Milk River expected to flood this month
Flooding is expected on the Milk River at Glasgow this month. Stan Ozark visited with Patrick Gilchrist of the National Weather Service in Glasgow and he talks flooding potential.

Patrick Gilchrist.

Thursday, April 5th 2018
Business Plan Development Classes Scheduled
Great Northern Development Corporation, Small Business Development Center is hosting a business plan competition throughout a seven-county region in Northeastern Montana consisting of Valley, Garfield, McCone, Richland, Roosevelt, Sheridan, and Daniels. The goal of this event is to attract new entrepreneurs and support existing businesses in Northeastern Montana by uniting communities in a common goal of economic development. Through many generous sponsorships from local businesses and chambers of commerce in the region GNDC will award two prize packages of $5,000; one to a startup business and one to an existing business.

SBDC Director Shandy Hanks will be holding business plan development classes in each of the participating seven counties. Entrepreneurs planning to compete in the Minnow Tank Business Plan competition are encouraged to attend a class. Class topics include Business Plan Basics, Marketing, and Small Business Financials. Check the schedule below to find a business plan development class coming to your location. If you are unable to attend a class please call GNDC to schedule an appointment with SBDC Director Shandy Hanks at (406) 653-2590 ext 203. Minnow Tank business plan submissions are due to GNDC by 5:00 PM on July 27th. Submissions can be mailed to GNDC at 233 Cascade Street or sent via e-mail to sbdc@gndc.org. Please visit www.gndc.org to read Minnow Tank official application guidelines and procedures.

The Minnow Tank finale will be held September 22, 2018, at 5:00 PM at the Cottonwood Inn in Glasgow where fourteen finalists will present their business plan live to a panel of five judges, one judge being the audience! Support your favorite entrepreneur by planning to attend the Minnow Tank finale on September 22nd; tickets will be available at the door or by calling GNDC. If you are a new or existing business interested in applying for Minnow Tank, or if you have questions about the event, contact Shandy Hanks or Mark Sansaver at (406) 653-2590, or visit www.gndc.org.

Class Schedule
Wolf Point, May 16th 10:00-12:00, GNDC 233 Cascade Street
Glasgow, May 16th 2:00-4:00, Senior Center 328 4th Ave S
Jordan, May 18th 10:00-12:00, Senior Center 942 Jordan Ave
Circle, May 18th 2:00-4:00, Senior Center 212 Main Street
Sidney, May 23rd 2:00-4:00, Richland County Extension 1499 N Central Ave
Plentywood, May 29th 10:00-12:00, Jubilee Room 224 S Main Street
Scobey, May 29th 2:00-4:00, Nemont Friendship Room 2 Railroad Ave

Thursday, April 5th 2018
Corps Schedules Public Meetings
OMAHA, NE – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Missouri River Basin Water Management Division will be conducting five public meetings throughout the basin April 17-19. The purpose of these meetings is to update the region on current hydrologic conditions and the planned operation of the mainstem reservoir system during the coming months.

The 2018 runoff forecast in the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa, is 30.2 million acre feet (MAF), 119 percent of average according to the Corps. “The updated forecast increased slightly from last month due to the continued accumulation of mountain and plains snowpack in the upper basin,” said John Remus, Chief of the Missouri River Basin Water Management Division. “Based on the current plains and mountain snowpack and precipitation outlooks, runoff into the Fort Peck and Garrison reservoirs is expected to be above average from March through August,” said Remus. For comparison, the 2017 runoff was 29.6 MAF, 117 percent of average.

As of April 1, the mountain snowpack was 127 percent of average in the reach above Fort Peck and in the reach from Fort Peck to Garrison. Normally the mountain snowpack peaks in mid-April. View the mountain snowpack graphic here.

Plains snowpack is currently heaviest in central and eastern Montana. The snowpack’s liquid content, or snow water equivalency (SWE), ranges from 2 to 8 inches in localized areas. The remaining areas of the upper basin have much less plains snowpack, ranging from trace amounts to 3 inches of SWE. The Corps is cooperating with other agencies to acquire plains snow measurements in the upper basin.

The Missouri River mainstem reservoir system (System) began the 2018 runoff season at the base of the annual flood control pool, providing the full 16.3 MAF of flood control storage to capture runoff. System storage was 58.3 MAF as of April 1, occupying 2.2 MAF of the 16.3 MAF flood control zone. “More than 85 percent of the System’s flood storage remains available to capture runoff from the remaining plains snowpack and spring rainfall as well as the runoff from the mountain snowmelt,” said Remus.”

In mid-March, Gavins Point releases were increased from 20,000 to 24,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) in support of the Missouri River navigation season which began April 1 near St. Louis, Mo. “Because of the higher than average runoff forecast, the service level was increased 10,000 cfs above full service to provide beneficial use of the excess runoff while reducing flood risk,” said Remus. Although the service level was increased, releases from Gavins Point ranged from 22,000 to 24,000 cfs during late March to reduce flood risk along the lower Missouri River while flows in tributaries downstream of Gavins Point remained high.

As tributary flows recede, releases from Gavins Point will be increased until they reach the expanded navigation support levels. Gavins Point releases will be adjusted, if needed, in response to basin conditions. When necessary, the Corps will reduce releases from the System projects and utilize the available flood control space in the reservoirs, in order to lessen downstream river levels; however, the ability to significantly reduce flood risk along the lower Missouri River diminishes at locations further downstream due to the large uncontrolled drainage area and the travel time from Gavins Point Dam.
Weekly updates on basin conditions, reservoir levels and other topics of interest can be viewed here: .

