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Latest Local News
Saturday, February 18th 2017
Region 6 Hunter Ed Courses
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Hunter Education course dates have been set for many areas across Region 6. All hunter education classes are free of charge. In the next month, classroom courses are being held in:
Havre: starting Feb. 23
Malta: starting Feb. 27
Bainville: starting March 4
Circle: staring March 6
Glasgow: starting March 6
Hinsdale: starting March 6
Scobey: starting March 6
Saco: starting April 3

All students must register online at the FWP website: fwp.mt.gov; click on the education tab, then click “hunter education programs”. Next, “Find a class or field course” and search for the available class in your area. Detailed instructions on dates, times, and other information will be found at each class’ registration page.

For youth to be eligible to hunt and be fully certified during the 2017 season, hunters must be 12-years old by January 16, 2018. Students aged 10 and 11 can take a course and hunt as an apprentice, but will not be fully certified until the year they turn 12. All registrants for these events must be 10 years old by the first day of class.

There are also two adult online field courses being held in the next month:
Havre: Feb. 21
Glasgow: March 12

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online hunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. Adults looking to complete the online course can find instructions at fwp.mt.gov . The Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.

If there are any questions, please call the Glasgow FWP office at 228-3700.

Thursday, February 16th 2017
Residents Removed From Roosevelt Hotel After Revocation Of Occupancy Permit
Officials with the City of Glasgow and other public officials removed residents from the Roosevelt Hotel in Glasgow after the revocation of the occupancy permit of the building.

The revocation of the occupancy permit occurred February 10th after the Glasgow Police Department responded to a complaint of water coming in from the ceiling. The water was leaking from ceiling on third floor of the building and draining into basement and collecting into electrical fixtures.

The Glasgow Police Department and the Glasgow Public Works Department also responded and found several issues with the electrical system in the building. The Roosevelt had been without water service for several days according to city officials.

The resulting actions included revocation of the occupancy permit and the removal of all residents from the building. The Roosevelt had ceased operating as a hotel and had become a long-term boarding house for several Glasgow residents.

Wednesday, February 15th 2017
Mt Legislature considers bill to allow school employees with concealed carry permits to carry handguns on school grounds.
HELENA -- Lawmakers are considering a bill that would allow full-time school employees with concealed carry permits to carry handguns on school grounds.

House Bill 385 would create the Montana Safe Schools Act.

John Moffatt, a volunteer for Moms Demand Action for Gun Safety in America, testified against the bill on Tuesday in front of the House Judiciary Committee

Moffatt was a principal at Fergus High School in Lewistown when he was shot in his abdomen by an active shooter on campus.

“I know absolutely there is nothing I could have done, even had I been armed at that time,” Moffatt said.

Moffatt was joined by 24 others testifying against the bill including mothers, educators and counselors.

“It’s overwhelmingly opposed by the people closest to the situation; the teachers and administrators. Supporters of this legislation have absolutely no skin in the game,” Moffatt said.

President of the Montana Shooting Sports Association Gary Marbut, one of two people who testified for the bill, said he’s taught gun safety to more than 5,000 people and said teachers can be safe with firearms as well.

“If they are sufficiently competent to be entrusted with our children, I absolutely guarantee you that I can train them, or others can train them, to be perfectly safe with firearms,” Marbut said.

Marbut brought up the case of Sandy Hook Elementary School where 20 students and six adults were shot and killed by an armed gunman.

“That the principal died beseeching the assailant to not kill children, but I have to tell that beseeching just did not work. It did not work for her. She died,” Marbut said.

Rep. Seth Berglee, R-Joliet, is the sponsor of the bill and said the bill would create a line of first defense for schools.

“It does make sense in the case of an active shooter, that having individuals in those systems armed would be a good idea and would be effective,” Berglee said.

Moffatt said arming anybody in a scenario like this would not have made his experience any better.

“And being surrounded by screaming, yelling kids, staff members would have added to what was a disastrous situation,” Moffatt said.

Freddy Monares is a reporter with the UM Legislative News Service, a partnership of the University of Montana School of Journalism, the Montana Broadcasters Association and the Greater Montana Foundation.

Wednesday, February 15th 2017
FWP Accepting Comments on Draft EA for Vandalia Wildlife Management Area Grazing Lease Renewal
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is proposing to renew the grazing lease for the Vandalia Wildlife Management Area (WMA) until Sept. 15, 2023. Comments are being sought on the draft environmental assessment (EA) concerning the grazing renewal.

Vandalia WMA is comprised of 310 acres, bordering the south side of the Milk River, and consists of sagebrush grasslands, cottonwood and green ash stands, and wetland and riparian areas. The WMA is located approximately 2.5 miles southeast of Hinsdale. Grazing would continue to be managed under the current rest-rotation grazing system.

The draft EA can be found on the FWP website. A copy of the EA may also be obtained by contacting the FWP Glasgow Regional Office at 406-228-3700 or by emailing dhenry@mt.gov.

The public comment period on the draft EA will extend for 28 days, starting Feb. 15, and comments will be accepted until 5 p.m., March 14, 2017. Comments can be submitted online, emailed to dhenry@mt.gov, or written comments and can be mailed to:

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks
Attn: Vandalia WMA Grazing Lease Renewal
1 Airport Rd.
Glasgow, MT 59230

Tuesday, February 14th 2017
Expiring CRP Workshop
There will be a an Expiring CRP Workshop held at the Cottonwood Inn & Suites on February 24 for producers with CRP expiring September 30th of this year.

The workshop will cover options available to producers after expiration of the contract and is held in conjunction with Natural Resources Conservation Service.

The workshop runs from 10AM to 3PM. Lunch will be provided to those who RSVP.
Please RSVP to Stephanie Viste at the Valley County FSA Office or if you have any questions at 406-228-4321 ext. 108.

Tuesday, February 14th 2017
Tickets Still Available For Saturday’s Hi-Line Sportsmen Banquet
Tickets will be available at the door of Saturday’s Hi-Line Sportsmen fundraising banquet in Glasgow, but in order to guarantee your spot in St. Raphael’s Church parish center, contact a committee member prior to the event.

The Feb. 18 banquet, which features a prime-rib dinner and all the trimmings prepared by the VFW Post 3107 and Ladies Auxiliary, starts at 4:30 p.m. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m. Every admission ticket, regardless of membership level, includes prime-rib dinner and a chance to participate in a number of raffles and live and silent auctions.

Tickets cost $30 for singles, $50 for couples, $200 for sponsor couples, $700 for an 8-seat table; or $800 for an 8-seat sponsor. Sponsors receive an embroidered Hi-Line Sportsmen pull-over and are entered in a drawing for a Winchester SXP 12 gauge shotgun.

In addition to a number of framed prints, home décor items, gift certificates and merchandise donated by local businesses, and various sporting goods, special opportunities such as fishing trips and a dozen guns will be distributed via raffles and auctions.

Firearms, sporting goods, and outdoor opportunities include:
• a Browning X-Bolt in 6.5 Creedmoor, AR-15, Remington Model 700 Long Range in choice of caliber, T/C Venture predator package in choice of caliber, a Stevens 555 over-and-under 12 gauge, Ruger American Rifle with Vortex scope, and a Remington Model 1187 semi-auto shotgun;
• Bear Archery bows;
• Vortex binocular and spotting scope;
• Final entry spot for this summer’s Milk River Catfish Classic;
• A certificate for a Montana Rifle Company X2 rifle in caliber of choice;
• A day of walleye fishing with Ken Schmidt, a day of salmon fishing with Scott Billingsley;
• Gear for bow fishing, fly fishing, kayaking, and other sporting goods;
• Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship Gun, a Henry Golden Boy;
• Plus many, many other items, gift certificates, and gear.

The Hi-Line Sportsmen are dedicated to “keeping conservation local,” working with agencies, landowners, and fellow sportsmen to improve wildlife habitat for a wide range of species, facilitate sportsmen access across Valley County and Northeastern Montana, and promote outdoor recreation opportunities year-round.

For tickets, see any Hi-Line Sportsmen committee member or call Jennifer Jackson at 263-7339. You can also check out the group’s Facebook page for frequent updates.

Monday, February 13th 2017
Glasgow Superintendent Bob Connors Issues Statement Regarding Irle School Lunch Program
This past week, we again had issues at the Irle school concerning our lunch program. A number of our 4th and 5th graders did not receive the main line choice (sloppy joes). The students were allowed to replace the sloppy joes with a peanut butter sandwich or lunch meats from the salad bar. (We did run out of lunch meat, but had peanut butter sandwiches available.) All students had the opportunity to eat lunch.

