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Latest Local News
Tuesday, March 28th 2017
3 Arrested On Drug Charges In St. Marie
Jason Schappaugh, Jeff Thomas and Marrissa Thomas were all arrested by the VCSO on Friday and charged with drug offenses.

According to Sheriff Vern Buerkle, the VCSO had obtained a search warrant for a residence in St. Marie and upon executing the warrant the 3 individuals were arrested.

The charges against the 3 included criminal possession of dangerous drugs, criminal endangerment and possession of drug paraphernalia.

Sheriff Buerkle told Kltz/Mix-93 that the 3 were allegedly in possession of marijuana and hashish.

All 3 were incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center as of Monday.

The investigation was conducted by the Valley County Sheriff's Office.

Monday, March 27th 2017
3 Candidates For Glasgow School Board
There are 3 candidate filings for Trustee positions on the Glasgow School Board. The 3 candidates will be on the ballot for the May school election with the top 2 being voted on to the board for 3-year terms.

Tyrel Brandt
John Daggett-incumbent
Suzanne Billingsley-incumbent

Friday, March 24th 2017
Trump administration approves Keystone XL pipeline
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration has issued a presidential permit to pipeline builder TransCanada to build the Keystone XL pipeline.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer tweeted that President Donald Trump would discuss the pipeline later Friday morning.

The State Department says that it determined that building Keystone serves the U.S. national interest. That's the opposite conclusion to the one the State Department reached during the Obama administration.

The State Department says it considered foreign policy and energy security in making the determination.

The permit was signed by Tom Shannon, a career diplomat serving as undersecretary of state for political affairs. That's because Secretary of State Rex Tillerson recused himself due to his previous work running Exxon Mobil.

Keystone will carry tar sands oil from Canada to refineries on the Texas Gulf Coast.

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says "it's a great day for American jobs" after his administration issued a permit to build the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline.

The decision marks a reversal from the Obama administration and clears the way for the $8 billion project to be completed.

The president says the decision ushers in a "new era" of American energy policy and will reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil.

The decision caps a years-long fight between environmental groups and energy industry advocates over the pipeline's fate.

It's one of several steps the administration is expected to take in the coming weeks to prioritize economic development over environmental concerns.


(Copyright 2017 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

Thursday, March 23rd 2017
Montana Legislature To Consider Legislation Which Would Allow Montana Counties To Conduct Mail-Ballot Election For Special Congressional Election
HELENA -- Time is running out for the Legislature to decide whether to allow counties in Montana to opt for mail-in ballots for the upcoming special congressional election.

Senate Bill 305, which would allow for a mail election, passed the Senate 37-13 in February and gets its first hearing in the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

Sen. Steve Fitzpatrick, R-Great Falls, said 46 of the state’s 56 counties have adopted a resolution to support the mail-in ballot election proposed by the bill, but it still needs to be signed by Gov. Steve Bullock by April 10 in order to take effect.

Bullock announced early this month that the special election to fill now Interior Secretary Ryan ZInke’s vacated congressional seat will be held May 25. The bill indicates that the mail ballot plan must be submitted to the Secretary of State at least 45 days prior to the election.

Fitzpatrick is carrying the bill and said mail-in ballots could save counties up to $500,000. During debate on the bill last month he also said the percentage of people voting by mail ballot has skyrocketed.

“Most people vote by mail, and we don’t have problems with fraud or any of these other things that people think they’re going to get from mail-in ballots,” Fitzpatrick said.

House Speaker Austin Knudsen, R-Culbertson, had been a vocal opponent to the bill prior to the bill’s introduction. A spokesperson for Knudsen said the speaker has concerns about the process eliminating choice for some voters and that he questions the security of the ballots.

Valley County officials estimate that having a mail-ballot election would save Valley County an estimated $15,000. The Valley County Commissioners have come out in support of the legislation.

The bill got national attention when Rep. Jeff Essmann, R-Billings, wrote in an email to party leaders that the bill could hurt a Republican’s chances in the election.

Freddy Monares is a reporter with the UM Legislative News Service, a partnership of the University of Montana School of Journalism, the Montana Broadcasters Association and the Greater Montana Foundation.

Wednesday, March 22nd 2017
Stan Ozark Interviews Glasgow Superintendent Of Schools Bob Connors
Stan Ozark visited with Glasgow Superintendent of Schools Bob Connors on Tuesday. They talked about an upcoming levy and trustee election among other things.

Here is the full interview:

Bob Connors.

Wednesday, March 22nd 2017
Senator Tester Announces Legislation To Temporarily Ban Importation Of Brazilian Beef
U.S. Senate) - U.S. Senator Jon Tester today announced legislation to temporarily ban the importation of Brazilian beef to protect American consumers from consuming rotten meat.

Following news that Brazilian meatpackers have been exporting rotten beef and trying to cover it up with cancer-causing acid products, Tester’s bill will place a 120-day ban on Brazilian beef imports. A 120-day ban will provide the U.S. Department of Agriculture time to comprehensively investigate food safety threats and to determine which Brazilian beef sources put American consumers are risk.

“We must take decisive action to ensure no family in Montana or anywhere else in this country is exposed to the danger of deceptive Brazilian beef processors,” said Tester, who butchers his own beef on his farm near Big Sandy, Mont. “Montana producers raise the best beef in the world and are held to the highest safety standards. We cannot allow harmful food to come into our markets and endanger our families.”

“I applaud Senator Tester’s decisive action,” said Errol Rice Executive Vice President of the Montana Stockgrowers Association. “The safety and integrity of our beef products is important for ranchers and consumers and we cannot have this dangerous product flooding our markets.”

In August of last year, Tester criticized the USDA’s decision to allow Brazilian beef imports to flood America’s markets. He expressed fears about the safety of Brazil’s product.

In 2015, Tester successfully blocked the importation of Brazilian beef from regions where foot-and-mouth disease was prevalent.

Wednesday, March 22nd 2017
Plea Agreements Reached In Federal Theft Case
Two women have reached plea agreements with the federal government on charges of theft from a program receiving federal funding and wire fraud.

Brady Funk and Toni Plummer-Alvernaz were both employees of the Women’s Resource Center in Glasgow and the U.S. Attorney’s Office filed the federal charges against each woman.

The plea agreement reached by Brady Funk has her pleading guilty to the charge of Theft from a Program Receiving Federal Funding. Funk will need to pay back $30,000 in restitution and the federal government will not recommend any detention in the case.

Plummer-Alvernaz will plead guilty to the charge of theft from a Program Receiving Federal Funding. The federal government stated that they expect the amount of loss to the Resource Center and Women’s Coalition to exceed $200,000. No amount was given for restitution by Plummer-Alvernaz. Court documents state that the parties will address the total amount of fraud loss at sentencing. Court documents do not state that the federal government will seek detention for Plummer-Alvernaz because of the guilty plea.

Plummer-Alvernaz was the executive director of both organizations. Funk was the administrative assistant for the coalition and the administrative advocate for the resource center.
Both programs receive more than $10,000 in annual federal grants. During the period of indictments, from about December 2011 until December 2015, the programs received in excess of $1.6 million.

The Montana Native Women’s Coalition’s mission is to improve urban, rural and Native American community responses to victims of domestic and sexual violence.

The Women’s Resource Center offers educational seminars to the public on various issues, including health, parenting, career development and violence prevention.

Tuesday, March 21st 2017
Notice For South Side Property Owners
To all the property owners between 8th Street South & 12 Street South on the Northside of 2nd Avenue South, the garbage cans will be moved from the alleys out to the end streets temporarily for alley work.

We are doing this to get the garbage trucks off of running the alley while it dries, then a contractor working for MDU will remove the mud from the alley and re-gravel the alley. Once that is complete, and the alley is stable, the garbage cans will be moved back into the alley.

We apologize for the temporary inconvenience, but this will improve the alley surface and make them more driveable and useable.

Monday, March 20th 2017
State House Passes Budget Bill On Party Line Vote
HELENA -- The state budget bill that doles out money to agencies passed out of the Montana House of Representatives Friday on a 58-to-40 vote.

House Bill 2, made up of more than $10 billion dollars to be spent over two years, has been the most contentious bill in the Legislative session thus far.

Democrats offered up 25 amendments during a debate Thursday, all of which were shot down mostly on party lines.

Republican Rep. Nancy Ballance is the sponsor of the bill.

“On your desk is a packet of amendments totaling over $200 million in additional spending in no priority order that I can see, that will completely blow up this budget,” Ballance said Thursday.

Democratic Rep. Bryce Bennett opposes the bill.

“It’s a bad bill for working people, working families. It’s a bad bill for people who are struggling, and it’s a bad bill for Montana,” Bennett said.

The bill now moves to the Senate for consideration.

Freddy Monares is a reporter with the UM Legislative News Service, a partnership of the University of Montana School of Journalism, the Montana Broadcasters Association and the Greater Montana Foundation.

Thursday, March 16th 2017
Legislation would legalize blackjack in Montana, tax tables
HELENA -- Rep. Wylie Galt, R-Martinsdale, said generating revenue for the state can be as simple as counting to 21, meaning, playing blackjack.

House Bill 578 would legalize the card game, for both tabletop and video play.

The bill also allocates a $500 tax on each blackjack table to the state’s Department of Justice and a state special revenue account -- $100 going to the DOJ, and $400 to the account.

After the first year, the bill divvies up money in that special revenue account, giving 42 percent to Health and Human Services, 28 percent to the Office of Public Instruction, 14 percent to the sheriff’s retirement system and 14 percent to the Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education. This money is to be used on programs such as vocational, suicide prevention and gambling addiction.

There were no supporters at the House Taxation Committee’s first hearing of testimony on the bill Wednesday.

Angela Nunn, Administrator for the Department of Justice’s Gambling Control Division, opposed the bill and said if it were enacted, the estimated revenue would not be sufficient to regulate the activity.

“That means that the gambling state special revenue fund or some other funding source that they come up with would have to make up the difference in order for us to adequately perform our statutorily obligated duties,” Nunn said.

She said the department would need additional employees in order to be able to monitor and handle disputes in the state. Nunn added that facilities with blackjack tables would also incur more overhead costs to monitor the tables.

“The amount of effort needed to regulate this correctly makes it, from a practical sense, very difficult to implement by October 1 of 2018,” Nunn said.

Jim Johnson, president of the Montana Tavern Association, also opposed the bill. Johnson is a liquor license holder and said he is not interested in having blackjack tables in his bar.

“We had a meeting yesterday with our local Carbon Stillwater Tavern Association of nine bar owners, none of whom are interested in having blackjack in their establishment,” Johnson said.

Speaker Austin Knudsen, R-Culbertson, is co-sponsoring the bill and released a statement via email after the hearing.

“This is a Montana-made solution, giving establishments and individuals the option of Blackjack to poker games they already play, and will help our state fill needed gaps in revenue,” Knudsen wrote in the statement.

Freddy Monares is a reporter with the UM Legislative News Service, a partnership of the University of Montana School of Journalism, the Montana Broadcasters Association and the Greater Montana Foundation.

Thursday, March 16th 2017
Watch Out for Wildlife on the Roads
FWP would like to remind folks to watch for deer (and other animals) on the road, especially during the early morning and early evening hours when both visibility is difficult and animals are sometimes more active. With the recent hour time change, many folks who are commuting are now an hour “forward” and may see more activity.

As our deer numbers are continuing to make a comeback across the region, more and more animal-vehicle accidents are bound to occur. In addition, the spring “fawning” season is just around the corner, and deer are often moving from place to place.