The Corps will continue to monitor basin conditions, river ice conditions, and plains and mountain snow accumulation, and will adjust the regulation of the System based on the most up-to-date information.

Spring Public Meetings
Meeting times and locations are listed below.

Tuesday, April 17 – Smithville, MO
Start time: 10 a.m. (CDT)
Jerry Litton Visitor Center
16311 DD Hwy

Tuesday, April 17 – Omaha, NE
Start time: 4 p.m. (CDT)
Nebraska Regulatory Office
8901 South 154th St.

Wednesday, April 18 – Pierre, SD
Start time: 10 a.m. (CDT)
Ramkota Hotel
920 W Sioux Ave.

Wednesday, April 18 – Bismarck, ND
Start time: 6 p.m. (CDT)
Bismarck State College, National Energy Center of Excellence (NECE), Bldg. 15, Rm 335
1200 Schafer Street

Thursday, April 19 – Fort Peck, MT
Start time: 10 a.m. (MDT)
Fort Peck State Fish Hatchery
277 Montana Highway 117

Wednesday, April 4th 2018
Glasgow Mayor Becky Erickson Writes Letter to Citizens of Glasgow
Letter to the residents of Glasgow,
I would like to share with you some of the City of Glasgow’s accomplishments that took place in 2017 and what are some of our goals are for 2018.
I will be updating you on different subjects and projects, and our progress via Glasgow Courier, City of Glasgow web site and KLTZ/KLAN.

Today I would like to address our levee system.

2017 was a pivotal year for the City of Glasgow as we worked on numerous issues. Some of those issues were resolved; some were taken to the next level, and some evolved into other issues. We also took on a number of projects, some that were completed and some that pave the way to “more of what matters” most!

At the top of the list regarding issues was our continued work on the Glasgow Cherry Creek Levee System. At this point, I’d like to give a shout out to the Glasgow Levee Committee. As many of you may have already heard, the Levee Committee was instrumental in drafting and submitting Glasgow’s SWIFT Plan to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers for our levee system. I can’t thank all of the volunteers of that committee enough for all their hard work and effort. This was the first plan that was accepted in the nation! It was written by local citizens and in house, not by an engineering firm. In 2017, as we entered the second year under the SWIFT Plan, we completed a major strategic project that was a component of the SWIFT plan. I am referring to the Feasibility and Risk Management Study. In spring of 2017 we submitted Glasgow’s Feasibility and Risk Management Study to the USACE for review. The project was critical for us to understand all the implications and associate economics costs associated with the proposed fixes to Glasgow’s levee system. At this point, we just recently received feedback from the USACE on the proposed fixes to the levee system. The City is currently responding to that feedback. On other related matters to the levee system, 2017 marked more committed and productive “boots on the ground” approach to maintenance of the levee system. While we still have a lot of work to do on the levee in regards to maintenance, both the USACE and local residents noted a marked improvement in the overall condition and ascetics of the levee. We look forward to carrying that momentum into 2018 and not only completing more “in-house” maintenance work but also working on a contracted storm drainage construction project as well as completing right-of-way and easement work along the levee.

In 1916 the levee was first conceived. In 1928 initial construction by LOCAL INDIVIDUALS WITH LOCAL FUNDING started because of continus property damage and loss of lives caused by the 1927 flood and to prevent further damage by a spring flood to the south side of Glasgow. From 1936 to 1938 the USACE extended and built onto the levee and the federal government covered that accost.
THE PROBLEM WE ARE FACING TODAY IS THAT BETWEEN THE YEARS OF 1928 TO 1938 NO EASEMENTS WERE FILED. And of course the outside wall of the levee grew due to additional dirt being added over the years. That has caused the current situation that there is not a 15 foot buffer zone from the toe of the levee to certain private properties that are being labeled as encroachments.
The Feasibility and Risk Management Study outlined 3 alternatives. The City could not choose dropping out of the program. If the City was not certified FEMA would remap the flood plain and this would mean from $999,000.00 to 2.1 million annually for business and home owners of the south side would pay annually in flood insurance and would have to maintain the system not being part of the program. If the City had damage to our critical facilities that produce and distribute drinking water and to treat and discharge sanitary waste water produced by the whole community the cost alone of these 2 major facilities alone would be more of a financial burden that the City could afford to self insure, not to mention replacement costs of other critical services.

The City of Glasgow choose to acquire the rights to the land from the county, on the northwest section of the levee, look at acquiring a combination of purchasing pieces of private land that are affected by the levee in the southwest and southeast sections and add to the outside of the levy. This cost is estimated at 3.4 million dollars.
We are currently:
* Working with our Congressional Offices for financial assistance to put our City back into “active status.”
* Putting dollar amounts to the permits the USACE have informed us we will need to have in place.
* Continuing maintenance of the levee outside of the encroachments.
* The Storm drainage project is in design mode and ready for spring.
* Working on the right of way acquisitions from the County
* Striving to complete the work by 2022.
The City Council understands it is our obligation is to meet citizen’s expectations for a safe, effective and sustainable levee system, promote health safety and well being of the Community. We will continue to diligently address this issue until it is completed.
I thank you and am grateful you have given me the honor to serve Glasgow. I know together we can improve the quality of life in our community on the prairie.