We have addressed the portion control issue that caused the sloppy joe shortage this past week. As our District kitchen sends the meals to Irle, we have also changed our distribution check out as well as our check in procedures at both sites. We have addressed personnel to inform them of the serious nature of having main line shortages.

I personally apologize. We are, and will continue to evaluate all of the District’s programs.

Monday, February 13th 2017
Ice Fishing Tournament Winners Announced!
The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture held its 19th Annual Ice Fishing Derby at the Dredge Cuts Trout Pond at Fort Peck Lake on February 11, 2017. It was a die-hard day for the fishermen, women & children who chose to participate despite the high wind gusts of 49 mph and nice temperatures of 32 to 37 degrees. The contest had 62 participates and 177 holes were sold. We had participants from Glasgow, Jordan, Poplar, Glendive, Fort Peck, Wolf Point, Brockway, Nashua, Miles City, St. Marie, Belgrade, Billings, Grass Range, Antelope, and Minot, ND. An estimate of 50 more people came to observe the tournament and enjoy the festivities.

A total of $4560.00 in cash, prizes, and raffles were awarded to the participates. The 50/50 was won by Traci Harada in the amount of $640. The Yetti cooler was won by Josh Sillerud. A total of 65 fish were weighed with ten being caught & weighed within the first ten minutes! The results were:
1st Place- $2000- Brad Smudzinski of Fort Peck
2nd Place-$1000-Glasgow Evangelical Church, Glasgow
3rd Place-$ 500-Rick Viste, Glasgow
4th Place-$250-DP Schlosser, Glendive, MT
5th Place- $125-Chris Marrow & Katie Busch of Fort Peck, MT
6th Place- $ 75- Sam & Zac Olson of Fort Peck & Glasgow
7th Place-$50-Levi & Rivers Sugg, Glasgow
The cash prizes were awarded at the Gateway in Fort Peck following the Derby along with several door prizes donated by the Sponsors that consist of: Coca-Cola, Cottonwood Inn & Suites, D&G Sports & Western, Edward Jones, Ezzie’s Wholesale, First Community Bank, Glasgow Distributors, Hi Line Ford, JR’s Party Store, KLTZ/KLAN Radio Stations, Lakeridge, MW Farm Bureau Insurance, Nemont, Nemont Beverage Corp., Newton Motors, Northern Prairie Auto Sales, NorthWestern Energy, Reynolds Market, The Gateway, Tom Thompson & Sons, Valley Bank, and the Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture.

Thursday, February 9th 2017
City Public Works Director Discusses Glasgow Levee
Thursday, February 9th 2017
MSU Native American Student Montana Wilson Wins Prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarship
From MSU News Service

BOZEMAN — Montana Wilson, a Montana State University student from Poplar, has won a Gates Cambridge Scholarship that will fund graduate work at the University of Cambridge in England. Wilson, who is an enrolled Gros Ventre of the Fort Belknap Indian Community and a member of the Assiniboine and Sioux tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, is the first Native American Gates Cambridge Scholar in the history of the scholarship program, according to the Gates Cambridge Trust.

Wilson is one of 36 Americans and 54 scholars from other parts of the world to receive the prestigious scholarship funded by the Gates Foundation. He plans to use the scholarship to earn a master’s degree in development studies at Cambridge.

“This means a lot to me,” Wilson said. “The biggest thing is it has a lot to do with the future work I’m going to do. I have every intention of going into economic development, and this is an amazing opportunity to study at one of the world’s leading universities, in a program that is leading the field in economic development. It will give me the tools to come back and help my tribes and various tribes around the country.”

Wilson is the second MSU student or graduate to receive the scholarship; Hilary Fabich, then a recent MSU graduate, won the scholarship in 2012. The scholarship, which was instituted in 2000 by Bill and Melinda Gates, is similar to the Rhodes Scholarship, but recipients attend Cambridge rather than Oxford, according to Ilse-Mari Lee, dean of the MSU Honors College. Recipients are selected based on outstanding intellectual ability, leadership potential, a commitment to improving the lives of others and a good fit between the applicant's qualifications and aspirations and the postgraduate program at Cambridge for which they are applying.

Wilson is a senior in the Honors College with dual degrees in economics in the College of Agriculture and College of Letters and Science and political science in the College of Letters and Science, and with a minor in Native American studies. While studying at MSU he previously won a prestigious Udall Scholarship from the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation in the Tribal Public Policy category.

“In my frequent conversations with Montana, I have been deeply impressed by his humility, sense of compassion and powerful intellect,” Lee said. “He is destined to lead and serve. It is gratifying to imagine him taking his place within the international community of Gates Cambridge Scholars as they prepare to address the global challenges of the 21st century.”

“Montana represents a new generation of MSU Native students: worldly, savvy, extremely intelligent, but committed to helping tribal communities with the skills, experience and energy they possess,” said Walter Fleming, head of the MSU Department of Native American Studies. “Within Native communities, Montana is well respected as someone who will put all his energies toward success, whether it is running a complex pow wow or helping tutor a friend.”

Wendy Stock, professor in the MSU Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics and one of Wilson’s mentors, noted that his record of leadership and commitment to public service is exceptional.

“Montana’s academic ability, intellectual curiosity, positive attitude in the face of challenges and willingness to work hard, combined with his two majors in economics and political science, will make him a great asset to the Gates Cambridge Scholars program,” Stock said. “Among the thousands of students that I have taught over the past 20-plus years, Montana is easily among the top one percent in terms of intellectual ability, maturity and leadership potential.”

Wilson’s college education began in 2009 at Dartmouth College, where he studied government and entered the Central Intelligence Agency’s Pathways program, a government program established to give students an opportunity to explore federal careers.

As a sophomore, he participated in the global study abroad program Semester at Sea through the University of Virginia, where he encountered life-changing experiences that would steer him toward a new course. One of those occurred after the ship docked in Hong Kong and Wilson traveled to Tibet with a group of students. While there, Wilson said he witnessed a Tibetan monk and nun set themselves on fire in the town square to protest China’s occupation of Tibet.

“As a Native American, I could relate to that feeling of being oppressed,” Wilson said in a 2016 interview with MSU. “That’s what changed what I wanted to do. I realized the CIA was not for me.”

Wilson took a year off from school and returned to his reservation, where he initially interned in the tribes’ public defender’s office. Eventually, he was asked to write motions and briefs for misdemeanor offenses because he had taken a federal Indian law class at Dartmouth. He was so successful that the court administrator suggested he take the Tribal Bar exam as an “educational experience,” Wilson said. He passed the Bar and became a lay advocate for the public defender’s office, eventually winning a lawsuit against a tribal court judge accused of violating juveniles’ rights in her court.

Though he had planned to return to Dartmouth, Wilson accepted a promotion as the

deputy chief prosecutor. He was assigned to adult criminal court and also oversaw juvenile court, arraigning as many as 200 people a week, handling a number of pre-trials, bench and jury trials, and responding to motions.

Being back on the reservation led Wilson to reconnect with his culture and take on more tribal responsibilities. Four years ago, he decided to forgo Dartmouth and enroll instead at nearby MSU.

“I decided Dartmouth was no longer my fit,” he said. “I found out classes at MSU, especially in economics, were comparable to my classes at Dartmouth.”

And, he said, his experience at MSU has been “really awesome” because of the level that he has gotten to know his professors.

“I’m in four different academic programs here, and I have really close ties to professors in all four programs,” Wilson said.

In particular, he credits mentors Stock and Linda Young, head of the Department of Political Science, as well as Lee, with helping him make the most of his education and achieve his goals.

After completing his degree at Cambridge, Wilson plans to come back to Montana to help his tribes. His career goal is to head his tribes’ economic development office, although he says there are other things his tribes are interested in having him help them accomplish, as well, and he is open to working where he is most needed.

“I plan to help with issues that (the tribes) prioritize as something they want dealt with,” Wilson said.

“It’s such a huge honor to be able to go to Cambridge, and really I’m doing it for my tribes,” Wilson added. “The hope of this is that other Native students who come to MSU from my reservation and from other reservations can see that they can accomplish their goals, as well.”

Wednesday, February 8th 2017
First Annual Hi-Line Sportsmen Banquet Is February 18
Catfish Classic entry, guns galore, sporting goods, and home décor on the block at 1st annual Hi-Line Sportsmen banquet Feb. 18

You can bid on the final entry in the Milk River Catfish Classic, win a hunting rifle, buy framed art and other home décor, or win all sorts of premium sporting goods. But you can’t do any of that if you’re not at the Hi-Line Sportsmen first-annual fundraising banquet on Saturday night, Feb. 18.

The banquet, which features a prime-rib dinner and all the trimmings prepared by the VFW Post 3107 and Ladies Auxiliary, starts at 4:30 p.m. at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church parish center in Glasgow. Dinner will begin at 6 p.m.