Please use the following advice when driving on MT highways and roads, taken from Geico.com:

Preventive Techniques
The two most important ways to avoid a deer-vehicle collision are: slow down and SLOW DOWN. If you are driving through an area known for high deer populations, slow down and observe the speed limit. The more conservative you are with your speed, the more time you will have to brake if an animal darts into your path.

Always wear a seat belt. The most severe injuries in deer-vehicle collisions usually result from failure to use a seat belt.

Watch for the shine of eyes along the roadside and immediately begin to slow.
Use your high beams whenever the road is free of oncoming traffic. This will increase your visibility and give you more time to react.

Pay close attention to caution signs indicating deer or other large animals. These signs are specifically placed in high-traffic areas where road crossings are frequent.
Whenever possible, try not to drive at dawn and dusk, when visibility is most difficult.
Encountering a Deer
Never swerve to avoid a deer in the road. Swerving can confuse the deer on where to run. Swerving can also cause a head-on collision with oncoming vehicles, take you off the roadway into a tree or a ditch, and greatly increase the chances of serious injuries.
If you do collide with a deer (or large animal), try to let off the brakes at the moment of impact.
Braking through the impact can cause the hood of your vehicle to dip down, which can propel the animal through the windshield.

Call emergency services if injuries are involved, or the local police/highway patrol if no one is injured, but damage has been caused to your property or someone else’s.

Salvage permit

If you or someone else has unfortunately struck a deer, there is the option to salvage it with a permit. The 2013 MT Legislature passed a bill that allows for the salvage of deer, elk, moose, and antelope killed as a result of a collision with a motor vehicle.

Some important information on the salvage permit:

Permits are available at no cost online through the fwp.gov web page.

To possess salvaged wildlife a person must obtain a salvage permit. A person has 24 hours to apply for and get a salvage permit.

A person may pick up an animal that he/she did not hit. The process is the same and he/she must obtain a salvage permit through this web page.

Anyone who salvages a road-killed deer, elk, moose, or antelope will be required to remove the entire animal from where it is found. Parts or viscera cannot be left at the site. To do so is a violation of state law and would encourage other wildlife to scavenge in a place that would put them at risk of also being hit.

Wednesday, March 15th 2017
BLM Resource Advisory Council to meet in Glasgow March 29
(GLASGOW, Mont.) – The Bureau of Land Management Central Montana Resource Advisory Council will meet March 29-30, in the Cottonwood Inn & Suites, 54250 US-2, Glasgow, Montana.

The purpose of the RAC is to advise the Secretary of Interior, through the BLM, on a variety of issues associated with public land management. The 15-member RAC includes individuals who have expertise or education in the planning and management of public lands and resources.

The meeting is open to the public. Public comment periods are scheduled for 12:30-1 p.m. March 29, and 10:30-11 a.m. March 30. Interested parties may make oral statements before the council or file written statements for the council to consider. Depending on the number of people who wish to make comments, a per-person time limit may be established.

During the meetings the council is scheduled to participate in, discuss and act upon a number of BLM related topics and activities. The meeting will include presentations on current resource management issues, including: an update on the Environmental Assessment for the American Prairie Reserve’s Bison conversion proposal; Travel Management Planning; and the definitions and history of Wilderness Areas, Wilderness Study Areas and Lands with Wilderness Characteristics. There will also be a roundtable discussion among council members and the BLM and a District Manager’s update.

For more information, see the meeting agenda here.
Wednesday, March 15th 2017
Valley County Unemployment Rate At 4.1%
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Montana's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate fell one-tenth of a percentage point to 3.9 percent in January, the lowest rate in nearly a decade.

Labor Commissioner Pam Bucy says Montana added 2,700 payroll jobs in January, but with the loss of self-employed and agricultural jobs, the state lost 536 jobs. The number of private jobs increased by 3,100 but the number of public sector jobs fell by 400.

Montana's unemployment rate was last at 3.9 percent in August 2007. It was as low as 2.9 percent in February 2007, before the recession.

The national unemployment rate increased by 0.1 percentage point to 4.8 percent in January.

Montana's February unemployment rate will be released on March 24.

A final analysis of 2016 numbers estimated Montana gained 6,500 jobs last year.

Unemployment in Valley County was at 4.1% in January. Total employment was 4391 with unemployment at 181. The unemployment rate in December of 2016 was 3.6% and the rate in January of 2016 was 4.2%

Wednesday, March 15th 2017
Glasgow Ranked One Of Montana's Safest Cities
Based on the most recent FBI Crime Report, Montana’s statewide crime rate increased slightly from 2014 to 2015, but several cities on our list—including East Helena, Dillon, and Glasgow—lowered their crime rates over this period.

Taking a closer look at the FBI data, we learned that the occurrence of violent crime was especially low among Montana’s ten safest cities. These cities reported fewer than two violent crimes per 1,000 people, whereas nearly four violent crimes were reported for every 1,000 people nationally. While even one crime is too many, SafeWise is impressed that the state’s ten safest cities experienced a total of just eighty-seven violent crimes. In addition, 50% of the cities on our list cited zero incidents of murder, rape, or robbery.

Miles City, by far the largest of the state’s safest cities, reported only twelve violent crimes. In an interview with SafeWise, Miles City’s chief of police, Doug Colombik, explained that he thinks the city’s violent crime rate is exceptionally low because the “officers engage with the community on several levels, starting in the schools—this fosters mutual respect and trust generation after generation—and that goes a long way toward fighting crime.” He added, “we also benefit from the fact that our citizens look out for one another, take pride in their community, and alert us to potential problems right away.”

Residents of the top-ten safest cities in Montana do a stellar job of keeping violent crime under control, and they show a similar commitment to keeping property safe. Altogether, the cities on our list reported a mere sixty burglaries, with seven cities reporting fewer than ten burglaries, and two cities—Colstrip and East Helena—reporting no break-ins at all.

From the Rocky Mountains to the Great Plains, the safest cities in Big Sky Country are spread across the state. Find out more about the cities that made our list, then review our helpful Montana Safety Directory. In addition to crime prevention tips and other safety and security information, you’ll find a color-coded map highlighting the most and least burglarized counties in the state.

How We Chose the Safest Cities in Montana

To identify the safest cities in Montana, we reviewed the most recent FBI Crime Report statistics from 2015, along with population data. We eliminated all cities with fewer than 2,000 residents as well as any cities that failed to submit a complete crime report to the FBI.

http://www.safewise.com/blog/safest-cities-montana/


From there, we evaluated the remaining cities. We narrowed it down based on the number of reported violent crimes (aggravated assault, murder, rape, and robbery) and property crimes (burglary, arson, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft) in each city. To further level the playing field, we calculated the likelihood of these crimes occurring out of 1,000 people in each city.

1. Colstrip

Previous rank: 1

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 0.43
Property Crimes per 1,000: 5.56

2. East Helena ?

Previous rank: 3

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 0.97
Property Crimes per 1,000: 5.31

3. Dillon ?

Previous rank: 4

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 1.41
Property Crimes per 1,000: 5.42

4. Conrad ?

Previous rank: 11

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 2.30
Property Crimes per 1,000: 11.50

5. Glasgow ?

Previous rank: 8

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 1.17
Property Crimes per 1,000: 16.11

6. Columbus

Previous rank: 6

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 0.99
Property Crimes per 1,000: 16.33

7. Sidney ?

Previous rank: 5

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 5.43
Property Crimes per 1,000: 15.40

8. Miles City ?

Previous rank: 12

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 1.36
Property Crimes per 1,000: 23.16

9. Laurel ?

Previous rank: 10

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 1.86
Property Crimes per 1,000: 24.18

10. Red Lodge ?

Previous rank: 9

Violent Crimes per 1,000: 1.79
Property Crimes per 1,000: 24.59

Wednesday, March 15th 2017
Legislation would make it against the law to ban traditional regalia at public events
HELENA -- Native American communities across Montana are asking the Legislature to make it unlawful to ban traditional regalia, specifically beaded caps, during graduation ceremonies.

Senate Bill 319 would allow items with cultural significance to be worn at public events. The bill specifies those events to include public meetings, awards ceremonies and high school or college graduation ceremony.

The bill was pulled from a Senate committee by a blast motion and passed the Senate on a 38-12 vote in February. The House State Administration Committee heard testimony on the bill Tuesday.

Clint Valandra supported the bill. He works in Indian education in Billings and said he sees the struggles Indian families go through to make sure their children graduate from high school.

“When they want to bead their caps at Skyview and West. I tell them they can’t,” Valandra said. “They’re very upset. They don’t know why. ‘Who’s it going to hurt?’ they ask. And I tell them it’s against policy.”

Valandra said he wants to be able to tell those parents to go ahead and show their gratitude during those ceremonies, but a change in policy needs to happen.

“That four years in high school that student and that family generates, it goes through all of them, the whole family members back at the reservation, that that cap was taken away,” Valandra said. “They don’t remember all the days of studying and coming to school.”

High school senior Georgeline Morsette, who said her sister was not allowed in 2014 to bead her cap for graduation either, agreed with Valandra that change needs to happen.

“Beaded graduation caps aren’t merely for decoration or to look pretty, but there is great traditional importance to the beaded caps,” Morsette said.

Cindy Swank, who wore a yellow badge in the shape of Montana that said taxpayer underneath her name, was the only opponent of the bill.

“The way it’s written, it’s a pretty broad bill and it kind of gave me the impression when I first read it that anything could go,” Swank said.

Swank said she mostly supports the bill, but was worried that it was too vague in its current form. She said adding language to say, “As long as the traditional regalia does not violate any local, state, or federal public safety or decency laws,” would satisfy her.

Democratic Sen. Jen Gross is the sponsor of the bill and said the scope of the bill was deliberate.

“We don’t feel that wearing an object of cultural significance should be limited to just a high school graduation,” Gross said.

Freddy Monares is a reporter with the UM Legislative News Service, a partnership of the University of Montana School of Journalism, the Montana Broadcasters Association and the Greater Montana Foundation.

Sunday, March 12th 2017
FWP Holding Seasonal Job Interviews Monday
Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks is looking for seasonal employees to run
Aquatic Invasive Species Inspection and Decontamination Stations around the state.

The Glasgow Interviews will be held today, March 13, from 9a.m. to 3 p.m. at FWP Headquarters at 1 Airport Road in Glasgow

Successful applicants receive competitive pay, $13.02/hr., potential benefits, and the opportunity to help protect Montana’s precious water resources.

Qualifications include:

Must be 18 years old or older.
Must possesses a valid driver’s license and clean driving record.
Must have excellent customer service skills and enjoy working with the public.
Must be responsible, dependable, and can work as part of a team.
A background or interest in natural resources is desirable but not required.
Saturday, March 11th 2017
Randy Holom Steps into Interim Administrator Position at Valley View Home
Glasgow, MT March 10, 2017: As of March 1st, Randy Holom, CEO at Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital, has undertaken the administrator position at Valley View Home.

This is a short-term position for Mr. Holom, as Valley View searches for an alternative interim administrator who can commit more time than Mr. Holom’s hospital responsibilities allow and with the goal of ultimately employing a permanent administrator of the facility.

However, even after Mr. Holom’s direct involvement is done, he and the hospital are committed to working together with Valley View to assist them in identifying a path that will take their mission of service to the community well into the future.

Finding an administrator is challenging, because he or she must hold a Montana Nursing Home Administrator license to even be qualified. 