Sincerely,
Becky Erickson, Mayor

Tuesday, April 3rd 2018
Fort Peck Tribal Law Enforcement Agencies Penalized By Federal Agencies
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Two federal agencies penalized the Fort Peck tribal law enforcement agency for failing to repay $1.6 million in federal police money used for other purposes and for failing to conduct background checks on officers.

The Department of Justice designated the tribes as high-risk in December 2015, after the tribe — over a period of nine years — failed to repay the $1.6 million. The Billings Gazette reports the tribe was suspended from receiving federal policing grants for three years.

The Bureau of Indian Affairs made its high-risk designation a year ago after finding police and jail officers hadn't undergone proper background checks and jail staff hadn't been trained at the right law enforcement academy. The sanctions included additional fiscal oversight.

Tribal Chairman Floyd Azure says the tribe has resolved all the issues.

Tuesday, April 3rd 2018
Valley County Loses Population From 2016-2017
The U.S Census Bureau is estimating that Valley County lost nearly 100 residents from July of 2016 to July of 2017.

The estimates were released last month by the Census Bureau as the federal agency estimated population of all counties in the Untied States.

Valley County had a estimated population of 7,433 in 2017 compared to 7,537 in 2016.

The 2010 Census had the Valley County population at 7,369.

Here are the estimated populations of surrounding counties:

Phillips County: 4,119
Roosevelt County: 11,098
Garfield County: 1,293
Daniels County: 1,737
Sheridan County: 3,496

Monday, April 2nd 2018
Applications Available For Jeff Jurgens Memorial Scholarships
Applications are currently being accepted for 2018 Jeff Jurgens Memorial Scholars. The annual scholarships are awarded to Valley County students who played high-school varsity basketball or who are pursuing a degree in a medical or health-related field. The scholarships are open to students currently enrolled or who will be attending an institution of higher education anywhere in Montana or in adjoining states.

The Jeff Jurgens Memorial Scholarships are funded by proceeds from the annual Jeff Jurgens Memorial Basketball Tournament, held in Glasgow in mid March. This year marked the 20th annual JJMT, presented by the Scottie Booster Club. The tournament draws nearly 100 youth basketball teams from around eastern Montana and Canada and contributes thousands of dollars to the local economy. As the Booster Club’s largest fundraiser, tournament proceeds also go to support Glasgow Scotties athletics and other extracurricular activities.

Jeff Jurgens Memorial Scholarship applications are available from high school counselors across the county, or they can be requested by emailing Andrew McKean at montanamckean@gmail.com . Deadline for returning completed applications is Saturday, May 5, 2018.
Friday, March 30th 2018
Easter Egg Hunt Postponed
The Glasgow Kiwanis Club Easter Egg Hunt has been postponed until next Saturday, April 7th.

Due to weather conditions expected for Saturday, the Kiwanis Club thought it best to postpone the annual egg hunt.

Wednesday, March 28th 2018
Phillips County Hospital Receives Low-Cost Loan to remodel Nurses Station
HELENA, Mont. – The Montana Facility Finance Authority (MFFA) recently closed on a low-cost direct loan for the Phillips County Hospital in Malta. The $99,070 loan will allow the clinic to remodel its nurses’ station to improve patient privacy and increase work efficiency.

“At Phillips County Hospital we are greatly appreciative of the MFFA partnering with us on financing our nursing station remodel,” Phillips County Hospital CEO Ward VanWichen said. “Without our shared vision of improving our patient care and services along with the funding support, this project most likely would not come to fruition. They are great people to work with and are true partners in improving health care.

The remodel will include new carpeting, a digital phone system, updated furniture, and the installation of network cabling. The clinic, built in the 1970s, has never been substantially renovated. The current nursing station does not provide adequate patient privacy.

“With this remodel, the clinic nurses’ station will be upgraded to ensure confidentiality for the patients,” Montana Facility Finance Authority Executive Director Adam Gill said. “The loan will also help the hospital streamline processes that will shorten patient wait times and improve staff workflows.”
The MFFA Direct Loan Program provides rural nonprofit hospitals and other healthcare providers with access to low-cost capital financing up to $300,000.

Tuesday, March 27th 2018
Hunter Education Classes Offered Across Region 6 for Youth and Adults
Additional Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Hunter Education course dates have been set for many areas across Region 6. All hunter education classes are free of charge. Many classes are being held prior to the May 1 application deadline for moose, sheep and goat, and June 1 for deer B, elk B and antelope. In the next few months, classroom courses (for youth) are being held in:

Havre: starting April 5
Whitewater: starting April 9
Glasgow: starting April 13
Wolf Point: starting April 25
Havre: starting May 3
Bainville: starting May 5

All students must register online at the FWP website. Next, “Find a class or field course” and search for the available class in your area. Detailed instructions on dates, times, and other information will be found on the registration page. Many classes require students to pick up a manual and complete chapter quizzes before class begins.

For youth to be eligible to hunt and be fully certified during the 2018 season, hunters must be 12-years old by January 16, 2019. Students aged 10 and 11 can take a course and hunt as an apprentice, but will not be fully certified until the year they turn 12. Preference will be given to 11 and 12-year olds (or older) if the class becomes full. All registrants for these events must be 10 years old by the first day of class.