Prizes will be distributed on games of chance, raffles, and both silent and live auctions. Items on the block at the banquet include:

· 11 guns that will be given to winners of several games of chance. Firearms include a Browning X-Bolt in 6.5 Creedmoor, AR-15, Remington Model 700 Long Range in choice of caliber, T/C Venture predator package in choice of caliber, a Stevens 555 over-and-under 12 gauge, Ruger American Rifle with Vortex scope, and a Remington Model 1187 semi-auto shotgun, among several others;
· Bear Archery bows;
· Vortex binocular and spotting scope;
· Framed wildlife-art prints;
· Makita tool kit, air compressor, stainless steel rolling workbench, space heater, and fireplace entertainment center with 49-inch TV;
· Last entry spot for this summer’s Milk River Catfish Classic;
· A certificate for a Montana Rifle Company X2 rifle in caliber of choice;
· A day of walleye fishing with Ken Schmidt, a day of guided salmon fishing with Scott Billingsley;
· Gear for bow fishing, fly fishing, kayaking, and other sporting goods;
· Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship Gun, a Henry Golden Boy;
· Plus many, many other items, gift certificates, and gear donated by local businesses

Tickets are still available. Cost is $30 for singles, $50 for couples, $200 for sponsor couples, $700 for a table for eight; or $800 for a sponsor table for eight. Sponsors receive two meals, a gift, and are entered in a drawing for a Winchester SXP 12 gauge shotgun.

For tickets, see any Hi-Line Sportsmen committee member or call Jennifer Jackson at 263-7339. You can also check out the group’s Facebook page for frequent updates.

Wednesday, February 8th 2017
Senator Mike Lang introduces legislation that would bar people owing child support from getting hunting licenses
HELENA - Under a bill in the Montana Legislature, people who owe child support in Montana could be barred from buying a hunting, fishing, or trapping license.

“I had a guy that came up to me and he said I don’t like your bill. I’m not paying my child support now because my wife wouldn’t let me see the children,” said Sen. Mike Lang, R-Malta, who is carrying Senate Bill 172. “OK, so I said, ‘well she was bad, now you’re creating another bad, who’s really losing here? The kids are losing.’”

Lang said the bill is needed because there are currently 33,144 cases of child support enforcement that are in arrears in Montana, and that those cases have accumulated a debt of a little over $147 million. Lang said his bill should lower these numbers.

Committee member Sen. Jennifer Fielder, R-Thompson Falls, said she has concerns with the bill, especially if hunting rights are stripped away from someone who provides meat for their families for sustenance rather than hunting for sport.

“I’m really concerned that we’re actually not helping families, we’re actually going to be making it worse for some families,” Fielder said.

No opponents testified at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday morning and the committee did not immediately vote on the bill.

Cole Grant is a reporter with the UM Legislative News Service, a partnership of the University of Montana School of Journalism, the Montana Broadcasters Association and the Greater Montana Foundation.

Tuesday, February 7th 2017
Jay Witkowski Charged With Deliberate Homicide
28-year old Jay Witkowski has been charged with deliberate homicide in the death of Glasgow resident Evelynn Garcia. Witkowski is currently incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center and has been since his arrest on December 31st. Bond has been set a $1 million dollars.
According to court documents, Evelynn Garcia was discovered lying semi-conscious in the north bound lane on Montana Highway #24 east of Glasgow on December 31st. Garcia was discovered at 6:50pm.

At 7:43pm that same evening, law enforcement was notified that a man had shown up at a Valley County residence claiming that someone had tried to carjack his vehicle and tried to stab him. When law enforcement arrived they determined the man was Jay Witkowski. He claimed that he had been confronted by 4 large men while in his vehicle with Garcia. An altercation occurred and one of the alleged assailants had a knife and Garcia was stabbed. Witkowski claimed he got away from the assailants and drove away in his vehicle. When law enforcement asked Witkowski where Garcia was, he stated Evelynn was probably in the road where he had left her. Witkowski told law enforcement that he had come to Glasgow to pick up Garcia and take her to Billings.

Witkowski was arrested by the Valley County Sheriff’s Office. Garcia was transported by air ambulance to Billings where she died on January 3rd. Witkowski was initially charged with assault with a weapon, aggravated assault and criminal endangerment. When Garcia passed away it was expected that Witkowski would be charged with deliberate homicide and that charged was filed against him on February 6th.

According to court documents, investigators found blood evidence in Witkowski’s vehicle that indicated Garcia was stabbed while seated in the passenger side of the vehicle. An autopsy indicated that Garcia was stabbed on the left side of her body and her clothing was soaked in blood. Investigators also observed a large amount of blood where Garcia may have received a blow to the back of her head. Law enforcement also found a tire iron with Garcia’s blood on it.

An autopsy indicated that Garcia’s cause of death was stab wounds and blunt force trauma to the head resulting in a skull fracture. Garcia had stab wounds on her left arm, hand, throat and on her chest.

The vehicle driven by Witkowski also had a shattered windshield and he has claimed that he hit one of the alleged assailants with his vehicle and that is why the windshield was shattered. Court documents state that Garcia’s blood was found on the front of the vehicle, hood, roof, trunk and passenger side of the vehicle. An investigator from the Montana Highway Patrol has stated that while Garcia might have been struck by the vehicle he does not believe the fatal head injuries occurred as a result of a collision with the vehicle driven by Witkowski.

Law enforcement is stating in court documents that there is no evidence at this time to indicate that anyone other when Witkowski was at the location where Garcia was assaulted and subsequently found on December 31st.


Monday, February 6th 2017
Governor Bullock Announces Grant Funding For Enhancement Of Tourism Infrastructure In Montana
MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock today announced $316,314 in funding for development and enhancement of tourism infrastructure in 11 Montana communities.

“Montana’s tourism economy is strong and growing, attracting millions of folks from across the world to enjoy our public lands and wide open spaces,” said Governor Steve Bullock. “These funds help our communities increase the economic impact of tourism and take advantage of innovative new marketing opportunities.”

The funds are being made available through the Montana Department of Commerce, Office of Tourism and Business Development Tourism Grant Program. The program awards funds to projects that strengthen Montana’s economy through the development and enhancement of the state’s tourism industry. The program offers funding in three categories: tourism digital development, tourism infrastructure and tourism event paid media advertising.

Full List of Grant Recipients:

McCone County received $2,000 from the Digital Development category to add an outdoor security system to the McCone County Museum in Circle.

Montana Dude Ranchers Association of Helena received $3,766 from the Digital Development category for visitor-related website upgrades.

Teton County Development Organization received $14,000 from the Digital Development category for visitor-related website upgrades in Choteau.

The City of Cut Bank received $99,687 from the Infrastructure category to add a roof to its city park pavilion.

The City of Forsyth received $1,150 from the Infrastructure category for Custer Circle historic trail signage.

Great Falls Tourism received $20,000 from the Infrastructure category for installation of new digital displays and facility improvements in the visitor information center.

Great Plains Dinosaur Museum of Malta received $4,919 from the Infrastructure category for new exhibit and prep area construction.

Last Chance Tour Train of Helena received $34,183 from the Infrastructure category for tour train repairs.

Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana of Charlo received $28,338 from the Infrastructure category to replace its HVAC system.

The Roxy Theater of Missoula received $67,605 from the Infrastructure category for historic preservation of the building’s façade.

The Wheatland Chamber of Commerce received $40,666 from the Infrastructure category for enhancements to Chief Joseph Park in Harlowton, including new bike facilities and electrical upgrades to the RV parking area.
Monday, February 6th 2017
Applications now available for this year’s VCCF grants
The Valley County Community Foundation will award its annual grants this spring, grant committee chair Sam Waters announced this week.

VCCF provides grants to local organizations with the charitable 501(c) 3 IRS designation and local government projects. Specifically, VCCF awards grants in these areas: arts and culture, basic human needs, economic development, education, and natural resources and conservation. Projects in all parts of Valley County have received grants, Waters said, adding that over the years, competition for grant dollars has increased.

“Time spent on the application is time well spent,” Waters said. “The average dollar amount of grants awarded in the past three years is just under $2,000, with the smallest grant at $800 and the largest, $3,600, with many requests receiving full funding.”

Application forms and guidelines are available at the VCCF website, www.valleycountycf.net, and at First Community Bank in Glasgow. Hard copy applications are required and they must be postmarked by March 13. Only applications that are complete and received by the due date will be considered.

Funding for the grants comes from earnings on the VCCF endowment. It is invested with the Montana Community Foundation, a statewide organization that helps local communities and non-profit organizations raise and administer charitable gifts.