Valley View is an important asset to the community, and since Mr. Holom does hold a Montana Nursing Home Administrator license, he, with the concurrence of the hospital Board, felt a collegial responsibility to assist Valley View during their time of need. This complimentary service to the community in no way indicates that the hospital is taking over Valley View, but rather it is an extension of FMDH’s values of commitment, compassion, innovation, stewardship, competence, communication, and cooperation.

Mr. Holom’s initial assessment for Valley View is positive, as he states, “There is a very good leadership team in place that is ready to take Valley View Home into the future.”


Saturday, March 11th 2017
FMDH Named As 2017 Top 100 Critical Access Hospital
Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital was recently named one of the Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals in the United States by iVantage Health Analytics and The Chartis Center for Rural Health.

“This achievement is very gratifying and validates our daily commitment to providing the best health care possible to our community, while maintaining an efficient and effective facility,” said Randy Holom, CEO of FMDH.

FMDH scored in the top 100 of Critical Access Hospitals on iVantage Health Analytics’ Hospital Strength INDEX®. The INDEX is the industry’s most comprehensive rating of rural providers. It provides the data foundation for the annual Rural Relevance Study, and its results are the basis for many of rural healthcare’s most prominent awards, advocacy efforts and legislative initiatives. The list of the Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals and more information about the study can be found at www.iVantageINDEX.com.

The Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals play a key role in providing a safety net to communities across America, and the INDEX measures them across eight pillars of hospital strength: Inpatient Share Ranking, Outpatient Share Ranking, Cost, Charge, Quality, Outcomes, Patient Perspectives, and Financial Stability.

“It’s more important than ever that rural hospitals proactively understand and address performance in the areas of cost, quality, outcomes and patient perspective. iVantage’s INDEX was designed to serve as this industry model,” said Michael Topchik, national leader of the Chartis Center for Rural Health.

“Across the spectrum of performance indicators, there are rural providers that are writing the blueprint for success as they transition to value-based healthcare. Our analysis shows that this group of top performers exhibits a focused concern for their community needs.”

Friday, March 10th 2017
Montana’s Senators Congratulate Three Montana Students on Military Academy Appointments

U.S. SENATE —U.S. Senators Steve Daines and Jon Tester today congratulated Missoula Sentinel High student Griffin Line, Kalispell Glacier High student Deagan Muth and Scobey High student Dean Cole on their appointments to America’s prestigious military academies.

Line was offered an appointment to the Air Force Academy. He is the captain of his soccer team and student body vice president. He also participates at the Sentinel DECA business club, varsity basketball, and serves as a ranch hand at Line Ranch.

Muth was also offered an appointment to the Air Force Academy. He is a varsity soccer player, track long distance varsity runner, and is nearing completion of his private pilot’s license. He also participates in speech and debate, raises a hog for 4-H and is a volunteer hunters safety instructor.

Cole was offered an appointment to the Naval Academy. He is an Eagle Scout and Varsity Captain of his football team. He is an award winning 4-H presenter for Market Swine. He is involved in Family, career and community leaders of America, Business Professionals of America, and High School Band where he plays Tuba.

“I’m thrilled to congratulate Griffin, Deagan and Dean on their prestigious appointment to our nation’s finest military academies,” Daines stated. “They will be an excellent ambassadors for Montana in the military.”

“Griffin, Deagan and Dean are sure to make Montana and this nation proud,” Tester said, “These young men have proven themselves to be excellent students and I look forward to seeing their bright futures bravely serving our nation.”

Daines and Tester nominated Line, Muth and Dean last year and both Senators called to congratulate them earlier today.

Montanans interested in applying for a military academy nomination in the future are encouraged to do so online at Daines' website and Tester's website.
Thursday, March 9th 2017
Montana's Missouri River Country: Supporting Tourism in Northeast Montana
Tourism matters to Northeast Montana

Missouri River Country is Montana’s northeastern tourism region. It covers Garfield, McCone, Phillips, Valley, Sheridan, Daniels, Richland and Roosevelt Counties along with the Fort Peck Reservation. A Board of Directors appointed by their respective County Commissioners manages the organization.

Missouri River Country assists in bringing visitors to Northeast Montana by marketing our area as a destination for the outdoor adventurist, geotourist, history buffs, Native American Culturists, Dinosaur Trail followers, hunters, fishermen, and women and the overall recreationists. One of our marketing methods is to print an informative and attractive travel planner. We do this in a two year cycle. One year we design the planner and the following year we print it.

We started the design process in July 2016 and we will be completing the design and have it ready for print later this year. To create an attractive planner we use a large variety of photos from our area. If you have an amazing photo that represents Northeast Montana and are willing to share it for publication in our travel planner please send it to the Missouri River Country office at: 2mtmrc@nemont.net Photos must have photo permission and be in high resolution of 300 dpi or greater. If we use the photo we will give photo credit to the photographer.

Travel and recreation by visitors to Northeast Montana is a vital contributor to the economy, so help promote your community and show the beauty and many attractions and events that makes our part of the state worth visiting.

For more information on Missouri River Country, please contact the office at 1-800-653-1319 or to sign up to receive our free Missouri River Country Travel Guide, or our quarterly newsletter visit our website at www.missouririver.visitmt.com or contact the Missouri River Country tourism office, 1-800-653-1319 or write to P.O. Box 118, Fort Peck, MT 59223.

Also, like us on Face Book, and follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Thursday, March 9th 2017
NAP Deadline is March 15, 2017
The Farm Service Agency would like to remind producers that the deadline to apply for 2017 noninsurable crop coverage (NAP) for all 2017 spring seeded crops is Wednesday, March 15, 2017.

NAP coverage is available only on crops for which Federal Crop Insurance (FCIC) is not available.

NAP coverage fees are $250 per crop per administrative county, not to exceed $750 per administrative county.

If you are eligible as a limited resource farmer, the service fee may be waived.

If you have any questions, please contact the Valley County Farm Service Agency at 228-4321, prior to March 15, 2017.

Tuesday, March 7th 2017
Tourism In Northeast Montana
Missouri River Country is Montana’s northeastern tourism region. It covers Garfield, McCone, Phillips, Valley, Sheridan, Daniels, Richland and Roosevelt Counties along with the Fort Peck Reservation. A Board of Directors appointed by their respective County Commissioners manages the organization.

Missouri River Country assists in bringing visitors to Northeast Montana by marketing our area as a destination for the outdoor adventurist, geotourist, history buffs, Native American Culturists, Dinosaur Trail followers, hunters, fishermen, and women and the overall recreationists. One of our marketing methods is to print an informative and attractive travel planner. We do this in a two year cycle. One year we design the planner and the following year we print it. We started the design process in July 2016 and we will be completing the design and have it ready for print later this year. To create an attractive planner we use a large variety of photos from our area. If you have an amazing photo that represents Northeast Montana and are willing to share it for publication in our travel planner please send it to the Missouri River Country office at: 2mtmrc@nemont.net Photos must have photo permission and be in high resolution of 300 dpi or greater. If we use the photo we will give photo credit to the photographer.

Travel and recreation by visitors to Northeast Montana is a vital contributor to the economy, so help promote your community and show the beauty and many attractions and events that makes our part of the state worth visiting.

For more information on Missouri River Country, please contact the office at 1-800-653-1319 or to sign up to receive our free Missouri River Country Travel Guide, or our quarterly newsletter visit our website at www.missouririver.visitmt.com or contact the Missouri River Country tourism office, 1-800-653-1319 or write to P.O. Box 118, Fort Peck, MT 59223. Also, like us on Face Book, and follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Tuesday, March 7th 2017
Valley County Election Office Sending Out Voter Confirmation Cards
The Valley County Commissioners earlier this year approved changing voting precincts and polling places in Valley County.

The election office will be sending out new Voter Confirmation Cards or ID Cards to identify which precinct each voter is in. All of the polling places are at the Glasgow Civic Center.

Non Absentee voters will receive a complementary absentee application. They can fill out the application and return it to us if they choose to vote by absentee instead of the poll.

If you do not receive a voter confirmation card in the next couple of weeks, and believe that you should have, please contact our office.

Tuesday, March 7th 2017
Two Men Sentenced On Drug Charges In State District Court
Kody Tolliver and Shannon Emeline were sentenced in District Court by Judge Yvonne Laird on Monday on 2 separate drug charges.

Great Falls resident Kody Tolliver was sentenced to 5 years in the Montana State Prison on the charge of criminal possession of dangerous drugs with intent to distribute-methamphetamine. Tolliver was arrested in October after authorities found one-half pound of methamphetamine in a vehicle he was driving. He was stopped by the MHP on Highway #2 west of Glasgow and the MHP Trooper became suspicious and got a warrant and seized Tolliver's vehicle.

Tolliver has a previous felony conviction in Cascade County on the charge of criminal endangerment.

Judge Laird also sentenced Shannon Ray Emeline to 10 years with the Montana Department of Corrections with 5 years suspended. Emeline was arrested by the VCSO in St. Marie when a search of his residence found illegal narcotics and a large amount of cash. He was convicted on the charge of criminal possession of dangerous drugs with intent to distribute-methamphetamine.

Emeline also has drug convictions in Yellowstone County and Custer County in Montana.

Monday, March 6th 2017
FWP Seeking Comments on Proposed Amendments for AIS
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is seeking comment on proposed amendments to rules that outline new regulations needed in the battle to contain, detect and prevent the risk of spreading invasive mussels and other aquatic invasive species to other state waters. Comments need to be submitted by March 17.

Invasive mussel larvae were detected for the first time in Montana in October 2016 in Tiber Reservoir – and “suspect” detections turned up in Canyon Ferry Reservoir, the Missouri River below Toston Dam, and the Milk River. The discovery triggered a natural resource emergency in Montana and led to several recommended strategies to manage the threat of invasive mussels spreading to other areas.

The proposed rule amendments outline several new regulations, including:

Transporting lake and river water would be prohibited.
Live bait and fish would be required to be transported in clean domestic water where allowed in current fishing regulations. Upon leaving Tiber and Canyon Ferry Reservoirs, bait and fish must be transported without water.
Mandatory inspections of out-of-state motorized or nonmotorized watercraft prior to launching on any Montana waterbody.
Mandatory inspections of motorized or nonmotorized watercraft traveling across the Continental Divide into the Columbia River Basin within Montana.
Mandatory inspections of all motorized or nonmotorized watercraft coming off Tiber and Canyon Ferry reservoirs, and decontamination if necessary.
Drain plugs would be required to be removed; if the watercraft doesn’t have drain plugs, reasonable measures must be taken to dry or drain all compartments, including bilges.

A public hearing on the proposed rule amendments is scheduled for March 14 in Helena at FWP Headquarters, 1420 E. 6th Ave. The hearing will begin at 6 p.m.

For more information or to comment on the rule online, visit the FWP website at fwp.mt.gov , click on the “News” tab and then click on rules or click "Public Notices." Comments on the proposed rule amendments are due by March 17. Comments can also be emailed to fwpexotics@mt.gov; or mailed to: Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Fisheries Division, P.O. Box 200701, Helena, MT 59620-0701.

Monday, March 6th 2017
Wildflower Reflections:  Families, Legacies, and Estate Planning
Wildflower Reflections:  Families, Legacies, and Estate Planning
MSU Extension, Valley County Community Foundation
Contact: Roubie Younkin

If you think estate planning is a boring topic, then you haven’t been to one of Dr. Marsha Goetting’s educational sessions.  MSU Extension Family Economics Specialists Marsha Goetting has a reputation for her ability to make presentations interesting and useful to participants.  She will keep you actively involved by having you answer questions with a response clicker.  For example, if a widow dies without a written will and has two children that proceeded her in death, what fraction do the grandchildren receive, if any?  Suppose a husband dies first in an accident and the wife dies three days later?  If they don’t have a written will or children, whose relatives receive the property?