An adult online field course will be held in the next month as well:
Glasgow: April 15

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online hunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. Adults looking to complete the online course can find instructions at fwp.mt.gov. The Field Day Qualifier Certificate (indicating completion of the online course) and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.

Hunter Education courses are taught by a group of dedicated volunteers. For information on becoming a Hunter or Bowhunter education instructor, visit the FWP web site at fwp.mt.gov/education/hunter/instructors/ to learn more and apply. If there are any questions, please call the Glasgow FWP office at 228-3700.

Tuesday, March 27th 2018
Bowhunter Education Class Offered in Havre for Youth and Adults
A Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Bowhunter Education course date has been set for the Havre area. There will be a regular youth classroom course starting on April 16, and an adult online “field day” course on April 21.

Archery hunters must have purchased a Montana bow and arrow license prior to hunting during the archery-only season. To purchase a bow and arrow license an individual must meet one of the following requirements:
· show completion of a bowhunter education course
· show proof of purchase of a previous year’s bow and arrow license from Montana or another state

Signed affidavits are no longer acceptable as proof of an bowhunter education.

The youth classroom course will be held at the Hill County Electric Training Room in Havre. All registrants for the classroom course must be 11 years of age by April 16. To hunt during the archery only season, youth need to be at least 12-years old by January 16, 2019.

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online bowhunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. This Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.

The adult field course will be held from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, also at the Hill County Electric Training Room.

Classroom students need to pick up the “Today’s Bowhunter” manual from the FWP office in Havre. Students are to read each chapter and complete all chapter review exercises before the start of class.
To register and learn more about the bowhunter education classes offered, please go to the FWP website at www.fwp.mt.gov and look under the “Education” tab. If there are any questions, please call course coordinator Nick Siebrasse at 406-390-0402.

Tuesday, March 27th 2018
Glasgow School Enrollment Increases
The Glasgow School District enrollment saw an increase in March compared to numbers in February.

The K-12 enrollment increased from 861 to 870 students in the one month period.

The 870 students is up significantly compared to last year when the enrollment was 843 students.

The largest class in the Glasgow school system is the 6th grade class with 78 students while the smallest class is the 2nd grade class with 44 students.

Monday, March 26th 2018
JSEC Awards Local Scholarships
The Glasgow Job Service Employers’ Committee (JSEC) awarded three scholarships to Valley County high school seniors who are continuing their education after graduation. Senior students Cade Anderson (Opheim), Haylee Fauth (Opheim), and Casity Boucher (Hinsdale) received scholarships to use toward college expenses. Ten students competed for the scholarship money. Final awards were based on a panel interview in which students described their plans to meet their educational and occupational goals.

Funding was provided by Valley County Employers who share the JSEC’s desire to improve our future workforce by encouraging you to continue their education, this year employers donated $1,650.00, all of which was distributed to the students.

Each of the students demonstrated high aspirations. Casity and Haylee are pursuing their dreams of teaching and Cade’s plan is to attend school to earn a degree in video game development.

JSEC would like to thank the following businesses that have generously contributed to the scholarship: Fossum Ready Mix, KLTZ, Joe Reyling, First Community Bank, MT Aviation, Prairie Ridge, FMDH, City of Glasgow, Cottonwood Inn, D&G Sports, and Chappel’s Automotive.

The JSEC meets monthly at Prairie Ridge Village to discuss and organize training workshops, scholarships, and address local employer issues. For more information, contact Stacey at 228-2476, Ext. 1. You can also email jsecglasgow@outlook.com .

Monday, March 26th 2018
Job Service Employer's Committee To Host Seminar April 4th
The Job Service Employer's Committee will be hosting a spring seminar on Wednesday April 4, 2018 from 8:30 A.M until 12:30 P.M, at the Cottonwood Inn. Jim Larson with the MT Ag Safety Program will present how to establish a safety plan to protect you and your property from undue liability, preventing accidents before they happen, planting to harvest safety, Livestock production safety; calving; stocker cattle operations, and feedlots, 4-wheeler and side-by-side safety and demonstrations, and Laws that affect your liability and risk; independent contractors, volunteer labor, neighbors, and kids.

A representative from Rocky Mountain Law Partners, P.C., will be discussing Farm and Ranch Planning, specifically on the topics of Estate Planning Concepts and how it should be adapted to fit specific family situations and Business Succession Planning; how will the farm/ranch be passed on to the next generation.

For more information or a registration form, contact Chair Stacey Amundson, 406-228-2476, Ext. 1 or by emailing jsecglasgow@outlook.com.


Friday, March 23rd 2018
BLM to examine bison group's request for more public land in northeastern Montana
The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is asking for the public’s help in determining what it should analyze as it considers proposed changes to several grazing leases.

American Prairie Reserve (APR) controls private properties tied to 18 BLM grazing allotments in Fergus, Petroleum, Phillips, and Valley Counties. They have submitted a proposal asking the BLM to modify their grazing permits. APR is seeking permission to: change the class of livestock from cattle to bison; allow for season-long grazing; fortify existing external boundary fences by replacing the second strand from the top with an electrified wire; and remove interior fences.

The BLM plans to analyze all 18 grazing allotments in one Environmental Assessment (EA) to consolidate efforts across the district.