VCCF is also caretaker for two annual scholarships. The Feda Scholarship for the Trades will be awarded in May and the Charlotte and Clarence Fuhrman Memorial Scholarship will be awarded this summer. Check the VCCF website for application requirements and due dates.

Friday, February 3rd 2017
Montana customers using record amounts of electricity and natural gas to stay warm this winter
Butte, Mont. – February 3, 2017 – Regardless whether the groundhog saw his or her shadow yesterday, Montana has had its fair share of winter weather this season and it’s reflected in customer bills.

So far, winter in our service territory has been colder than normal – 16 percent colder in December and 26 percent colder than normal in January. This is a wide departure from this time last year when the weather started out average and then turned warmer than average in February. Our natural gas and electricity transmission systems, which provides energy to our customers as well as the customers of other energy providers within and adjacent to our territory has kept up with the high demand.

We set a record for natural gas outflows in December 2016 from our storage fields located at the northern and southern points on our system and set an overall record for on-system deliveries to our customers. That system record was subsequently broken the following month in January with a new system record of 6.7 billion cubic feet of delivered natural gas. Our electric system hit a new peak load of 1808 megawatts in mid-December.

This demand is showing up in customer bills as usage increased significantly due to the prolonged and persistent deep cold. Customers are encouraged to look closely at the comparisons provided on their bill that displays usage patterns for the current billing period compared to the previous billing period and the same time last year. The corresponding average daily temperatures over the periods are provided to highlight the correlation between usage and weather.

Recent media coverage about a change to the property tax rate last month as well as a slight monthly change in the supply rates are not the reasons for the significantly higher energy bills many customers are reporting. The total bill is made of delivery, supply and tax rates multiplied by the amount of energy used as measured by a meter, plus a small service charge that covers billing and metering costs.

Customers are also encouraged to call us right away if they are worried about their ability to pay high winter bills. Options ranging from individual payment installment plans to information on how to access emergency bill assistance through federal, state and non-profit sources are available.

Even though usage has caused bills to increase, the overall cost of natural gas remains quite low compared to previous years and NorthWestern’s overall delivered cost of natural gas is about 33 percent lower than the national average.

Friday, February 3rd 2017
Hansen, Stein, Zerbe Receive AAUW Scholarships
Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow on Groundhog's Day, but he also saw three young women deserving some financial recognition for their persistence toward achieving collegiate goals.

The Glasgow branch of the American Association of University Women therefore has chosen these Glasgow High School graduates as scholarship winners.

MADISON HANSEN - $1000. - MSU-Bozeman - Nursing.
Besides stellar academic standing, Madison has been impacted by her volunteerism in VOICE (Victims Options In the Campus Environment.) She is a student advocate for all people affected by domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

MARIAH STEIN - $500. - Black Hills State University - Exercise Science.
Citing that although she has given up playing college softball, Mariah desires to continue that sports interest by becoming an athletic trainer. While still in Bottineau, she helped make hygiene packages for World Relief Center.

TAYLOR ZERBE - $1000. - Biola University - Public Relations.
Taylor's acceptance into the Torrey Honors Program has provided her with many academic challenges and travel opportunities and internships, including to New Zealand for an environmental science program, cut short by the November 7.8 earthquake.

The local university women's group raises these scholarship funds and supports other altruistic activities in the Glasgow area through the annual community bazaar held each November.

Friday, February 3rd 2017
First Hunter Education Classes Offered in Glasgow, for Youth and Adults
(Pictured: a hunter ed graduating class from 2016)

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Hunter Education course dates have been set for the first courses in the Glasgow area for this year. There will be a regular youth classroom course March 6-11, and an adult online “field day” course on March 11. Additional classes will be held in June and August.

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online hunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. This Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.

The adult field course will be held from 8 a.m.-12 p.m. on Saturday, March 11, beginning at the Quonset building at the FWP Headquarters in Glasgow.

For youth, to be eligible to hunt and be fully certified during the 2017 season, hunters must be 12-years old by January 16, 2018. Students aged 10 and 11 can take the course and hunt as an apprentice, but will not be fully certified until the year they turn 12. All registrants for this event must be 10 years of age by March 6.

The youth classroom course will also be held in the Quonset building at the FWP headquarters in Glasgow. Classes will run from 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, and from 7:30-10:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 11.

Classroom students need to pick up the Hunter Education Manual from the FWP office in Glasgow. Before students can pick up a manual, however, they must be registered and have printed and signed all necessary forms.

Students are to read each chapter and complete all review sections before class on Thursday, August 25. If workbooks are not complete, students may not be able to continue the course.
To register and learn more about the hunter education classes offered, please go to the FWP website at www.fwp.mt.gov and look under the “Education” tab. If there are any questions, please call the Glasgow FWP office at 228-3700.

Friday, February 3rd 2017
First Bowhunter Education Classes Offered in Glasgow, for Youth and Adults
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Bowhunter Education course dates have been set for the first courses in the Glasgow area for this year. There will be a regular youth classroom course March 3-5, and an adult online “field day” course on March 5.

Starting in 2017, the purchase of a Montana bow and arrow license will be required prior to applying for any archery-only permit. To purchase a bow and arrow license, an individual must meet one of the following requirements:
• show completion of a bowhunter education course
• show proof of purchase of a previous year’s bow and arrow license from Montana or another state
• sign an affidavit that they have previously purchased a bow and arrow license in Montana or another state.

First time archers need to plan ahead so that they have the prerequisite bowhunter education certificate in order to apply for 2017 archery only drawings. The first drawing deadline is March 15 each year.

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online bowhunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. This Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.

The adult field course will be held from 1-5 p.m. on Sunday, March 5, beginning at the Quonset building at the FWP Headquarters in Glasgow.

The youth classroom course will also be held in the Quonset building at the FWP headquarters in Glasgow. Classes will run from 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, and from 8-11 a.m. on Sunday.

All registrants for the classroom course must be 11 years of age by March 3. To hunt during the archery only season, youth need to be at least 12-years old by January 16, 2018.
Classroom students need to pick up the “Today’s Bowhunter” manual from the FWP office in Glasgow. Before students can pick up a manual, however, they must be registered and have printed and signed all necessary forms.


Students are to read each chapter and complete all chapter review exercises before class on Friday, March 3. If workbooks are not complete, students may not be able to continue the course.
To register and learn more about the bowhunter education classes offered, please go to the FWP website at www.fwp.mt.gov and look under the “Education” tab. If there are any questions, please call the Glasgow FWP office at 228-3700.

Wednesday, February 1st 2017
Northwestern Energy Set To Increase Natural Gas And Electrical Rates
Montana regulators say rates for NorthWestern Energy customers are set to rise as the company passes on to consumers a portion of its increased property taxes.

The Public Service Commission on Tuesday declined to take action on the proposed rate increase, allowing it to take effect.

It allows NorthWestern to collect an additional $19.3 million from customers. Rates will increase 5.8 percent for electric service and 3.7 percent for gas service.

PSC members criticized a state law that allows utilities to automatically pass through property tax increases to customers.

Wednesday, February 1st 2017
Alcohol Compliance Checks
The Glasgow Police Department, Valley County Sheriff’s Office and the Valley County DUI Task Force are partnering together to conduct alcohol sales compliance checks. These checks will be conducted at establishments that sell and/or serve alcoholic beverages within Valley County.

Law enforcement officials are running these checks to help businesses avoid liquor law violations and at the same time combat the underage drinking problem that runs throughout Montana.

Over the next few months, trained underage adults will enter these establishments in an attempt to purchase alcoholic beverages. The GPD and VCSO will be working with these youth to conduct the checks. Any staff found selling alcohol to these underage adults will be issued a citation and referred for prosecution.

Businesses and staff are strongly urged to check IDs and refuse service to the underage adults.

Tuesday, January 31st 2017
Glasgow Police Department Reminds Residents To Move Vehicles
The Glasgow Police Department reminds residents that all vehicles and trailers that are parked on city streets must be moved every 5 days per city code 18-62. This allows for street maintenance and snow removal within the city. They appreciate your help and note that prompt compliance will prevent further action.
Tuesday, January 31st 2017
U. S. Fish And Wildlife Service To Hold A Public Open House For Comprehensive Conservation Plan For Charles M. Russell Wetland Management District And Associated Refuges
Beginning in late February, 2017, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold a series of public open houses at various locations in Montana to solicit public input for the development of a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) for the Charles M. Russell Wetland Management District and associated National Wildlife Refuges. The Service encourages everyone with an interest in these significant public resources to participate in this process and help create the vision for future management of the wetland management district and national wildlife refuges.