Dr. Goetting has also enhanced her presentations by combining her appreciation of Montana wildflowers with her desire to help you remember strategies that can help you achieve your estate planning goals.  Plan to attend the session Wildflower Reflections:  Families, Legacies, and Challenging Decisions on Friday, March 31 at the Cottonwood Inn beginning at 10:00 a.m.

You will also discover how title to property has an impact on who receives it when you pass away. You will learn when a will or trust has control over your property and when neither one does.  You will find out how you can avoid probate with POD designations, TOD registrations and beneficiary deeds.  She will also highlight a Montana statute that allows you to distribute items that do not have a title.  Don’t miss this opportunity to attend a presentation that is not only enlightening, but also fun!!! 

The Valley County Community Foundation and Valley County Extension have partnered to bring this quality estate planning seminar to Glasgow. For more information please contact the Valley County Extension Office at 228-6241.

Sunday, March 5th 2017
Larry Gilbert Arrested For Violating Conditions Of His Release
39-year old Larry Gilbert was arrested on March 2nd in Wolf Point after he allegedly violated conditions of his release, according to Valley County Sheriff Vernon Buerkle. The Sheriff told Kltz/Mix-93 that Roosevelt County authorities arrested Gilbert in the late afternoon of March 2nd in Wolf Point. Gilbert is currently facing several felony charges in Valley County as the result of on an incident that occurred in late December.

Bond had been set at $250,000 but Gilbert posted bond on February 25th and was released from the Valley County Detention Center. He was ordered to follow several conditions as the result of the bond being paid. Sheriff Buerkle didn't elaborate what Gilbert had done to violate his conditions of release but stated that he will be transported back to the Valley County Detention Center as soon as he made an appearance in Roosevelt County Court.

Gilbert was arrested on December 27th in Glasgow and here is the story that was posted on Larry Gilbert's arrest from late December.

The incident occurred at a residence on 6th Avenue South in Glasgow on December 27th at 1am. According to Glasgow Police Chief Bruce Barstad, Larry Gilbert threatened a young adult male with an assault rifle by pointing it directly at him. An adult female who was at the residence was also threatened and physically assaulted by the assault rifle that Gilbert was holding.

Gilbert then allegedly dragged the woman by the hair while driving his vehicle, at which time the young adult male fired shots at the vehicle. At this time, Gilbert released the woman and drove down the street.

He was then apprehended by authorities and law enforcement discovered that Gilbert was carrying a concealed weapon.

Gilbert is charged with 2 counts of felony intimidation, 2 counts of assault with a weapon and 1 count of criminal endangerment. He is also charged with misdemeanor partner family member assault.

Additional criminal charges have been filed against Larry Gilbert by the VCSO. He has been charged with felony criminal mischief and misdemeanor carrying a concealed weapon. VCS Vern Buerkle told Kltz/Mix-93 News that Gilbert allegedly damaged equipment in the Valley County Detention Center and the result is the felonly criminal mischief charge.

The Glasgow Police Department and the Valley County Sheriff's Office continue this investigation.

Friday, March 3rd 2017
Seasonal Employment Opportunities with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks
Glasgow Interviews are March 13 (9a.m. to 3 p.m.) at FWP Headquarters at 1 Airport Road in Glasgow

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks is looking for seasonal employees to run
Aquatic Invasive Species Inspection and Decontamination Stations around the state.

Successful applicants receive competitive pay, $13.02/hr., potential benefits, and the opportunity to help protect Montana’s precious water resources.

Qualifications include:

Must be 18 years old or older.
Must possesses a valid driver’s license and clean driving record.
Must have excellent customer service skills and enjoy working with the public.
Must be responsible, dependable, and can work as part of a team.
A background or interest in natural resources is desirable but not required.
If you are interested, bring your resume or a completed state application to one of the locations listed below.

For questions call:

Kim Worthy 406-444-1289
Carol Fah 406-444-4657

Watercraft Inspectors Interviews
Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

Bring your resume or completed state application to one of the following locations at the specified time. We will interview as people arrive.

The full schedule for the state of Montana is available here.


Friday, March 3rd 2017
Governor Bullock Says Board Of Regents May Have To Close A College Campus Due To Budget Cuts
BOZEMAN — Gov. Steve Bullock says the state Board of Regents may have to consider closing a college campus to absorb a $23.3 million University System budget cut the Legislature is proposing.

The Bozeman Daily Chronicle reports that Bullock made the comment while meeting with the newspaper's editorial board on Wednesday. He did not identify a specific campus for closure.

Bullock says he expects the universities and colleges to have to raise tuition.


Deputy Commissioner of Higher Education Kevin McRae says Commissioner Clay Christian has told lawmakers and regents that if the budget cut remains at $23.3 million it would probably require significant tuition increases, significant cuts in educational programs or both.

Wednesday, March 1st 2017
Scobey Police Department Announces Arrest Of Glasgow Man On Drug Charges
Four Directions Drug Taskforce agencies (Scobey Police and Sheridan County Sheriffs Office), executed a search warrant on Timmons Street in Scobey with help from the United States Border Patrol.

During the search felony amounts of suspected methamphetamine, cocaine, prescription pills were recovered. Misdemeanor amounts of other prescription pills and marijuana and paraphernalia were also seized.

In addition to the narcotics, digital scales, packaging materials and transaction ledgers were located and seized.

A firearm related to the offense is in the process of being recovered.

Two suspects were arrested and transported to Sheridan County Jail and charged with felony criminal possession of dangerous drugs, and possession of dangerous drugs with intent to distribute. Other charges are pending.

The first person arrested was Logan Gardner out of Glasgow/Scobey.
Gardner has several recent convictions of possession and distribution of dangerous drugs including heroin and cocaine.

Ashely Sayler was the second individual arrested.

This bust shows that even a sleepy little community is not immune to the dangers of drugs.
We encourage everyone to be vigilant and report any suspected drug activity.
Thank you all for your trust and support.

Scobey Police Department / Four Directions Drug Taskforce
(Four Directions Drug Taskforce includes, Roosevelt, Sheridan, McCone Counties, the Fort Peck Tribes and the City of Scobey).

Wednesday, March 1st 2017
Stan Ozark Interviews Glasgow Superintendent Bob Connors
On Tuesday Stan Ozark interviewed Glasgow Superintendent Bob Connors. They talked about the school lunch program, levy election, technology and possible facility improvements.

Bob Connors.

Wednesday, March 1st 2017
Jay Witkowski Pleads Not Guilty To Deliberate Homicide Charge
Jay Witkowski appeared in District Court in Glasgow on February 22nd and pleaded not-guilty to the charge of Deliberate Homicide.

Witkowski is being represented by Clark Matthews and Terry Toavs and appeared before Judge Yvonne Laird.

Bond has been set at one million dollars and Witkowski continues to be incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center. An omnibus hearing has been set for April 17th.

Witkowski has been charged with deliberate homicide for purposely or knowingly causing the death of Evelynn Garcia on December 31st.

Wednesday, March 1st 2017
Tisha Reddog Reaches Plea Agreement On Drug Charges
A Roosevelt County woman, Tisha Reddog, has reached a plea agreement on 2 drug charges that have been filed against her by the Valley County Attorney.

Reddog was charged with felony criminal possession of dangerous drugs and misdemeanor criminal possession of drug paraphernalia.

The plea agreement sentenced Reddog to 3 years with the Montana Department of Corrections with all 3 years suspended on the felony drug charge and 6th months in the Valley County Detention Center on the misdemeanor charge with all 6 months suspended.

District Court Judge Yvonne Laird will formally sentence Reddog on March 20th.

Reddog was arrested on November 5th of 2016 on U.S. Highway #2 after she was found in the backseat of a vehicle wearing only shoes and shorts and possessing 3 syringes of suspected methamphetamine. The vehicle she was riding in was stopped by the Valley County Sheriff's Office after it was observed traveling in the wrong lane on Highway #2. The driver of the vehicle was also arrested in the incident.

Reddog has been released on her own recognizance and will next appear in court on March 20th.

Tuesday, February 28th 2017
BLM North Central Montana District Plans Prescribed Fire Projects
(LEWISTOWN, Mont.) – The Bureau of Land Management is planning to implement five prescribed fires in the North Central Montana District over the next 3-4 months as weather permits.

The prescribed burns are designed to reduce hazardous fuels and improve forest and rangeland health conditions.

The Mooney Coulee Prescribed Fire, administered by the Glasgow Field Office, will remove surface vegetation on approximately 700 acres of BLM –managed rangelands. The project is approximately seven miles northwest of Glasgow, Mont. The objective of the burn is to remove all surface fuel to enhance the effectiveness of converting decadent stands of crested wheat grass to native species.

The Theony Willow Prescribed Fire, also administered by the Glasgow Field Office, will treat about 150 acres 50 miles northwest of Glasgow, Mont.

The Upper Missouri River Breaks National Monument is planning to implement the 300-acre Woods Bottom Prescribed Fire about one mile south of Loma, Mont.

The Lewistown Field Office will implement the 2,500-acre Tin Can Hill Unit I Prescribed Fire Project 15 Miles northeast of Winnett, Mont.; and the 25-acre Limekiln Canyon Prescribed Fire Project seven miles northeast of Lewistown, Mont. The primary objective of the Tin Can Hill Unit I Prescribed Fire is to reduce fuel loads while improving wildlife habitat and grazing forage. Operational objectives include a reduction in stand density and pine and juniper encroachment.

If fuel moisture and weather conditions allow, these burns will be conducted by fire personnel from several federal, state and local agencies as well as BLM staff from the local offices. For more information, call BLM Fuels Specialist Josh Barta at 406-538-1971.

Monday, February 27th 2017
Montana Senate Approves Legislation To Allow Native American Students To Wear Regalia At High School Graduation Ceremonies
HELENA — Aspen Many Hides recalled being in tears as she stood in line five years ago waiting to receive her high school diploma in Polson. Her mother was frantically trying to remove the beads she had sewn into her cap as a sign of accomplishment and to show her pride in her Native American heritage.

Just minutes before the procession was to begin marching, Many Hides was told the beads, particularly those spelling out her family name, violated school policy and had to be removed if she wanted to march.

"I'm very proud of where I came from and my name," she said, explaining why she was in tears that day. "As Native people, it's important we have an opportunity to represent ourselves with regalia. For many Native Americans, graduation from high school is huge because of so many challenges in life."

Over the years, controversies have erupted not only across Montana, but in other parts of the country as students of color seek to blend the regalia of their cultural heritage with the pomp of high school graduation.

Earlier this week, a legislative committee in Montana tabled a proposal that would allow Native American students to wear regalia, such as embroidered beads and eagle feathers, along with their caps and gowns. But supporters used a special rule to force the bill out of committee and onto the Senate floor for further consideration Friday.

The legislation passed the State Senate 38-12 on Friday and now heads to the House. Area Senators split on the legislation with Senators Frank Smith voting yes while Senator Mike Lang voted no.

School officials in El Reno, Oklahoma, last year took away a hand-beaded graduation cap from a Native American student just before graduation, saying it violated policy — although school officials said they do allow Native students to wear eagle feathers.