“We are asking the public to provide input on what they feel needs to be analyzed in the EA,” said BLM North Central Montana District Manager Mark Albers. “The most helpful comments are those that describe specific issues upon which we should focus our analysis, rather than a personal opinion on the relative merits of the proposed changes.”

The BLM will hold four open-house style scoping meetings to provide the public with information about the proposal and the National Environmental Policy Act process.

April 9 - Petroleum County Courthouse Basement, 302 East Main St., Winnett, Mont.

April 10 - Winifred Community Center, 210 Main St., Winifred, Mont.

April 11 - Old Junior High Gym, 505 S 3rd Ave. E., Malta, Mont.

April 12 - Cottonwood Inn, 54250 U.S. 2, Glasgow, Mont.

All scoping meeting will run from 1:30 to 5 p.m. The scoping period runs from April 9 to May 9, 2018. After scoping comments are received and reviewed, a Draft Environmental Assessment will be produced and released to the public for a 30-day review period. During that review period, BLM will return to these same communities and host meetings to gather input from the public.

The BLM is Making America Great through Shared Conservation. The BLM welcomes and values your diverse views. Scoping comments can be emailed to blm_mt_scoping_ncmd@blm.gov or mailed to: APR Scoping Comments, BLM Malta Field Office, 47285 Highway 2, Malta, MT 59538.

Scoping comments may be subject to Freedom of Information Act requests. Do not include in your scoping comments personally identifiable information you do not want to be made public.

Wednesday, March 21st 2018
Flood Forecast Show Flooding Almost Imminent for Milk River at Glasgow
The National Weather Service is projecting that flooding is almost imminent for the Milk River at Glasgow. The latest forecast for Glasgow shows that there is a 98% chance of minor and moderate flooding at Glasgow and a 68% chance of major flooding at Glasgow.

The NWS is projecting that flooding will begin the first week of April and continue through the entire month due the immense amount of snowpack in the Milk River Basin.

Here are the Milk River Flood Levels:

Major Flood Stage: 31
Moderate Flood Stage: 29
Flood Stage: 25
Action Stage: 23

34.08 This matches the level of the record June 2011 flood.

34 Highway 24...Fort Peck Highway will begin to flood a quarter mile south of the Milk River Bridge.

33.75 Highway 42 also known as Fort Peck Highway near Sullivan Park becomes completely submerged. Traffic barriers should be placed by law enforcement to restrict traffic.

33.2 This matches the stage level of the 1952 flood.

33 Fort Peck Highway...Montana 42...begins to flood near Sullivan Park.

32.79 Most roads in the lower Milk River Valley are flooded.

31 Flooding will begin to affect buildings between the Fort Peck Highway and the Milk River east of Glasgow. Sullivan Park will be totally covered by flood waters.

30 Flood waters will begin to cover 6th Avenue South west of the river. Storm drainage valves along Glasgow levee will back-flood into the southside of Glasgow if not closed. Flooding begins on Rahlf Lane off of Highway 24. Water reaches the base of the Sullivan Park sign in Sullivan Park.

29.5 Livestock/feedlots adjacent to Milk River become isolated by flood water. Livestock relocation to higher ground should have started.

28.5 Water begins to flow over Whately Road...which is about 7 miles east of Glasgow.

26 Some flooding will also occur on area farmlands.

25 This is flood stage. Expect some low-land flooding to occur.

Tuesday, March 20th 2018
Montana Kids to ‘Kick Butts’ on March 21
State Leaders Challenged to Create First Tobacco-Free Generation

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Kids in Montana will unite against tobacco use on March 21 as they join thousands of young people nationwide to mark Kick Butts Day. More than 1,000 events are planned across the United States for this annual day of youth activism, sponsored by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. (See below for a list of local events.)

On Kick Butts Day, kids encourage their peers to be tobacco-free, reject tobacco companies’ devious marketing and urge elected officials to help make the next generation tobacco-free.

This year, Kick Butts Day is focusing attention on the progress the U.S. has made in reducing youth smoking and the actions needed to create the first tobacco-free generation. Since 2000, the national smoking rate among high school students has fallen by 71 percent (from 28 percent in 2000 to 8 percent in 2016). However, the fight against tobacco is far from over:
· Tobacco use is still the No. 1 cause of preventable death in the U.S., killing over 480,000 people and costing about $170 billion in health care expenses each year.
· Tobacco companies spend $8.9 billion a year – $1 million every hour – to market tobacco products in the U.S., often in ways that appeal to kids.
· Electronic cigarettes have become the most popular tobacco product used by kids – nationwide, 11.3 percent of high school students use e-cigarettes compared to 8 percent who smoke cigarettes. The latest trend with teens is JUUL, an e-cigarette that looks like a computer flash drive and comes in flavors like mango and fruit medley.

In Montana, tobacco use claims 1,600 lives and costs $440 million in health care bills each year. Currently, 13.1 percent of Montana’s high school students smoke.

On Kick Butts Day, kids and health advocates are calling on elected officials to implement proven strategies that make up a “roadmap to a tobacco-free generation.” These strategies include tobacco tax increases, comprehensive smoke-free laws, raising the tobacco sale age to 21, well-funded tobacco prevention programs and banning the sale of flavored tobacco products.

“On Kick Butts Day, kids are celebrating the progress we’ve made to reduce tobacco use and building momentum to get us across the finish line,” said Matthew L. Myers, President of the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. “Elected leaders in every state can help create the first tobacco-free generation by supporting proven strategies to prevent youth tobacco use.”