Meeting dates, times, and locations are:
February 28, Winnett, 5-7 p.m., Petroleum County Courthouse in the conference room/senior center, 302 East Main Street in Winnett, MT 59087.

March 1, Roundup, 5-7 p.m., Montana State University Extension office’s conference room, 204 8th Ave East in Roundup, MT 59072.

March 2, Laurel, 5-7 p.m., Laurel Public Library, 720 West 3rd Street in Laurel, MT 59044.

The meetings will follow an informal open-house format. A brief presentation will be conducted at 6 p.m. each day of the scoping meetings. You are invited to drop by anytime between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to meet with Service personnel, learn more about the CCP process, and provide input. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is committed to providing access to these meetings for all participants. Please direct all requests for sign language interpreting services, close captioning, or other accommodation needs to Toni Griffin, 303/236 4378, Toni_Griffin@fws.gov, TTY 800-877-8339 by February 21, 2017.

?The planning area for this CCP covers the Charles M. Russell Wetland Management District (WMD), which is composed of Golden Valley, Musselshell, Petroleum, Stillwater, and Yellowstone Counties in central Montana. This WMD includes Clark’s Fork, Spidel, and Tew Waterfowl Productions Areas and various Conservation Easements. Grass Lake, Hailstone, Lake Mason, and War Horse National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) are also a part of this CCP effort and fall within the 5 counties of this WMD.

Written comments should be submitted by March 31, 2017 to Charles M. Russell WMD CCP, P.O. Box 110, Lewistown, MT 59457. Email can be submitted to cmr@fws.gov. For more information about the plan call: (406) 538-8706.

The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires that all refuges be managed in accordance with an approved CCP which, when implemented, will achieve refuge purposes; help fulfill the Refuge System mission; maintain and, where appropriate, restore the ecological integrity of each refuge and the Refuge System; help achieve the goals of the Wilderness Preservation System; and meet other mandates. The CCP will guide management decisions and set forth goals, objectives, and strategies to accomplish these tasks. The Service hopes to complete the CCP for Charles M. Russell Wetland Management District and associated National Wildlife Refuges over the next 2 years.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. The Service manages the 97-million-acre National Wildlife Refuge System, which encompasses more than 560 national wildlife refuges, thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas. It also operates national fish hatcheries, fishery resources offices and ecological services field stations. The agency enforces federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat such as wetlands, and helps foreign and Native American tribal governments with their conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Assistance program, which distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to state fish and wildlife agencies.

Tuesday, January 31st 2017
Valley County Unemployment Rate At 3.5% In December
Montana’s unemployment rate stayed at 4 percent in December.

That is largely unchanged from November’s figures. The national unemployment rate remained at 5 percent.

Labor and Industry Commissioner Pam Bucy says state residents can look forward to a positive outlook for the economy in the new year.

The report says more construction jobs than usual were added in December, and fewer retail jobs than usual.

In Valley County the unemployment rate was 3.5%. Valley County had a labor force of 4295 with 149 unemployed.

Monday, January 30th 2017
Elk and Deer Special Application Drawing Deadline is March 15; Fishing License Expires Feb. 28
It’s time to start thinking about hunting season again, and getting your new fishing license for the year. Starting Monday, Jan. 23, hunters and anglers can start purchasing licenses for the 2017 year.

Anglers are reminded that their 2016 fishing licenses will expire on Feb. 28.

Hunters are reminded that the deadline for applying for bull and antlerless elk and mule deer buck permits is March 15. The deer and elk permit application packet is available at FWP license providers and online at fwp.mt.gov/hunting/licenses/. The deer and elk permit application packet explains the rules for each hunting district and gives directions for applying. Hunters can apply online, or they may stop in to any FWP office and apply in person.

Prerequisites for applying for these permits include a conservation license, base hunting license and the required elk and/or deer license. And starting this year, the purchase of a Montana bow and arrow license will be required prior to applying for any archery-only permit. To purchase a bow and arrow license, an individual must meet one of the following requirements:

• show completion of a bowhunter education course.
• show proof of purchase of a previous year’s bow and arrow license from Montana or another state.
• sign an affidavit that they have previously purchased a bow and arrow license in Montana or another state.

First time archers need to plan ahead so they have the prerequisite bowhunter education certificate in order to apply for 2017 archery-only drawings. Some archery classes may be available before the March 15 deadline in your area. Please refer to fwp.mt.gov/education/hunter/ to find a class offered near you.

Thursday, January 26th 2017
Hovland Family Remembered With Gift To GHS Educational Trust
Although Lynn (Hovland) Logslett-Hembree spent most of her adult life in the state of Washington, it is clear from her bequest to the Glasgow High School Educational Trust that a large part of her heart never left the northeastern Montana prairie, her beloved family, or her alma mater behind. On her passing, June 26, 2013, Logslett-Hembree bequeathed her home in the Tacoma area to the GHS Educational Trust. It was recently sold, and the proceeds transferred to the corpus of the trust, so future earnings could help finance the higher education of Glasgow High School graduates. As a result of her generosity, the first gift of financial aid to a GHS graduate attending college or trade school in memory of the Hovland Family will be made next summer for the 2017-2018 academic year, and a gift will be made in its name every year thereafter in perpetuity.

Logslett-Hembree was born in Nashua, Montana, in 1924, to John and Mabel Hovland. John Hovland had come to Larslan, Montana, from Minnesota with his brothers Olaf and Julius to homestead in 1916. Mabel (Malingen) Hovland was also from Minnesota, and married John in 1920. They continued to farm in the Larslan area and together had six children: Richard Hovland, Merlin Hovland, Jeanette Hovland Corey, LaVonne (Hovland) McFarland, Lynn (Hovland) Logslett-Hembree, and Doris (Hovland) Maag, a long-time Glasgow resident. When John died in 1932, reportedly from the effects of gas he was subjected to during World War I, Mabel Hovland raised the children on her own, working at the Richland School Dormitory as a housemother and cook for a time, in addition to maintaining the family farm during the Great Depression. In 1938, the family moved to Glasgow, and the children enrolled in local schools.

Lynn (Hovland) Logslett-Hembree graduated from Glasgow High School in 1941. During her senior year, she was allowed to work at a local bank as part of her education; it was the beginning of a long and very successful career in banking. After graduation, she attended a business school in Spokane, Washington, and following completion of her studies there was employed at Idaho First National Bank in Coeur d’ Alene, Idaho.

In 1942, she met Jack Hembree at the Coeur d’ Alene USO. He was a hospital corpsman stationed at Farragut Naval Training Base. They were separated by the War in 1944, and did not see each other again until 1999.

Lynn (Hovland) Logslett-Hembree married a local contractor, Don Logslett, in 1950, settled in the Seattle area, and continued her career in banking. She eventually became the first female Vice-President of Puget Sound National Bank, a position she held until her retirement.

Jack Hembree and his wife and Lynn (Hovland) Logslett and her husband renewed their friendship in 1999 for the first time since the War. Shortly after, in March of 2000, Lynn’s husband died, and three weeks later, Jack’s wife died. In August of 2000, Lynn and Jack were married, both 76 years old at the time, and together they enjoyed a loving relationship for 13 years. In a recent letter to the trust about his late wife, Jack Hembree wrote, “Lynn was a practical woman and a strong advocate of continuing education, and she wished to thank all and show her appreciation for the help she received during her career. I am happy to follow her wishes. “

The Glasgow High School Educational Trust was established in 1964 by the GHS Class of 1938. Since its inception, gifts of cash, stock, and real estate have grown the corpus of the trust to over $5 million dollars in value. The earnings on those assets are used to award financial aid to GHS graduates pursuing college or trade school through a semi-annual application process administered by the Board of Trustees. Application deadlines are July 1st and October 15th of each year. Applicants may apply for assistance for both semesters of the school year or for the spring semester only. All application requirements must be met and the application submitted on time to qualify. Students may reapply over the course of their academic careers, and the majority of the recipients do so. To date, the trust has awarded $1,842,000 in financial aid to hundreds of different students attending colleges and trade schools across the nation. The application and further information about the trust are available here.

In addition to the grants given to students, the Glasgow High School Educational Trust also purchases equipment and programs for GHS that cannot be financed within the regular budget. These gifts benefit all students and the public at large when they attend events at GHS or use its facilities. A total of 111 gifts have been made to GHS across all departments. The total dollar amount of the trust’s purchases for GHS to date is $223,179.42.

Whenever the trust receives donations in the name of a particular individual that total $500 or more, a gift to a student or GHS is given in honor, recognition, or memory of that individual. Donations of $10,000 or more in the name of a particular individual entitle the donor to an annual naming opportunity in perpetuity.