In California, the ACLU intervened on behalf two years ago for a student who was later allowed to wear an eagle feather as part of his tassel.

"In this day and age, this is still a surprise. Part of it is the lack of understanding about how important these items are," said Matthew Campbell, a staff attorney with the Colorado-based Native American Rights Fund.

Monday, February 27th 2017
Local State Senators Vote For Measure Allowing Mail Ballot Election For Special Congressional Election
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The Montana Senate has endorsed a bill to allow counties to conduct this year's expected election for U.S. House by mail.

The Senate voted 37-13 Friday for the measure. The legislation now advances to the Montana House for consideration. Both area State Senators, Mike Lang and Frank Smith voted for the measure.

If U.S. Rep. Ryan Zinke is confirmed as President Donald Trump's Interior secretary, Gov. Steve Bullock will call a special election for a replacement to serve the rest of Zinke's congressional term.

The bill's sponsor, Republican Sen. Steve Fitzpatrick of Great Falls, says county clerks from across the state requested the option of holding a mail-only election. He estimates it would save the counties $500,000 or more.

Opponents of the measure said there are concerns of voter fraud. Montana Republican Party Chairman Jeff Essmann says a mail-in ballot also would give Democrats an advantage.

Friday, February 24th 2017
New Services Offered From The Valley County Health Department Starting In April
New services are coming soon to the Valley County Health Department.

Beginning April 1, we will expand oral health services in Valley County to provide fluoride varnish to children 6 months through age 5.

In an effort to promote health and prevent disease, our nurses will educate parents about dental health and hygiene.

Why fluoride varnish?

· Can prevent tooth decay, also called dental caries. Fluoride varnish is safe and effective.

· Fluoride varnish can reverse early caries (white spots) and slow enamel destruction in active Early Childhood Caries.

· Fluoride varnish is one part of a comprehensive approach to a child's oral health.

Fluoride varnish is recommended in the primary care setting every 3–6 months starting at tooth emergence for all children. (American Academy of Pediatrics, Sept 2014, www.aap.org)

*One out of 10 two-year-olds already has one or more cavities.

*By age three, 28% of children have one or more cavities.

*By age five, nearly 50% of children have one or more cavities.

Oral health is essential for overall health at any age.

Call 406-228-6261 to make an appointment.

Thursday, February 23rd 2017
2 Trustee Positions On Glasgow School Board Up For Election In 2017
Have you ever considered serving on the Glasgow School Board. There are currently 2 positions that expire in May of this year. The terms of John Daggett and Suzanne Billingsley expire this year.

The school election is set for May 2nd. If you are considering being a candidate for the Glasgow School Board you have until March 23rd to file the necessary paperwork.

Thursday, February 23rd 2017
Free Movie To Be Shown February 27
Join the Montana Tobacco Use Prevention Program & Valley C.A.R.E. Coalition this coming Monday, February 27th, from 6-8:30pm for a FREE youth movie night at the Glasgow Evangelical Church!

This event is open to all community youth ages 13-19 years old, and is completely free of charge. We'll provide the movie (The Blind Side), pizza, cotton candy, booths sponsored by both MTUPP and the Glasgow Police Dept., and an awesome gift for everyone who attends (with an additional goodie bag for those who sign up to be a part of the Youth Activism Coalition)!

Call the Valley County Health Department at 228-6261 with any questions.

Wednesday, February 22nd 2017
State Representative Austin Knudsen Introduces Legislation That Would Prohibit Companies Boycotting Israel From Doing Business With State Of Montana
HELENA -- In response to a recent movement to boycott, divest and place sanctions, or BDS, on trades with Israel, Montana lawmakers are considering a bill that would prohibit companies that are involved in the movement from doing business with the State of Montana.

House Bill 501 would require the Board of Investments to receive certification that companies are not involved in boycotts of Israel before doing business.

Mona Jamison, lobbyist for several organizations, supported the bill and testified on her own behalf during the hearing Tuesday.

“Because to standby and do nothing is to sanction what is going on,” Jamison said.

David Ewer, Executive Director of Montana’s Board of Investments, opposed the bill and read the role of the board during his testimony.

“It doesn’t say with passion. No, just the opposite, it’s supposed to be dispassionate – it’s supposed to be objective,” Ewer said.

Ewer also added that it would be hard to single out these companies, but it can be done.

SK Rossi, American Civil Liberties Union of Montana lobbyist, also opposed the bill. She said if the bill were to go into law, it would violate the First Amendment rights of companies in the state.

“It worries me to think that we’re going to start asking folks who want to interact with our state government what political beliefs they hold, and targeting them for those beliefs,” Rossi said.

Rep. Austin Knudsen, R-Culbertson, is the sponsor of the bill. He disagreed with the argument that the bill violates any First Amendment rights.

“But what we’re doing here is making a policy statement, that as the state of Montana – fine, you want to boycott the nation of Israel? That’s fine, you can do that. We choose as a matter of policy in the state of Montana is not going to do business with you,” Knudsen said.

Webb Brown, Montana Chamber of Commerce lobbyist, supported the bill and said the state eventually plans on developing a trade mission in Israel.

“Rather than a punitive measure with the boycotts, we’d would rather there be a promotional measure to increase the cooperation, and increase the opportunities that we see in Israel as well,” Brown said.

This was the House State Administration’s Committee first hearing on the bill.

Freddy Monares is a reporter with the UM Legislative News Service, a partnership of the University of Montana School of Journalism, the Montana Broadcasters Association and the Greater Montana Foundation.

Wednesday, February 22nd 2017
Ducks Unlimited Banquet Set For March 11th
The Missouri/Milk River chapter of Ducks Unlimited will be hosting its 31st Annual Fundraising banquet in support of DU’s 80th year of existence on Saturday, March 11 at the Cottonwood Inn with doors opening at 5:30 P.M. The Cottonwood will be serving their Prime Rib dinner just past 6:30 P.M.

Ducks Unlimited has provided the local chapter with an outstanding line-up of Guns and other DU memorabilia. There is also an awesome lineup of prizes and services provided by the local community.

Some of the prizes to be take home by way of Live Auction, Silent Auction and Fun Raffles are: DU’s Shotgun, Rifle, Pistol, Decoy and Knife of the year; Lots of Guns; Round Trip Airline Tickets from Cape Air; an Alaskan Halibut Fishing Trip, an Argentine Dove Hunt, a “Steak at the Lake” package for twelve people and Ladies…there are a ton of prizes just waiting for you!

The money banquet attendees spend at this event is put to work in the local area. DU spends $3 for every $1 raised in Montana for local projects. In Montana, over 146,350 acres have been enhanced or protected and over 73,871 acres have been provided technical assistance. Phillips and Valley Counties are primary benefactors of DU’s work. To date, DU has completed over 692 Projects spending $25.5 Million dollars in Montana. Valley County has received $2.2 Million impacting over 31,000 acres.

We truly are lucky to be a benefactor of DU’s great conservation work….which benefits over 900 species of wildlife.

Early Bird Tickets are available at D&G Sports & Western and at Valley Bank through Monday, March 6. After that you will need to contact Ken Jansa at 228-2031 for ticket availability. For more information about Ducks Unlimited, please go to www.ducks.org

Montana law (MCA 23-5-157) requires that all raffles and games of chance must be paid for with cash, check or debit card. Auction items and dinner may be paid for with any major credit card, cash, check

Saturday, February 18th 2017
Region 6 Hunter Ed Courses
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Hunter Education course dates have been set for many areas across Region 6. All hunter education classes are free of charge. In the next month, classroom courses are being held in:
Havre: starting Feb. 23
Malta: starting Feb. 27
Bainville: starting March 4
Circle: staring March 6
Glasgow: starting March 6
Hinsdale: starting March 6
Scobey: starting March 6
Saco: starting April 3

All students must register online at the FWP website: fwp.mt.gov; click on the education tab, then click “hunter education programs”. Next, “Find a class or field course” and search for the available class in your area. Detailed instructions on dates, times, and other information will be found at each class’ registration page.

For youth to be eligible to hunt and be fully certified during the 2017 season, hunters must be 12-years old by January 16, 2018. Students aged 10 and 11 can take a course and hunt as an apprentice, but will not be fully certified until the year they turn 12. All registrants for these events must be 10 years old by the first day of class.

There are also two adult online field courses being held in the next month:
Havre: Feb. 21
Glasgow: March 12

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online hunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. Adults looking to complete the online course can find instructions at fwp.mt.gov . The Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.

If there are any questions, please call the Glasgow FWP office at 228-3700.

Thursday, February 16th 2017
Residents Removed From Roosevelt Hotel After Revocation Of Occupancy Permit
Officials with the City of Glasgow and other public officials removed residents from the Roosevelt Hotel in Glasgow after the revocation of the occupancy permit of the building.

The revocation of the occupancy permit occurred February 10th after the Glasgow Police Department responded to a complaint of water coming in from the ceiling. The water was leaking from ceiling on third floor of the building and draining into basement and collecting into electrical fixtures.

The Glasgow Police Department and the Glasgow Public Works Department also responded and found several issues with the electrical system in the building. The Roosevelt had been without water service for several days according to city officials.

The resulting actions included revocation of the occupancy permit and the removal of all residents from the building. The Roosevelt had ceased operating as a hotel and had become a long-term boarding house for several Glasgow residents.

Wednesday, February 15th 2017
Mt Legislature considers bill to allow school employees with concealed carry permits to carry handguns on school grounds.
HELENA -- Lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow full-time school employees with concealed carry permits to carry handguns on school grounds.

House Bill 385 would create the Montana Safe Schools Act.

John Moffatt, a volunteer for Moms Demand Action for Gun Safety in America, testified against the bill on Tuesday in front of the House Judiciary Committee

Moffatt was a principal at Fergus High School in Lewistown when he was shot in his abdomen by an active shooter on campus.

“I know absolutely there is nothing I could have done, even had I been armed at that time,” Moffatt said.

Moffatt was joined by 24 others testifying against the bill including mothers, educators and counselors.

“It’s overwhelmingly opposed by the people closest to the situation; the teachers and administrators. Supporters of this legislation have absolutely no skin in the game,” Moffatt said.

President of the Montana Shooting Sports Association Gary Marbut, one of two people who testified for the bill, said he’s taught gun safety to more than 5,000 people and said teachers can be safe with firearms as well.

“If they are sufficiently competent to be entrusted with our children, I absolutely guarantee you that I can train them, or others can train them, to be perfectly safe with firearms,” Marbut said.

Marbut brought up the case of Sandy Hook Elementary School where 20 students and six adults were shot and killed by an armed gunman.

“That the principal died beseeching the assailant to not kill children, but I have to tell that beseeching just did not work. It did not work for her. She died,” Marbut said.

Rep. Seth Berglee, R-Joliet, is the sponsor of the bill and said the bill would create a line of first defense for schools.

“It does make sense in the case of an active shooter, that having individuals in those systems armed would be a good idea and would be effective,” Berglee said.

Moffatt said arming anybody in a scenario like this would not have made his experience any better.

“And being surrounded by screaming, yelling kids, staff members would have added to what was a disastrous situation,” Moffatt said.

Freddy Monares is a reporter with the UM Legislative News Service, a partnership of the University of Montana School of Journalism, the Montana Broadcasters Association and the Greater Montana Foundation.

Wednesday, February 15th 2017
FWP Accepting Comments on Draft EA for Vandalia Wildlife Management Area Grazing Lease Renewal
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is proposing to renew the grazing lease for the Vandalia Wildlife Management Area (WMA) until Sept. 15, 2023. Comments are being sought on the draft environmental assessment (EA) concerning the grazing renewal.