On Kick Butts Day, kids join in creative events ranging from classroom activities to educate their peers about the harmful ingredients in cigarettes to rallies at state capitols.

In Montana, activities include:

Students at Glasgow Middle and High Schools will commit to be tobacco-free and to encourage peers and loved ones to quit smoking by constructing and signing a pledge wall. Time: 12 PM. Locations: Glasgow Middle School, 11 Lasar Drive, Glasgow; and Glasgow High School, 1 Scotty Pride Drive, Glasgow. Contact: Brittany Archambeault (406) 228-6261.

Students at Cut Bank Middle School will display cups in a fence in front of H.C. Davis Elementary School to show the community the deadly consequences of tobacco use. Time: 11 AM. Location: 15 2nd Avenue S.E., Cut Bank. Contact: Holley DeWitt (406) 873-5886.

Students from Terry Middle and High School, in collaboration with the Dawson County Health Department, will display cups in a fence in front of the school to share facts about the deadly consequences of tobacco use and the deceptive tactics used by the tobacco industry to market their products. Time: 11 AM. Location: 215 Park Street, Terry. Contact: Lindsay Sadorf (406) 939-3529.

On March 22, students at Roosevelt Middle School in Red Lodge will participate in Kick Ball for Kick Butts Day and pledge to be tobacco-free. Time: 8:25 AM. Location: 311 South Oakes Street, Red Lodge. Contact: Jean Atherly (406) 860-3825.

All events will take place March 21 unless otherwise indicated. For a full list of Kick Butts Day activities in Montana, visit www.tobaccofreekids.org/map. Additional information about tobacco, including state-by-state statistics, can be found at www.tobaccofreekids.org.

Tuesday, March 13th 2018
Several Contested Races In Valley County For 2018
Valley County Election Administrator Lynne Nyquist has told Kltz/Mix-93 that there will be several contested races for political season 2018. The filing deadline was Monday and there were 2 late filings. Joe Horn filed to fun for Sheriff and Christine Gamas filed for Justice of the Peace.

The race for Valley County Commissioner has 7 candidates vying for the job. The candidates include Mary Armstrong, Michael Carney, Arlie Gordon, Jim Uphaus, Todd Young, Gilbert Mogan and Rene Clampitt.

Here are the other filings for elected positions in Valley County:

Treasurer: Brenda Anderson

Valley County Attorney: Dylan Jensen

Valley County Sheriff/Coroner: Lucas Strommen and Joe Horn

Valley County Clerk and Recorder: Taryn Stebleton and Ruth Dowell

Valley County Justice of the Peace: Christy Hillman and Christine Gamas

Monday, March 12th 2018
Tyrel Brandt and Mike Kaiser file for Glasgow School Board
Tyrel Brandt and Mike Kaiser have filed as candidates for the Glasgow School Board. The 2 candidates join Sarah Swanson and Ryan Fast running for the school board.

The terms available are both 3-year terms.

The election is set for May 8th and the deadline for filing for the school board is March 29th.

Monday, March 12th 2018
Valley County Unemployment Rate at 4.3%
MONTANA – Montana’s unemployment rate remained level at 4.1% for the month of January. The U.S. unemployment rate also remained at 4.1%.

“Montana’s economy remains strong and we're working directly with businesses large and small to get more folks into good paying jobs,” said Governor Bullock. “Communities continue to attract new and innovative business to Montana because of our friendly business climate and unparalleled quality of life, all while schools are getting students ready to take on the jobs of today and the future."

Both payroll and total employment levels remained steady over the last month, with small gains in construction offset by small losses in other industries. In addition, the Department of Labor & Industry has released revised and updated statewide unemployment and employment growth numbers for the previous five years. Unemployment rate and employment estimates are revised each year in February in a process called benchmarking, which typically results in more accurate estimates and a smoother data series. Updated estimates suggest employment growth of 0.9% for 2017, or roughly 4,300 jobs. This employment growth rate is slightly slower than in previous years, but paired with continued output growth, simply reinforces that Montana businesses are struggling to find sufficient workers to support growth.

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) rose by 0.5% in January, with broad-based price increases across all goods. Over the last 12 months, the CPI-U has increased by 2.1%, staying within the Federal Reserve’s target for rates. The index for all items less food and energy, also called core inflation, increased 0.3% in January, with a change of 1.8% over the last year.
###
** Unemployment figures are seasonally-adjusted. Seasonally-adjusted numbers remove the effects of events that follow a more or less regular month-to-month pattern each year. These adjustments make nonseasonal patterns easier to identify. The margin of error for the unemployment rate is plus or minus 0.5 percentage points at the 90 percent confidence level. All questions relating to the calculation of unemployment rates should be directed to the Montana Department of Labor and Industry’s Research and Analysis Bureau at 1-800-541-3904.

The next Labor Situation Report for the month of February 2018 will be released on Friday, March 23, 2018. State unemployment rate estimates are not released during the month of February due to the re-estimation and benchmarking process, which results in both January and February rates being issued in March.

****** COUNTY UNEMPLOYMENT RATES ******
The unemployment rate and ranking for each of Montana’s 56 counties is provided below for your convenience. County unemployment rates and employment levels are not seasonally adjusted and should be compared to the unadjusted statewide unemployment rate of 5.1%.