The Glasgow High School Educational Trust gratefully acknowledges the investment Lynn (Hovland) Logslett-Hembree has made in the students of Glasgow High School and in the betterment of this community, in memory of her family.

At its recent semi-annual meeting the trust awarded the following gifts for the Spring 2017 semester only:

First time recipient: Jake Hentges, MSU-Northern- IMO Vernon C. Anderson

Second time recipient: Megan Dailey, Dickinson State University- IHO Gary & Jean Buer Mott.

Tuesday, January 24th 2017
President Trump Expected To Take Executive Action To Advance Construction Of Keystone XL Pipeline
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is expected to take executive action Tuesday to advance construction of the Keystone XL and Dakota Access oil pipelines, according to multiple news reports and a source with knowledge of the action.

The president is scheduled to sign orders at the White House late this morning.

Former President Barack Obama killed the proposed Keystone XL pipeline in late 2015, declaring it would have undercut U.S. efforts to clinch a global climate change deal that was a centerpiece of his environmental legacy. The pipeline would run from Canada to U.S. refineries in the Gulf Coast. The U.S. government needed to approve the pipeline because it crossed the border.

AdvertisementThe Army decided last year to explore alternate routes for the Dakota pipeline after the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and its supporters said the pipeline threatened drinking water and Native American cultural sites.

Tuesday, January 24th 2017
Glasgow Residents Reminded That City Ordinance Prohibits Depositing Snow From Private Property Onto Streets And Alleys
Residents please be reminded that under City Ordinance Section 17-23 it is unlawful to deposit any accumulation of snow, ice, and/or slush from private property onto streets or alleys.

-The purpose for this this ordinance is not only to aid with snow melt storm water run-off, but to also help City snow removal crews as well as keeping the street clear for Emergency Services access and your neighbors who also utilize the street. Thank you observing ordinance!
Tuesday, January 24th 2017
Glasgow Woman Facing Felony Charge Of Exploitation Of Older Person
Glasgow resident, Karla Nix, was arrested last week by the Glasgow Police Department and charged with felony exploitation of an older person.

According to Glasgow Police Chief Bruce Barstad, the investigation revealed that from 2014-2016, Nix allegedly physically and financially abused a 93-year old resident of Nemont Manor in Glasgow.

Bond has been set at $5000 and Nix was incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center as of Monday afternoon.

The victim in the case has been relocated to another community according to Chief Barstad.

The investigation was conducted by the Glasgow Police Department.

Tuesday, January 24th 2017
Governor Bullock Announces State Unemployment Rate Holding Steady At 4.0 Percent
Governor Steve Bullock today announced Montana’s unemployment rate held steady at 4.0 percent over the month of December after dropping by 0.3 percentage points in November. The national unemployment rate increased slightly by 0.1 percentage points to 4.7 percent.

“Montana continues to outperform much of the nation, holding steady at near-historic low levels of unemployment for over a year,” said Governor Bullock. “As we continue to build on our economic strength and create a business climate that attracts, retains, and grows businesses, we’re making it easier for employers all across Montana to create more good-paying jobs.”

Montana’s economy added over 4,000 payroll jobs in the 4th quarter of 2016 from the prior quarter, with gains in construction, manufacturing, and leisure activities industries. Total employment estimates, which include the self-employed and agricultural employment in addition to payroll employment, indicated an over-the-month gain of roughly 500 jobs, with 4th quarter growth of 2,400 jobs over the prior quarter.

“Montanans are starting 2017 with a strong economy that is anticipated to grow in the upcoming year,” said Montana Labor & Industry Commissioner Pam Bucy. “As a result of a strengthening economy and recovering natural resources prices, we expect to see increased growth in rural communities, more Montanans earning higher wages, and more opportunities to fill jobs in high-skilled areas.”

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased in December by 0.3 percent, led by price increases for gasoline and housing. Over the last twelve months, the CPI-U rose 2.1 percent before seasonal adjustment. Core inflation, measured by the all items less food and energy index, rose 0.2 percent over the month.

Monday, January 23rd 2017
Job Service Employers’ Committee Looking For Scholarship Donations
Dear Area Businesses and Interested Persons,

The Glasgow Job Service Employers’ Committee (JSEC) offers $1,000 in scholarships each year to Valley County students pursuing training immediately after high school. As an effort to improve our work-force, we are asking you to contribute to this scholarship fund.

Students can use the funds toward school related costs for any type of training. This includes short term or long term programs, technical fields, the trades or the arts. Scholarship winners are chosen based on their plans, financial need and determination.

According to the Montana Department of Labor and Industry 2015 Labor Day Report to the Governor, there a more educated workforce will be needed in the next ten years. Education beyond high school typically provides more opportunities for employment as well as increased earning potential.

We hope you will join other employers in the county by donating toward the JSEC Scholarship this year. Our goal is to raise at least $1,000 which would directly fund two or three scholarships.

Contributions can be sent to:
Glasgow JSEC, c/o Stacey Amundson, 319 3rd Street South, Glasgow Montana 59230. All donations are tax deductible and a receipt will be issued upon request. Please call me with any questions, (406) 228-2476 Ext. 1. Thank you in advance for your support!

Sincerely,
Stacey Amundson
Glasgow JSEC Chair


Job Service Employer Committee Scholarship 2017


____$25 ____$50 ____$100 $________ amount of your choice

Friday, January 20th 2017
Valley County Commissioners Vote To Downsize Voting Precincts In Valley County
The Valley County Commissioners voted unanimously to downsize the number of voting precincts in Valley County beginning in the election year of 2018.

There were 8 precincts in Valley County including Nashua, Opheim, Lustre, Hinsdale, Fort Peck, Frazer and 2 Glasgow precincts but the Valley County Election Administrator will now reduce those 8 precincts to just 3.

The precincts will be aligned according to how the House Districts are aligned in Valley County for the Montana Legislature. There are currently 3 House Districts in Valley County.

All voting on election day will now take place in Glasgow at the Glasgow Civic Center. There will no longer be election day voting in the outlying areas of Valley County.

Friday, January 20th 2017
Public Hearing Held for No-Wake Zone in Park Grove and Duck Creek Bay
The Fish and Wildlife Commission has asked Fish, Wildlife and Parks to hold a public hearing on the petitioned no-wake zones for Park Grove and Duck Creek Bay at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017. The hearing will be held at the Fort Peck Multi-Species Fish Hatchery in Fort Peck to collect public comments on these proposals.

A petition was received requesting to restrict the Bay of Park Grove, located in the Fort Peck Dredge Cuts, to a no-wake zone approximately 75 feet from the shoreline. The request was made to address safety concerns, shoreline damage, and disruption of both animal activity and non-motorized user activity.

A separate petition was received requesting to restrict Duck Creek Bay, located on Fort Peck Reservoir, to a limited no-wake zone from the boat ramp to the mouth of the bay. The request was made to address both safety concerns and property damage, as the area has a heavily-used boat ramp and camping area.

The public hearing format consists of (in order): a brief overview on the topic, a question and answer period to address any questions about what is being proposed or the rulemaking process, and time for public comment.

Public attendees at the hearing may submit their comments either orally or in writing at the hearing. Written comments may also be submitted to: Ron Howell, FWP Region 6 Office, 1 Airport Rd., Glasgow, MT 59230, or e-mail rhowell@mt.gov. Comments must be received no later than Feb. 17, 2017.

FWP ensures that its meetings are fully accessible to persons with disabilities. To request special accommodations for this meeting, please contact 406-228-3700.

Friday, January 20th 2017
Valley County Health Department Warns Of Flu Increase
There is a significant increase of reported positive influenza in Valley County. Remember, your best defense against illness is good hand washing habits, stay home when you are ill and get a flu shot.

Valley County Health Department is open 7:30am - 6:00pm Monday to Thursday. It is not to late to get immunized against the flu!

Wednesday, January 18th 2017
City of Glasgow Moves Forward With Water System Improvements
The Glasgow City Council voted on Tuesday to approve a contract with the engineering firm of Morrison-Maierle for services for water system improvements in the city of Glasgow.

Morrison-Maierle will design a complete retrofit of the city water treatment plant, improvements to the Highland Booster Pump Station and also improvements to the water distribution system in the city.

The expected cost of the improvements will be over $7.5 million dollars including engineering and grant administration services. The projected 2016 construction cost will be $6,069,00, engineering and grant administration services are expected to cost $1,497,000.

The city will pay for the upgrades with a $500,00 grant from the Treasure State Endowment Program and a low interest 4-year loan in the amount of $6,645,000 from Rural Development. The city will kick in $227,000 in its water enterprise fund.

The final design for the project is expected to be completed in December of 2017 with construction to start in May of 2018. Closeout for the project is slated to end in September of 2019.