Vandalia WMA is comprised of 310 acres, bordering the south side of the Milk River, and consists of sagebrush grasslands, cottonwood and green ash stands, and wetland and riparian areas. The WMA is located approximately 2.5 miles southeast of Hinsdale. Grazing would continue to be managed under the current rest-rotation grazing system.

The draft EA can be found on the FWP website. A copy of the EA may also be obtained by contacting the FWP Glasgow Regional Office at 406-228-3700 or by emailing dhenry@mt.gov.

The public comment period on the draft EA will extend for 28 days, starting Feb. 15, and comments will be accepted until 5 p.m., March 14, 2017. Comments can be submitted online, emailed to dhenry@mt.gov, or written comments and can be mailed to:

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks
Attn: Vandalia WMA Grazing Lease Renewal
1 Airport Rd.
Glasgow, MT 59230

Tuesday, February 14th 2017
Expiring CRP Workshop
There will be a an Expiring CRP Workshop held at the Cottonwood Inn & Suites on February 24 for producers with CRP expiring September 30th of this year.

The workshop will cover options available to producers after expiration of the contract and is held in conjunction with Natural Resources Conservation Service.

The workshop runs from 10AM to 3PM. Lunch will be provided to those who RSVP.
Please RSVP to Stephanie Viste at the Valley County FSA Office or if you have any questions at 406-228-4321 ext. 108.

Tuesday, February 14th 2017
Tickets Still Available For Saturday’s Hi-Line Sportsmen Banquet
Tickets will be available at the door of Saturday’s Hi-Line Sportsmen fundraising banquet in Glasgow, but in order to guarantee your spot in St. Raphael’s Church parish center, contact a committee member prior to the event.

The Feb. 18 banquet, which features a prime-rib dinner and all the trimmings prepared by the VFW Post 3107 and Ladies Auxiliary, starts at 4:30 p.m. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m. Every admission ticket, regardless of membership level, includes prime-rib dinner and a chance to participate in a number of raffles and live and silent auctions.

Tickets cost $30 for singles, $50 for couples, $200 for sponsor couples, $700 for an 8-seat table; or $800 for an 8-seat sponsor. Sponsors receive an embroidered Hi-Line Sportsmen pull-over and are entered in a drawing for a Winchester SXP 12 gauge shotgun.

In addition to a number of framed prints, home décor items, gift certificates and merchandise donated by local businesses, and various sporting goods, special opportunities such as fishing trips and a dozen guns will be distributed via raffles and auctions.

Firearms, sporting goods, and outdoor opportunities include:
• a Browning X-Bolt in 6.5 Creedmoor, AR-15, Remington Model 700 Long Range in choice of caliber, T/C Venture predator package in choice of caliber, a Stevens 555 over-and-under 12 gauge, Ruger American Rifle with Vortex scope, and a Remington Model 1187 semi-auto shotgun;
• Bear Archery bows;
• Vortex binocular and spotting scope;
• Final entry spot for this summer’s Milk River Catfish Classic;
• A certificate for a Montana Rifle Company X2 rifle in caliber of choice;
• A day of walleye fishing with Ken Schmidt, a day of salmon fishing with Scott Billingsley;
• Gear for bow fishing, fly fishing, kayaking, and other sporting goods;
• Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship Gun, a Henry Golden Boy;
• Plus many, many other items, gift certificates, and gear.

The Hi-Line Sportsmen are dedicated to “keeping conservation local,” working with agencies, landowners, and fellow sportsmen to improve wildlife habitat for a wide range of species, facilitate sportsmen access across Valley County and Northeastern Montana, and promote outdoor recreation opportunities year-round.

For tickets, see any Hi-Line Sportsmen committee member or call Jennifer Jackson at 263-7339. You can also check out the group’s Facebook page for frequent updates.

Monday, February 13th 2017
Glasgow Superintendent Bob Connors Issues Statement Regarding Irle School Lunch Program
This past week, we again had issues at the Irle school concerning our lunch program. A number of our 4th and 5th graders did not receive the main line choice (sloppy joes). The students were allowed to replace the sloppy joes with a peanut butter sandwich or lunch meats from the salad bar. (We did run out of lunch meat, but had peanut butter sandwiches available.) All students had the opportunity to eat lunch.

We have addressed the portion control issue that caused the sloppy joe shortage this past week. As our District kitchen sends the meals to Irle, we have also changed our distribution check out as well as our check in procedures at both sites. We have addressed personnel to inform them of the serious nature of having main line shortages.

I personally apologize. We are, and will continue to evaluate all of the District’s programs.

Monday, February 13th 2017
Ice Fishing Tournament Winners Announced!
The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture held its 19th Annual Ice Fishing Derby at the Dredge Cuts Trout Pond at Fort Peck Lake on February 11, 2017. It was a die-hard day for the fishermen, women & children who chose to participate despite the high wind gusts of 49 mph and nice temperatures of 32 to 37 degrees. The contest had 62 participates and 177 holes were sold. We had participants from Glasgow, Jordan, Poplar, Glendive, Fort Peck, Wolf Point, Brockway, Nashua, Miles City, St. Marie, Belgrade, Billings, Grass Range, Antelope, and Minot, ND. An estimate of 50 more people came to observe the tournament and enjoy the festivities.

A total of $4560.00 in cash, prizes, and raffles were awarded to the participates. The 50/50 was won by Traci Harada in the amount of $640. The Yetti cooler was won by Josh Sillerud. A total of 65 fish were weighed with ten being caught & weighed within the first ten minutes! The results were:
1st Place- $2000- Brad Smudzinski of Fort Peck
2nd Place-$1000-Glasgow Evangelical Church, Glasgow
3rd Place-$ 500-Rick Viste, Glasgow
4th Place-$250-DP Schlosser, Glendive, MT
5th Place- $125-Chris Marrow & Katie Busch of Fort Peck, MT
6th Place- $ 75- Sam & Zac Olson of Fort Peck & Glasgow
7th Place-$50-Levi & Rivers Sugg, Glasgow
The cash prizes were awarded at the Gateway in Fort Peck following the Derby along with several door prizes donated by the Sponsors that consist of: Coca-Cola, Cottonwood Inn & Suites, D&G Sports & Western, Edward Jones, Ezzie’s Wholesale, First Community Bank, Glasgow Distributors, Hi Line Ford, JR’s Party Store, KLTZ/KLAN Radio Stations, Lakeridge, MW Farm Bureau Insurance, Nemont, Nemont Beverage Corp., Newton Motors, Northern Prairie Auto Sales, NorthWestern Energy, Reynolds Market, The Gateway, Tom Thompson & Sons, Valley Bank, and the Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture.

Thursday, February 9th 2017
City Public Works Director Discusses Glasgow Levee
Thursday, February 9th 2017
MSU Native American Student Montana Wilson Wins Prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship
From MSU News Service

BOZEMAN — Montana Wilson, a Montana State University student from Poplar, has won a Gates Cambridge Scholarship that will fund graduate work at the University of Cambridge in England. Wilson, who is an enrolled Gros Ventre of the Fort Belknap Indian Community and a member of the Assiniboine and Sioux tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, is the first Native American Gates Cambridge Scholar in the history of the scholarship program, according to the Gates Cambridge Trust.

Wilson is one of 36 Americans and 54 scholars from other parts of the world to receive the prestigious scholarship funded by the Gates Foundation. He plans to use the scholarship to earn a master’s degree in development studies at Cambridge.

“This means a lot to me,” Wilson said. “The biggest thing is it has a lot to do with the future work I’m going to do. I have every intention of going into economic development, and this is an amazing opportunity to study at one of the world’s leading universities, in a program that is leading the field in economic development. It will give me the tools to come back and help my tribes and various tribes around the country.”

Wilson is the second MSU student or graduate to receive the scholarship; Hilary Fabich, then a recent MSU graduate, won the scholarship in 2012. The scholarship, which was instituted in 2000 by Bill and Melinda Gates, is similar to the Rhodes Scholarship, but recipients attend Cambridge rather than Oxford, according to Ilse-Mari Lee, dean of the MSU Honors College. Recipients are selected based on outstanding intellectual ability, leadership potential, a commitment to improving the lives of others and a good fit between the applicant's qualifications and aspirations and the postgraduate program at Cambridge for which they are applying.

Wilson is a senior in the Honors College with dual degrees in economics in the College of Agriculture and College of Letters and Science and political science in the College of Letters and Science, and with a minor in Native American studies. While studying at MSU he previously won a prestigious Udall Scholarship from the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation in the Tribal Public Policy category.

“In my frequent conversations with Montana, I have been deeply impressed by his humility, sense of compassion and powerful intellect,” Lee said. “He is destined to lead and serve. It is gratifying to imagine him taking his place within the international community of Gates Cambridge Scholars as they prepare to address the global challenges of the 21st century.”

“Montana represents a new generation of MSU Native students: worldly, savvy, extremely intelligent, but committed to helping tribal communities with the skills, experience and energy they possess,” said Walter Fleming, head of the MSU Department of Native American Studies. “Within Native communities, Montana is well respected as someone who will put all his energies toward success, whether it is running a complex pow wow or helping tutor a friend.”

Wendy Stock, professor in the MSU Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics and one of Wilson’s mentors, noted that his record of leadership and commitment to public service is exceptional.

“Montana’s academic ability, intellectual curiosity, positive attitude in the face of challenges and willingness to work hard, combined with his two majors in economics and political science, will make him a great asset to the Gates Cambridge Scholars program,” Stock said. “Among the thousands of students that I have taught over the past 20-plus years, Montana is easily among the top one percent in terms of intellectual ability, maturity and leadership potential.”

Wilson’s college education began in 2009 at Dartmouth College, where he studied government and entered the Central Intelligence Agency’s Pathways program, a government program established to give students an opportunity to explore federal careers.

As a sophomore, he participated in the global study abroad program Semester at Sea through the University of Virginia, where he encountered life-changing experiences that would steer him toward a new course. One of those occurred after the ship docked in Hong Kong and Wilson traveled to Tibet with a group of students. While there, Wilson said he witnessed a Tibetan monk and nun set themselves on fire in the town square to protest China’s occupation of Tibet.

“As a Native American, I could relate to that feeling of being oppressed,” Wilson said in a 2016 interview with MSU. “That’s what changed what I wanted to do. I realized the CIA was not for me.”

Wilson took a year off from school and returned to his reservation, where he initially interned in the tribes’ public defender’s office. Eventually, he was asked to write motions and briefs for misdemeanor offenses because he had taken a federal Indian law class at Dartmouth. He was so successful that the court administrator suggested he take the Tribal Bar exam as an “educational experience,” Wilson said. He passed the Bar and became a lay advocate for the public defender’s office, eventually winning a lawsuit against a tribal court judge accused of violating juveniles’ rights in her court.

Though he had planned to return to Dartmouth, Wilson accepted a promotion as the

deputy chief prosecutor. He was assigned to adult criminal court and also oversaw juvenile court, arraigning as many as 200 people a week, handling a number of pre-trials, bench and jury trials, and responding to motions.

Being back on the reservation led Wilson to reconnect with his culture and take on more tribal responsibilities. Four years ago, he decided to forgo Dartmouth and enroll instead at nearby MSU.

“I decided Dartmouth was no longer my fit,” he said. “I found out classes at MSU, especially in economics, were comparable to my classes at Dartmouth.”