Unemployment Rate Employment
Rank County Current Unemployment
Rate Change over Year Current Employment Job Change from Last Year
1 McCone 2.2 0.3 972 (27)
2 Liberty 2.7 1.1 934 12
3 Daniels 2.9 0.1 871 (12)
3 Fallon 2.9 0.8 1,632 (32)
5 Dawson 3.2 0.4 4,500 (56)
5 Gallatin 3.2 -0.1 61,955 1,666
7 Garfield 3.3 0.5 742 14
8 Sheridan 3.4 0.5 1,758 (58)
8 Toole 3.4 0 1,987 (80)
10 Powder River 3.6 -0.1 960 3
10 Richland 3.6 0.6 5,753 (53)
12 Wibaux 3.7 -0.8 438 (34)
13 Carter 3.8 -0.9 657 (6)
13 Chouteau 3.8 0.3 2,365 31
15 Hill 4.0 0.5 7,570 87
16 Custer 4.1 0.2 5,818 (84)
16 Treasure 4.1 0.3 324 1
18 Beaverhead 4.2 -0.3 4,818 16
19 Valley 4.3 0.3 3,875 (41)
20 Yellowstone 4.4 -0.1 76,790 (691)
21 Lewis and Clark 4.6 -0.2 33,156 (451)
21 Sweet Grass 4.6 -0.7 1,705 32
23 Cascade 4.8 -0.1 36,070 18
23 Missoula 4.8 -0.3 58,247 (602)
23 Stillwater 4.8 0.3 4,580 54
26 Carbon 4.9 -0.2 5,074 (47)
26 Teton 4.9 0.5 2,573 (78)
28 Prairie 5.0 -0.6 460 (19)
29 Jefferson 5.1 0.2 5,267 (70)
29 Pondera 5.1 -0.2 2,566 (56)
31 Madison 5.3 -0.8 4,510 (59)
31 Roosevelt 5.3 0.2 4,342 26
31 Silver Bow 5.3 -0.2 16,154 17
34 Broadwater 5.4 1.1 2,404 48
34 Deer Lodge 5.4 -1 4,803 47
34 Meagher 5.4 -0.2 901 34
37 Judith Basin 5.5 -0.5 866 14
37 Park 5.5 -0.1 7,932 245
39 Blaine 5.8 -0.3 2,200 22
40 Lake 5.9 -0.1 12,414 276
40 Powell 5.9 0 2,611 (66)
42 Fergus 6.1 0 5,376 (38)
42 Musselshell 6.1 -0.3 2,170 42
42 Wheatland 6.1 -0.7 725 (16)
45 Ravalli 6.2 0.1 18,497 373
46 Golden Valley 6.4 0 350 (3)
47 Flathead 6.8 0.1 43,382 1,055
47 Petroleum 6.8 0.1 260 2
49 Rosebud 6.9 -0.5 3,663 (42)
50 Phillips 7.4 -0.8 1,779 12
51 Granite 8.5 -0.4 1,531 54
52 Glacier 9.8 -0.2 4,942 (40)
53 Sanders 10.2 -0.6 4,330 99
54 Lincoln 11.0 0.1 6,906 61
55 Mineral 11.7 -2.2 1,427 (52)
56 Big Horn 11.8 0.3 4,754 (171)

Thursday, March 8th 2018
Mountain Snow Pack Record Breaking In Some Locations
BOZEMAN, Mont., March, 7, 2018 – Snowfall in some locations of Montana has been record-breaking during February, resulting in snowpack totals for March 1st that are well above normal for most river basins, according to snow survey data collected by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Twenty-five SNOTEL (SNOwpack TELemetry) stations and manual measurement locations set new records for February totals, and 21 measurements at other locations were the second highest on record.

“Abundant mountain, valley and plains snowfall this winter has Montana under a blanket of snow at the beginning of March,” said Lucas Zukiewicz, NRCS water supply specialist for Montana. “While this is great news for long-term water supply, it’s been hard on a lot of families and businesses in the plains.”

Snowpack totals are above normal in all major river basins of the state of Montana for March 1, and some measurement locations are setting records for this date. Fifteen snowpack measurement locations have set a new record for March 1, and 12 are the second highest on record. Most of these records are being set in the headwaters of the Upper Clark Fork, mountains of the Missouri Mainstem around Helena and in the headwaters of the Upper Yellowstone and Clark’s Fork of the Yellowstone River basins. While not record-setting, most other river basins have seen consistent and above normal moisture this winter due to the favorable La Nina weather patterns this winter. Many snowpack measurement locations have already reached the normal “peak,” or maximum amount of snow water contained in the snowpack, on March 1st. Zukiewicz said only one area seems to be left out of this year, the Centennial range which serves as the headwaters for the Red Rock River in southwestern Montana. It has a snowpack that remains below normal for this date.

“As we approach spring, water users across the state start to plan for the coming growing season, water supply and allocations from spring runoff of the mountain snowpack,” Zukiewicz said. “This year looks to deliver above average flows in the rivers in most locations due to the deep mountain snowpack.”

On March 1, the NRCS Montana Snow Survey began to issue forecasts for the spring and summer runoff with many locations forecasted to be above to well above average. Some forecasted volumes for rivers in south-central Montana for the April 1 through July 31 period are approaching records. “The median forecast for the Clark’s Fork at Belfry, Mont., is above the record for that location,” Zukiewicz said. “There’s going to be a lot of water coming out of the Beartooth Range this spring and summer.”