Tuesday, January 17th 2017
Deficient Roadways Cost Montana Motorists $794 Million Annually
Helena, MT – Roads and bridges that are deteriorated, congested or lack desirable safety features cost Montana motorists a total of $794 million statewide annually – as much as $1,417 per driver in some urban areas - due to higher vehicle operating costs, traffic crashes and congestion-related delays, according to a new report released today by TRIP, a Washington, DC based national nonprofit transportation research organization. These high costs come at a time when the Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) estimates it will face an annual funding shortfall of $874 million through 2021, causing many needed projects to be halted or delayed. Increased investment in transportation improvements at the local, state and federal levels could improve road, bridge and transit conditions, boost safety, relieve traffic congestion and support long-term economic growth in Montana.

The TRIP report, “Montana Transportation by the Numbers: Meeting the State’s Need for Safe, Smooth and Efficient Mobility,” finds that throughout Montana, 34 percent of major urban roads are in poor condition and nearly one-fifth of Montana’s bridges are structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The state’s traffic fatality rate is the third highest in the nation. Montana’s major urban roads are becoming increasingly congested, with drivers wasting significant amounts of time and fuel each year.

The MDT estimates it will face an $874 million average annual shortfall through 2021 in the investment level needed to make further progress in improving road, highway and bridge conditions; improving traffic safety; and, completing needed modernization improvements to enhance economic development opportunities. As a result of a lack of transportation funding, MDT has delayed $144.5 million in road projects that had been scheduled to begin in 2017.

Driving on deficient roads costs Montana drivers $794 million per year in the form of extra vehicle operating costs (VOC) as a result of driving on roads in need of repair, lost time and fuel due to congestion-related delays, and the costs of traffic crashes in which roadway features likely were a contributing factor. The TRIP report calculates the cost to motorists of insufficient roads in the Billings, Great Falls and Missoula urban areas. A breakdown of the costs per motorist in each area along with a statewide total is below.

The TRIP report finds that 34 percent of major urban roads in Montana are in poor condition, while 40 percent are rated in mediocre or fair condition and the remaining 26 percent are in good condition. Driving on deteriorated roads costs Montana drivers an additional $296 million each year in extra vehicle operating costs, including accelerated vehicle depreciation, additional repair costs, and increased fuel consumption and tire wear.

“We’ve been talking about our failing infrastructure and lack of funding for a long time now and have very little to show for all that hand-wringing,” said Darryl James, executive director of the Montana Infrastructure Coalition. “It’s time for a little less talk and a lot more action.”

A total of 18 percent of Montana’s bridges show significant deterioration or do not meet modern design standards. Eight percent of Montana’s bridges are structurally deficient, with significant deterioration to the bridge deck, supports or other major components. An additional ten percent of the state’s bridges are functionally obsolete, which means they no longer meet modern design standards, often because of narrow lanes, inadequate clearances or poor alignment.
“The Montana Infrastructure Coalition is bringing a balanced package of bills supported by a broad spectrum of Montanans,” said Webb Brown, president and CEO of the Montana Chamber of Commerce. “We expect some tough discussions but believe Montana’s lawmakers are ready to step to the plate and work on real solutions to these very real problems. We’re anxious to share our research and data to play a central role in that discussion.”
Traffic crashes in Montana claimed the lives of 1,024 people between 2010 and 2014. Montana’s overall traffic fatality rate of 1.58 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel is significantly higher than the national average of 1.08 and is the third highest in the nation. The fatality rate on Montana’s rural non-Interstate roads was 2.41 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles of travel in 2014, approximately three times higher than the 0.79 fatality rate on all other roads and highways in the state.
“Our transportation system is truly the network that binds our communities together in Montana,” said Steve Arveschoug, executive director of the Big Sky Economic Development Authority. “Our economic security depends on smart investment in infrastructure and it begins with clean water and roads and bridges that are safe and efficient.”
Traffic congestion in Montana is worsening, costing the state’s drivers $170 million annually in lost time and wasted fuel.
The efficiency and condition of Montana’s transportation system, particularly its highways, is critical to the health of the state’s economy. Annually, $101 billion in goods are shipped to and from sites in Montana, mostly by truck. Sixty-seven percent of the goods shipped annually to and from sites in Montana are carried by trucks and another 12 percent are carried by courier services or multiple mode deliveries, which include trucking.
“Conditions will worsen and additional projects will be delayed if greater funding is not made available at the state and local levels,” said Will Wilkins, TRIP’s executive director. “Without adequate investment, Montana’s roads and bridges will become increasingly deteriorated, inefficient and unsafe, hampering economic growth and quality of life.”

Tuesday, January 17th 2017
Hunter/Bowhunter Education Instructor Workshops Held Across Region 6
Pic tagline: “Hunter Ed”- Instructor Scott Thompson teaching students about big game species and antlers

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Hunter and Bowhunter education instructors, and folks interested in becoming instructors, are welcome to attend one of several workshops being held around Region 6 in January and February.

Traditionally, a Region-wide workshop is held every spring. However, this year, FWP is hosting a state-wide workshop in Helena June 23-25. Marc Kloker, the FWP Region 6 Information and Education Program Manager who oversees the hunter and bowhunter education program for the region, decided to host these workshops to be able to reach instructors across the region before classes begin for the year.

“I hope to see all the instructors at the workshops to meet and visit with them, and provide a chance to hand out class materials, visit about changes, and make sure everybody is on board with things in the coming year,” said Kloker. “Also, I felt it was a great opportunity to invite anyone interested in becoming an instructor to see what the program is all about.”

The workshops will be held from 6-8 p.m., and snacks and refreshments will be provided. Instructors and folks interested in becoming instructors are welcome to attend the workshop that best works for them. The workshop locations are as follows:

Havre Tues., Jan. 24, 3rd floor of the hospital, conference room
Poplar Wed., Jan. 25, Fort Peck Community College
Glasgow Tues., Jan. 31, FWP Headquarters, Quonset
Malta Wed., Feb. 1, Malta High School cafeteria
Plentywood Tuesday, Feb. 28, Jubilee Room at the Sheridan Co. Courthouse
Circle (Date and location yet to be determined. Please call for information)

Hunter and Bowhunter education are state-mandated courses, which are taught by dedicated volunteers. The heart of Montana’s Hunter and Bowhunter Education programs is this group of dedicated volunteer instructors. They stand as examples of how each hunter should demonstrate safety, ethics, behavior, and responsibility to not only themselves, but also to landowners, other hunters, and the resource.

Region 6 needs to recruit more of these dedicated men and women to continue to serve the area. Anyone who is at least fourteen-years old is eligible to apply. Volunteer instructors are being sought across the region, which includes the counties of Hill, Blaine, Phillips, Valley, Daniels, McCone, Sheridan, and Roosevelt.

For information on becoming a Hunter or Bowhunter education instructor, visit the FWP web site at fwp.mt.gov/education/hunter/instructors/ to learn more and apply.

For any information or questions on these upcoming workshops, please contact Marc Kloker at 406-228-3704, or email mkloker@mt.gov.

Tuesday, January 17th 2017
Customers Of Montana Dakota Utilities To See Rate Increase This Month
Natural gas and electric customers in eastern Montana who receive service from Montana Dakota Utilities will see rates increase this month to account for increases in the utility’s property taxes.

“It deeply troubles me to see these taxes passed automatically onto rate payers in my district,” said commissioner Tony O’Donnell, R-Billings. “It is highly irregular for a utility to be able to raise rates without the opportunity for the Commission to complete a full review.”

Montana law allows public utilities to pass through a portion of their property taxes onto customers with virtually no input from the PSC. The increases go into effect automatically on Jan. 1, and unless the commission can identify errors in the utilities application within 45 days, the rate increases cannot be reversed.

During the proceeding, the commission lambasted the law and stressed the need for legislative action to fix the problem.

“This proceeding was a model of confusion because of an incredibly short deadline imposed by a law that simply doesn’t work. The legislature should act now to avoid further automatic rate increases for property taxes from being passed onto consumers,” said Travis Kavulla, R., Great Falls, the PSC’s vice chairman.

Though NorthWestern has passed through property tax increases onto consumers using the automatic-increase provision of state law for over a decade, this is the first time that MDU sought similar increases. MDU projects to collect an additional $725,000 and rates will increase by an estimated 2.26 percent and .7 percent for gas and electric services, respectively. Rate increases already went into effect for gas customers, however rates won’t increase for electric customers until May 15 due to a stipulation from the last electric rate case that prevents MDU from raising base rates before April 1 of this year.