And, he said, his experience at MSU has been “really awesome” because of the level that he has gotten to know his professors.

“I’m in four different academic programs here, and I have really close ties to professors in all four programs,” Wilson said.

In particular, he credits mentors Stock and Linda Young, head of the Department of Political Science, as well as Lee, with helping him make the most of his education and achieve his goals.

After completing his degree at Cambridge, Wilson plans to come back to Montana to help his tribes. His career goal is to head his tribes’ economic development office, although he says there are other things his tribes are interested in having him help them accomplish, as well, and he is open to working where he is most needed.

“I plan to help with issues that (the tribes) prioritize as something they want dealt with,” Wilson said.

“It’s such a huge honor to be able to go to Cambridge, and really I’m doing it for my tribes,” Wilson added. “The hope of this is that other Native students who come to MSU from my reservation and from other reservations can see that they can accomplish their goals, as well.”

Wednesday, February 8th 2017
First Annual Hi-Line Sportsmen Banquet Is February 18
Catfish Classic entry, guns galore, sporting goods, and home décor on the block at 1st annual Hi-Line Sportsmen banquet Feb. 18

You can bid on the final entry in the Milk River Catfish Classic, win a hunting rifle, buy framed art and other home décor, or win all sorts of premium sporting goods. But you can’t do any of that if you’re not at the Hi-Line Sportsmen first-annual fundraising banquet on Saturday night, Feb. 18.

The banquet, which features a prime-rib dinner and all the trimmings prepared by the VFW Post 3107 and Ladies Auxiliary, starts at 4:30 p.m. at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church parish center in Glasgow. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m.

Prizes will be distributed on games of chance, raffles, and both silent and live auctions. Items on the block at the banquet include:

· 11 guns that will be given to winners of several games of chance. Firearms include a Browning X-Bolt in 6.5 Creedmoor, AR-15, Remington Model 700 Long Range in choice of caliber, T/C Venture predator package in choice of caliber, a Stevens 555 over-and-under 12 gauge, Ruger American Rifle with Vortex scope, and a Remington Model 1187 semi-auto shotgun, among several others;
· Bear Archery bows;
· Vortex binocular and spotting scope;
· Framed wildlife-art prints;
· Makita tool kit, air compressor, stainless steel rolling workbench, space heater, and fireplace entertainment center with 49-inch TV;
· Last entry spot for this summer’s Milk River Catfish Classic;
· A certificate for a Montana Rifle Company X2 rifle in caliber of choice;
· A day of walleye fishing with Ken Schmidt, a day of guided salmon fishing with Scott Billingsley;
· Gear for bow fishing, fly fishing, kayaking, and other sporting goods;
· Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship Gun, a Henry Golden Boy;
· Plus many, many other items, gift certificates, and gear donated by local businesses

Tickets are still available. Cost is $30 for singles, $50 for couples, $200 for sponsor couples, $700 for a table for eight; or $800 for a sponsor table for eight. Sponsors receive two meals, a gift, and are entered in a drawing for a Winchester SXP 12 gauge shotgun.

For tickets, see any Hi-Line Sportsmen committee member or call Jennifer Jackson at 263-7339. You can also check out the group’s Facebook page for frequent updates.

Wednesday, February 8th 2017
Senator Mike Lang introduces legislation that would bar people owing child support from getting hunting licenses
HELENA - Under a bill in the Montana Legislature, people who owe child support in Montana could be barred from buying a hunting, fishing, or trapping license.

“I had a guy that came up to me and he said I don’t like your bill. I’m not paying my child support now because my wife wouldn’t let me see the children,” said Sen. Mike Lang, R-Malta, who is carrying Senate Bill 172. “OK, so I said, ‘well she was bad, now you’re creating another bad, who’s really losing here? The kids are losing.’”

Lang said the bill is needed because there are currently 33,144 cases of child support enforcement that are in arrears in Montana, and that those cases have accumulated a debt of a little over $147 million. Lang said his bill should lower these numbers.

Committee member Sen. Jennifer Fielder, R-Thompson Falls, said she has concerns with the bill, especially if hunting rights are stripped away from someone who provides meat for their families for sustenance rather than hunting for sport.

“I’m really concerned that we’re actually not helping families, we’re actually going to be making it worse for some families,” Fielder said.

No opponents testified at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday morning and the committee did not immediately vote on the bill.

Cole Grant is a reporter with the UM Legislative News Service, a partnership of the University of Montana School of Journalism, the Montana Broadcasters Association and the Greater Montana Foundation.

Tuesday, February 7th 2017
Jay Witkowski Charged With Deliberate Homicide
28-year old Jay Witkowski has been charged with deliberate homicide in the death of Glasgow resident Evelynn Garcia. Witkowski is currently incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center and has been since his arrest on December 31st. Bond has been set a $1 million dollars.
According to court documents, Evelynn Garcia was discovered lying semi-conscious in the north bound lane on Montana Highway #24 east of Glasgow on December 31st. Garcia was discovered at 6:50pm.

At 7:43pm that same evening, law enforcement was notified that a man had shown up at a Valley County residence claiming that someone had tried to carjack his vehicle and tried to stab him. When law enforcement arrived they determined the man was Jay Witkowski. He claimed that he had been confronted by 4 large men while in his vehicle with Garcia. An altercation occurred and one of the alleged assailants had a knife and Garcia was stabbed. Witkowski claimed he got away from the assailants and drove away in his vehicle. When law enforcement asked Witkowski where Garcia was, he stated Evelynn was probably in the road where he had left her. Witkowski told law enforcement that he had come to Glasgow to pick up Garcia and take her to Billings.

Witkowski was arrested by the Valley County Sheriff’s Office. Garcia was transported by air ambulance to Billings where she died on January 3rd. Witkowski was initially charged with assault with a weapon, aggravated assault and criminal endangerment. When Garcia passed away it was expected that Witkowski would be charged with deliberate homicide and that charged was filed against him on February 6th.

According to court documents, investigators found blood evidence in Witkowski’s vehicle that indicated Garcia was stabbed while seated in the passenger side of the vehicle. An autopsy indicated that Garcia was stabbed on the left side of her body and her clothing was soaked in blood. Investigators also observed a large amount of blood where Garcia may have received a blow to the back of her head. Law enforcement also found a tire iron with Garcia’s blood on it.

An autopsy indicated that Garcia’s cause of death was stab wounds and blunt force trauma to the head resulting in a skull fracture. Garcia had stab wounds on her left arm, hand, throat and on her chest.

The vehicle driven by Witkowski also had a shattered windshield and he has claimed that he hit one of the alleged assailants with his vehicle and that is why the windshield was shattered. Court documents state that Garcia’s blood was found on the front of the vehicle, hood, roof, trunk and passenger side of the vehicle. An investigator from the Montana Highway Patrol has stated that while Garcia might have been struck by the vehicle he does not believe the fatal head injuries occurred as a result of a collision with the vehicle driven by Witkowski.

Law enforcement is stating in court documents that there is no evidence at this time to indicate that anyone other when Witkowski was at the location where Garcia was assaulted and subsequently found on December 31st.


Monday, February 6th 2017
Governor Bullock Announces Grant Funding For Enhancement Of Tourism Infrastructure In Montana
MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock today announced $316,314 in funding for development and enhancement of tourism infrastructure in 11 Montana communities.

“Montana’s tourism economy is strong and growing, attracting millions of folks from across the world to enjoy our public lands and wide open spaces,” said Governor Steve Bullock. “These funds help our communities increase the economic impact of tourism and take advantage of innovative new marketing opportunities.”

The funds are being made available through the Montana Department of Commerce, Office of Tourism and Business Development Tourism Grant Program. The program awards funds to projects that strengthen Montana’s economy through the development and enhancement of the state’s tourism industry. The program offers funding in three categories: tourism digital development, tourism infrastructure and tourism event paid media advertising.

Full List of Grant Recipients:

McCone County received $2,000 from the Digital Development category to add an outdoor security system to the McCone County Museum in Circle.

Montana Dude Ranchers Association of Helena received $3,766 from the Digital Development category for visitor-related website upgrades.

Teton County Development Organization received $14,000 from the Digital Development category for visitor-related website upgrades in Choteau.

The City of Cut Bank received $99,687 from the Infrastructure category to add a roof to its city park pavilion.

The City of Forsyth received $1,150 from the Infrastructure category for Custer Circle historic trail signage.

Great Falls Tourism received $20,000 from the Infrastructure category for installation of new digital displays and facility improvements in the visitor information center.

Great Plains Dinosaur Museum of Malta received $4,919 from the Infrastructure category for new exhibit and prep area construction.

Last Chance Tour Train of Helena received $34,183 from the Infrastructure category for tour train repairs.

Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana of Charlo received $28,338 from the Infrastructure category to replace its HVAC system.

The Roxy Theater of Missoula received $67,605 from the Infrastructure category for historic preservation of the building’s façade.

The Wheatland Chamber of Commerce received $40,666 from the Infrastructure category for enhancements to Chief Joseph Park in Harlowton, including new bike facilities and electrical upgrades to the RV parking area.
Monday, February 6th 2017
Applications now available for this year’s VCCF grants
The Valley County Community Foundation will award its annual grants this spring, grant committee chair Sam Waters announced this week.

VCCF provides grants to local organizations with the charitable 501(c) 3 IRS designation and local government projects. Specifically, VCCF awards grants in these areas: arts and culture, basic human needs, economic development, education, and natural resources and conservation. Projects in all parts of Valley County have received grants, Waters said, adding that over the years, competition for grant dollars has increased.

“Time spent on the application is time well spent,” Waters said. “The average dollar amount of grants awarded in the past three years is just under $2,000, with the smallest grant at $800 and the largest, $3,600, with many requests receiving full funding.”

Application forms and guidelines are available at the VCCF website, www.valleycountycf.net, and at First Community Bank in Glasgow. Hard copy applications are required and they must be postmarked by March 13. Only applications that are complete and received by the due date will be considered.

Funding for the grants comes from earnings on the VCCF endowment. It is invested with the Montana Community Foundation, a statewide organization that helps local communities and non-profit organizations raise and administer charitable gifts.

VCCF is also caretaker for two annual scholarships. The Feda Scholarship for the Trades will be awarded in May and the Charlotte and Clarence Fuhrman Memorial Scholarship will be awarded this summer. Check the VCCF website for application requirements and due dates.

Friday, February 3rd 2017
Montana customers using record amounts of electricity and natural gas to stay warm this winter
Butte, Mont. – February 3, 2017 – Regardless whether the groundhog saw his or her shadow yesterday, Montana has had its fair share of winter weather this season and it’s reflected in customer bills.

So far, winter in our service territory has been colder than normal – 16 percent colder in December and 26 percent colder than normal in January. This is a wide departure from this time last year when the weather started out average and then turned warmer than average in February. Our natural gas and electricity transmission systems, which provides energy to our customers as well as the customers of other energy providers within and adjacent to our territory has kept up with the high demand.

We set a record for natural gas outflows in December 2016 from our storage fields located at the northern and southern points on our system and set an overall record for on-system deliveries to our customers. That system record was subsequently broken the following month in January with a new system record of 6.7 billion cubic feet of delivered natural gas. Our electric system hit a new peak load of 1808 megawatts in mid-December.

This demand is showing up in customer bills as usage increased significantly due to the prolonged and persistent deep cold. Customers are encouraged to look closely at the comparisons provided on their bill that displays usage patterns for the current billing period compared to the previous billing period and the same time last year. The corresponding average daily temperatures over the periods are provided to highlight the correlation between usage and weather.