While spring is always critical to the timing and volume of water supply, Zukiewicz said he will keep a close eye on the week-to-week weather patterns over the next few months. Climatologically, the months of March through May are some of the most significant months with regards to precipitation for river basins east of the Divide, and many basins already have an above-normal snowpack. Any continued snowfall will build on the above normal snowpack and will further increase the amount of water available for runoff.

“At this point, we have pretty close to assured adequate water supply in many areas due to heavy early season snowfall,” Zukiewicz said. “As much as it pains me to say it, a normal month or two would be the best case scenario from here on out.” The NRCS Montana Snow Survey will issue the next snowpack report and updated water supply forecasts for the state on April 1, 2018. “By then we should have a good idea if this pattern is going to break or keep going.”

Individual point forecasts for streams and rivers can be found in the monthly NRCS Water Supply Outlook Report and should be consulted as conditions vary from basin to basin, and even within the basins themselves.

Monthly Water Supply Outlook Reports can be found at the website below after the 5th business day of the month: http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/mt/snow/waterproducts/basin/

March 1, 2018, Snow Water Equivalent
River Basin % of Normal % Last Year
Columbia 138 142
Kootenai, Montana 122 126
Flathead, Montana 137 141
Upper Clark Fork 159 167
Bitterroot 133 134
Lower Clark Fork 123 126
Missouri 136 136
Jefferson 138 134
Madison 122 108
Gallatin 136 139
Headwaters Mainstem 175 175
Smith-Judith-Musselshell 137 178
Sun-Teton-Marias 153 137
St. Mary-Milk 127 134
Yellowstone River Basin 145 104
Upper Yellowstone 164 130
Lower Yellowstone 128 85
West of the Divide 138 142
East of the Divide 139 117
Montana State-Wide 140 139

March 1, 2018, Precipitation
River Basin Monthly % of Average Water Year % of Average Water Year % of Last Year
Columbia 184 128 107
Kootenai, Montana 150 117 89
Flathead, Montana 185 132 105
Upper Clark Fork 203 135 125
Bitterroot 191 122 116
Lower Clark Fork 175 123 100
Missouri 179 121 92
Jefferson 158 109 90
Madison 143 112 78
Gallatin 154 126 98
Headwaters Mainstem 239 143 122
Smith-Judith-Musselshell 198 123 112
Sun-Teton-Marias 267 147 113
St. Mary-Milk 211 133 87
Yellowstone River Basin 192 128 88
Upper Yellowstone 199 145 99
Lower Yellowstone 181 113 76
West of the Divide 184 128 107
East of the Divide 186 125 91
Montana State-Wide 192 129 101

Wednesday, March 7th 2018
2 Candidates File For Glasgow School Board
Ryan Fast and Sarah Swanson have filed as candidates for the Glasgow School Board. The 2 candidates have filed for the two seats that are currently held by Allison Molvig and Mike Kaiser.

The terms available are both 3-year terms.

The election is set for May 8th and the deadline for filing for the school board is March 29th.

Monday, February 26th 2018
Hunter Education Classes Offered Across Region 6 for Youth and Adults
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Hunter Education course dates have been set for many areas across Region 6. All hunter education classes are free of charge. Many classes are being held prior to the March 15 application deadline for special permits for deer and elk. Future application deadlines include May 1 for moose, sheep and goat, and June 1 for deer B, elk B and antelope. In the next month, classroom courses (for youth) are being held in:
Bainville: starting March 3 (currently full)
Hinsdale: starting March 5
Glasgow: starting March 8
Saco: starting March 12
Scobey: starting March 12
Havre: starting April 5

All students must register online at the FWP website: fwp.mt.gov; click on the education tab, then click “hunter education programs”. Next, “Find a class or field course” and search for the available class in your area. Detailed instructions on dates, times, and other information will be found on the registration page. Many classes require students to pick up a manual and complete chapter quizzes before class begins.

For youth to be eligible to hunt and be fully certified during the 2018 season, hunters must be 12-years old by January 16, 2019. Students aged 10 and 11 can take a course and hunt as an apprentice, but will not be fully certified until the year they turn 12. Preference will be given to 11 and 12-year olds (or older) if the class becomes full. All registrants for these events must be 10 years old by the first day of class.

Adult online field course will be held in the next month as well:
Great falls: March 3 (currently full)

Glasgow: March 11
For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online hunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. Adults looking to complete the online course can find instructions at fwp.mt.gov. The Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.
If there are any questions, please call the Glasgow FWP office at 228-3700.

Wednesday, February 21st 2018
Mary Armstrong Files for Valley County Commissioner
Valley County Election Administrator Lynne Nyquist has told Kltz/Mix-93 that Mary Armstrong has become the 7th candidate to file for Valley County Commissioner.

He joins the other candidates who have already filed: Michael Carney, Arlie Gordon, Jim Uphaus, Todd Young, Gilbert Mogan and Rene Clampitt.

There will be both a primary and general election for the position.

Here are the other filings for elected positions in Valley County:

Treasurer: Brenda Anderson

Valley County Attorney: Dylan Jensen

Valley County Sheriff/Coroner: Lucas Strommen

Valley County Clerk and Recorder: Taryn Stebleton and Ruth Dowell

Valley County Justice of the Peace: Christina Hillman

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