Recent media coverage about a change to the property tax rate last month as well as a slight monthly change in the supply rates are not the reasons for the significantly higher energy bills many customers are reporting. The total bill is made of delivery, supply and tax rates multiplied by the amount of energy used as measured by a meter, plus a small service charge that covers billing and metering costs.

Customers are also encouraged to call us right away if they are worried about their ability to pay high winter bills. Options ranging from individual payment installment plans to information on how to access emergency bill assistance through federal, state and non-profit sources are available.

Even though usage has caused bills to increase, the overall cost of natural gas remains quite low compared to previous years and NorthWestern’s overall delivered cost of natural gas is about 33 percent lower than the national average.

Friday, February 3rd 2017
Hansen, Stein, Zerbe Receive AAUW Scholarships
Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow on Groundhog's Day, but he also saw three young women deserving some financial recognition for their persistence toward achieving collegiate goals.

The Glasgow branch of the American Association of University Women therefore has chosen these Glasgow High School graduates as scholarship winners.

MADISON HANSEN - $1000. - MSU-Bozeman - Nursing.
Besides stellar academic standing, Madison has been impacted by her volunteerism in VOICE (Victims Options In the Campus Environment.) She is a student advocate for all people affected by domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

MARIAH STEIN - $500. - Black Hills State University - Exercise Science.
Citing that although she has given up playing college softball, Mariah desires to continue that sports interest by becoming an athletic trainer. While still in Bottineau, she helped make hygiene packages for World Relief Center.

TAYLOR ZERBE - $1000. - Biola University - Public Relations.
Taylor's acceptance into the Torrey Honors Program has provided her with many academic challenges and travel opportunities and internships, including to New Zealand for an environmental science program, cut short by the November 7.8 earthquake.

The local university women's group raises these scholarship funds and supports other altruistic activities in the Glasgow area through the annual community bazaar held each November.

Friday, February 3rd 2017
First Hunter Education Classes Offered in Glasgow, for Youth and Adults
(Pictured: a hunter ed graduating class from 2016)

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Hunter Education course dates have been set for the first courses in the Glasgow area for this year. There will be a regular youth classroom course March 6-11, and an adult online “field day” course on March 11. Additional classes will be held in June and August.

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online hunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. This Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.

The adult field course will be held from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. on Saturday, March 11, beginning at the Quonset building at the FWP Headquarters in Glasgow.

For youth, to be eligible to hunt and be fully certified during the 2017 season, hunters must be 12-years old by January 16, 2018. Students aged 10 and 11 can take the course and hunt as an apprentice, but will not be fully certified until the year they turn 12. All registrants for this event must be 10 years of age by March 6.

The youth classroom course will also be held in the Quonset building at the FWP headquarters in Glasgow. Classes will run from 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 7:30-10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 11.

Classroom students need to pick up the Hunter Education Manual from the FWP office in Glasgow. Before students can pick up a manual, however, they must be registered and have printed and signed all necessary forms.

Students are to read each chapter and complete all review sections before class on Thursday, August 25. If workbooks are not complete, students may not be able to continue the course.
To register and learn more about the hunter education classes offered, please go to the FWP website at www.fwp.mt.gov and look under the “Education” tab. If there are any questions, please call the Glasgow FWP office at 228-3700.

Friday, February 3rd 2017
First Bowhunter Education Classes Offered in Glasgow, for Youth and Adults
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Bowhunter Education course dates have been set for the first courses in the Glasgow area for this year. There will be a regular youth classroom course March 3-5, and an adult online “field day” course on March 5.

Starting in 2017, the purchase of a Montana bow and arrow license will be required prior to applying for any archery-only permit. To purchase a bow and arrow license, an individual must meet one of the following requirements:
• show completion of a bowhunter education course
• show proof of purchase of a previous year’s bow and arrow license from Montana or another state
• sign an affidavit that they have previously purchased a bow and arrow license in Montana or another state.

First time archers need to plan ahead so that they have the prerequisite bowhunter education certificate in order to apply for 2017 archery only drawings. The first drawing deadline is March 15 each year.

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online bowhunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. This Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.

The adult field course will be held from 1-5 p.m. on Sunday, March 5, beginning at the Quonset building at the FWP Headquarters in Glasgow.

The youth classroom course will also be held in the Quonset building at the FWP headquarters in Glasgow. Classes will run from 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, and from 8-11 a.m. on Sunday.

All registrants for the classroom course must be 11 years of age by March 3. To hunt during the archery only season, youth need to be at least 12-years old by January 16, 2018.
Classroom students need to pick up the “Today’s Bowhunter” manual from the FWP office in Glasgow. Before students can pick up a manual, however, they must be registered and have printed and signed all necessary forms.


Students are to read each chapter and complete all chapter review exercises before class on Friday, March 3. If workbooks are not complete, students may not be able to continue the course.
To register and learn more about the bowhunter education classes offered, please go to the FWP website at www.fwp.mt.gov and look under the “Education” tab. If there are any questions, please call the Glasgow FWP office at 228-3700.

Wednesday, February 1st 2017
Northwestern Energy Set To Increase Natural Gas And Electrical Rates
Montana regulators say rates for NorthWestern Energy customers are set to rise as the company passes on to consumers a portion of its increased property taxes.

The Public Service Commission on Tuesday declined to take action on the proposed rate increase, allowing it to take effect.

It allows NorthWestern to collect an additional $19.3 million from customers. Rates will increase 5.8 percent for electric service and 3.7 percent for gas service.

PSC members criticized a state law that allows utilities to automatically pass through property tax increases to customers.

Wednesday, February 1st 2017
Alcohol Compliance Checks
The Glasgow Police Department, Valley County Sheriff’s Office and the Valley County DUI Task Force are partnering together to conduct alcohol sales compliance checks. These checks will be conducted at establishments that sell and/or serve alcoholic beverages within Valley County.

Law enforcement officials are running these checks to help businesses avoid liquor law violations and at the same time combat the underage drinking problem that runs throughout Montana.

Over the next few months, trained underage adults will enter these establishments in an attempt to purchase alcoholic beverages. The GPD and VCSO will be working with these youth to conduct the checks. Any staff found selling alcohol to these underage adults will be issued a citation and referred for prosecution.

Businesses and staff are strongly urged to check IDs and refuse service to the underage adults.

Tuesday, January 31st 2017
Glasgow Police Department Reminds Residents To Move Vehicles
The Glasgow Police Department reminds residents that all vehicles and trailers that are parked on city streets must be moved every 5 days per city code 18-62. This allows for street maintenance and snow removal within the city. They appreciate your help and note that prompt compliance will prevent further action.
Tuesday, January 31st 2017
U. S. Fish And Wildlife Service To Hold A Public Open House For Comprehensive Conservation Plan For Charles M. Russell Wetland Management District And Associated Refuges
Beginning in late February, 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold a series of public open houses at various locations in Montana to solicit public input for the development of a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) for the Charles M. Russell Wetland Management District and associated National Wildlife Refuges. The Service encourages everyone with an interest in these significant public resources to participate in this process and help create the vision for future management of the wetland management district and national wildlife refuges.

Meeting dates, times, and locations are:
February 28, Winnett, 5-7 p.m., Petroleum County Courthouse in the conference room/senior center, 302 East Main Street in Winnett, MT 59087.

March 1, Roundup, 5-7 p.m., Montana State University Extension office’s conference room, 204 8th Ave East in Roundup, MT 59072.

March 2, Laurel, 5-7 p.m., Laurel Public Library, 720 West 3rd Street in Laurel, MT 59044.

The meetings will follow an informal open-house format. A brief presentation will be conducted at 6 p.m. each day of the scoping meetings. You are invited to drop by anytime between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to meet with Service personnel, learn more about the CCP process, and provide input. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is committed to providing access to these meetings for all participants. Please direct all requests for sign language interpreting services, close captioning, or other accommodation needs to Toni Griffin, 303/236 4378, Toni_Griffin@fws.gov, TTY 800-877-8339 by February 21, 2017.

?The planning area for this CCP covers the Charles M. Russell Wetland Management District (WMD), which is composed of Golden Valley, Musselshell, Petroleum, Stillwater, and Yellowstone Counties in central Montana. This WMD includes Clark’s Fork, Spidel, and Tew Waterfowl Productions Areas and various Conservation Easements. Grass Lake, Hailstone, Lake Mason, and War Horse National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) are also a part of this CCP effort and fall within the 5 counties of this WMD.

Written comments should be submitted by March 31, 2017 to Charles M. Russell WMD CCP, P.O. Box 110, Lewistown, MT 59457. Email can be submitted to cmr@fws.gov. For more information about the plan call: (406) 538-8706.

The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires that all refuges be managed in accordance with an approved CCP which, when implemented, will achieve refuge purposes; help fulfill the Refuge System mission; maintain and, where appropriate, restore the ecological integrity of each refuge and the Refuge System; help achieve the goals of the Wilderness Preservation System; and meet other mandates. The CCP will guide management decisions and set forth goals, objectives, and strategies to accomplish these tasks. The Service hopes to complete the CCP for Charles M. Russell Wetland Management District and associated National Wildlife Refuges over the next 2 years.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The Service manages the 97-million-acre National Wildlife Refuge System, which encompasses more than 560 national wildlife refuges, thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas. It also operates national fish hatcheries, fishery resources offices and ecological services field stations. The agency enforces federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat such as wetlands, and helps foreign and Native American tribal governments with their conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Assistance program, which distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to state fish and wildlife agencies.

Tuesday, January 31st 2017
Valley County Unemployment Rate At 3.5% In December
Montana’s unemployment rate stayed at 4 percent in December.

That is largely unchanged from November’s figures. The national unemployment rate remained at 5 percent.

Labor and Industry Commissioner Pam Bucy says state residents can look forward to a positive outlook for the economy in the new year.

The report says more construction jobs than usual were added in December, and fewer retail jobs than usual.

In Valley County the unemployment rate was 3.5%. Valley County had a labor force of 4295 with 149 unemployed.

Monday, January 30th 2017
Elk and Deer Special Application Drawing Deadline is March 15; Fishing License Expires Feb. 28
It’s time to start thinking about hunting season again, and getting your new fishing license for the year. Starting Monday, Jan. 23, hunters and anglers can start purchasing licenses for the 2017 year.

Anglers are reminded that their 2016 fishing licenses will expire on Feb. 28.

Hunters are reminded that the deadline for applying for bull and antlerless elk and mule deer buck permits is March 15. The deer and elk permit application packet is available at FWP license providers and online at fwp.mt.gov/hunting/licenses/. The deer and elk permit application packet explains the rules for each hunting district and gives directions for applying. Hunters can apply online, or they may stop in to any FWP office and apply in person.

Prerequisites for applying for these permits include a conservation license, base hunting license and the required elk and/or deer license. And starting this year, the purchase of a Montana bow and arrow license will be required prior to applying for any archery-only permit. To purchase a bow and arrow license, an individual must meet one of the following requirements:

• show completion of a bowhunter education course.
• show proof of purchase of a previous year’s bow and arrow license from Montana or another state.
• sign an affidavit that they have previously purchased a bow and arrow license in Montana or another state.

First time archers need to plan ahead so they have the prerequisite bowhunter education certificate in order to apply for 2017 archery-only drawings. Some archery classes may be available before the March 15 deadline in your area. Please refer to fwp.mt.gov/education/hunter/ to find a class offered near you.

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