The Commission did vote to exclude taxes from assets which the company has yet to prove provide a direct benefit to customers. $144,844 in taxes associated with both environmental upgrades to the Lewis and Clark generation station in Sidney, as well as reciprocating internal combustion engines located on the site, will not be eligible to be passed through to consumers.

Monday, January 16th 2017
JSEC Presents Leadership Seminar On Thursday
JSEC presents Jeff Kaufman – Full Circle Leadership, Thurs. Jan. 19th from 9a.m. – 12noon at the Cottonwood Inn. Lunch will follow the presentation.

Jeff is a Montana native & has focused on several Leadership areas as well as extensive volunteer work. He & his wife co-founded the Full Circle Foundation which offers college scholarships to support the 1st child in a family to attend college, with their focus on small communities.

Jeff will discuss “Do What You Say You Will Do”, “Building Trust with People”, “Leverage Your Fishbowl”.

Cost is $50 per person with lunch included.

Pre-registration is encouraged; call Job Service, 228-9369 or stop by 74 4th Street North.

Monday, January 16th 2017
Winter Grazing Seminar Is Tuesday and Wednesday
Glasgow will play host to the 2017 Winter Grazing Seminar Tues. & Wed. Jan. 17th & 18th.

Participants from around the state will convene at the Cottonwood Inn as speakers discuss a long-run view of the cattle market, being profitable in the beef cattle business, weather, grazing rights, & why grassland birds need ranching.

For more details or to register, contact the Valley County Conservation District at 228-4321.

Monday, January 16th 2017
Elk Management Season to Open in Hunting District 680 and 690
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks has authorized a management season hunt for antlerless elk in portions of Hunting District 680 and 690, starting Saturday, Jan. 14 through Wednesday, Feb. 15.

Hunters signed up for the Hunt Roster in those hunting districts may be selected for this opportunity.

A management season hunt is a proactive measure to prevent or reduce potential damage caused by large concentrations of game animals, resulting from seasonal migrations, extreme weather conditions, restrictive public hunting access on adjacent or nearby properties, or other factors.

“Basically, the main intent of the management season hunt in 680 and 690 is to help bring elk populations in the area closer to population objectives,” said Scott Hemmer, Havre-area biologist.

“Landowners may become eligible for these types of hunts if they allow public hunting during general hunting seasons,” said Hemmer.

Management season hunters are selected from the Hunt Roster, which is traditionally used by FWP regional offices to respond to these hunts with a ready-to-go list. Depending upon their randomized order on the list, hunters registered on the Hunt Roster were contacted by FWP via email or letter.

Hunters need to have signed up to be on the Hunt Roster between June 15 and July 15 of each year.
Those selected hunters may harvest up to two antlerless elk if they possess both an unused general elk license and an unused elk B license. Hunters may purchase a special management hunt B license
at any license provider if they have not previously purchased a general elk license and an antlerless elk B license for the 2016 hunting season.

FWP would like to remind hunters that this is not a “damage hunt,” with elk stacked up in concentrated areas.

“Hunters should prepare to hunt hard for elk, no different than any other hunting season,” said Hemmer. “Expect variable weather conditions to possibly include deep snow and cold.”
Hunters should have means to retrieve elk over potentially long distances. If successful, hunters must report their harvest to Hemmer.

Hunting will be conducted in accordance with the 2016 Montana Elk Hunting Regulations, and will be allowed only during times and in locations as directed by the landowner or FWP staff.

If there are any questions, please contact Hemmer at 406-265-6177, or email shemmer@mt.gov.

Monday, January 16th 2017
Time to Get Your 2017 Bait Fish Seining License
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks would like to remind bait collectors that a 2017 Commercial Bait Fish Seining License is required for persons 15 years of age and older to seine for and transport bait fish for commercial purposes in Montana, or for any person who seines for and has in his/her possession more than 24 dozen nongame bait fish.

The application is available at any FWP office, and an application fee of $10 is required. The application materials also include regulations, the types and sizes of nets/traps that may be used, and also a list of approved seining waters.

Commercial bait collection is not permitted in waters infested with Eurasian watermilfoil. In Region 6 this includes Ft. Peck Reservoir, Ft. Peck Dredge Cuts and the Missouri River from Ft. Peck Dam to the mouth of the Milk River.

Also, with the recent discovery of dreissenid mussels (zebra/quagga mussels) in Tiber Reservoir, seiners are asked to transport their fish away from collection sites in well water. Please do not use site water to transport fish.

Bait seiners need to be aware that only the following 10 fish species can be collected and used as live bait: Flathead Chub, Fathead minnow, Western Silvery Minnow, Plains Minnow, Emerald Shiner, Longnose Dace, Lake Chub, Creek Chub, Longnose and White Sucker.

If there are any questions, please contact your local FWP office.

Friday, January 13th 2017
Montana Department of Transportation Proposes Safety Project for Montana Highway 24
Glasgow - The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) would like to notify the public and seek comments on a proposal to shoulder widen and slope flatten about 1 mile of Montana Highway 24 south of Glasgow in Valley County. The project begins approximately four miles south of Glasgow at reference post 71.5 and extends south for approximately 1 mile, ending at reference post 72.5.

Proposed work includes shoulder widening and slope flattening on the outside of the existing curve. The purpose of the project is to address a crash cluster at this horizontal curve.

Construction is anticipated by 2020 depending on completion of design and availability of funds. New right-of-way and relocation of utilities will likely be required. MDT staff will contact all potentially affected landowners prior to performing survey work on their land. Staff will again contact landowners prior to construction regarding property acquisition and temporary construction permits.

For more information, please contact Glendive District Administrator Shane Mintz at (406) 345-8212 or Project Design Engineer Kevin Gilbert at (406) 4446230. Members of the public may submit written comments to the Montana Department of Transportation Glendive office at P.O. Box 890, Glendive, MT 59330-0890, or online at:

www.mdt.mt.gov/mdt/comment_form.shtml

Thursday, January 12th 2017
Montana Department of Transportation Proposes Seal and Cover Project for Montana Highway 24

Glasgow - The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) would like to notify the public and seek comments on a proposal to seal and cover about 17.2 miles of Montana Highway 24 north of Glasgow in Valley County. The project begins one-half mile north of the Spring Coulee/Cut Across Road intersection at reference post 8.5 and extends north for 17.2 miles, ending about a half mile north of the Dry Fork Creek crossing at reference post 25.7.

Proposed work includes seal and cover and upgraded pavement markings. The purpose of the project is to extend the existing pavement life.

The project is being developed for construction possibly as early as the summer of 2018, depending on completion of all project development activities and availability of funding. No new right-of-way or utility relocations will be needed.

For more information, please contact Glendive District Administrator Shane Mintz at (406) 345-8212 or Project Design Engineer Kevin Gilbert at (406) 4446230. Members of the public may submit written comments to the MDT Glendive office at P.O. Box 890, Glendive, MT 59330-0890, or online at:

www.mdt.mt.gov/mdt/comment_form.shtml

Thursday, January 12th 2017
Valley County Considers Going From 8 Voting Precincts To 3
Currently Valley County has 8 voting precincts but a proposal put forth to the Valley County Commissioners would reduce the number of precincts to just 3.

Currently, there are voting precincts in Lustre, Frazer, Nashua, Fort Peck, Hinsdale and Opheim plus 2 precincts in Glasgow. This proposal would form 3 precincts in Valley County and those precincts would be aligned according to how the Montana House Districts are aligned in Valley County.

The proposal would have all election day voting done in Glasgow at the Glasgow Civic Center. There would be no more election day voting in Lustre, Frazer, Nashua, Fort Peck, Hinsdale and Opheim.

Valley County Election Administrator, Lynne Nyquist, told the Valley County Commissioners that eliminating 5 voting precincts in Valley County could save anywhere from $15,000 to $20,000 per election year. Nyquist said she currently has to pay and train over 30 election judges every election year plus pay for their travel. She also noted it is getting more difficult to find election judges to staff every precinct location.

Nyquist also noted that in the November election, 70% of Valley County residents who voted did so by absentee.

The Valley County Commissioners will look to make a decision on this proposal at a meeting next Wednesday.

Thursday, January 12th 2017
Williston, North Dakota Man Arrested On Drug Charges In Valley County
A 38-year old Williston, North Dakota man was arrested by the Montana Highway Patrol on January 5th and charged with several drug related offenses.

Joseph Bray was arrested on January 5th by the Montana Highway Patrol near Oswego on U.S. Highway #2.

He was charged with 3 misdemeanors including criminal possession of drug paraphernalia, criminal possession of dangerous drugs and driving under the influence of drugs. He was also charged with criminal possession of dangerous drugs-felony.

Bray appeared in Justice Court on January 9th and bond was set at $6855. He posted bond and was released from the Valley County Detention Center.

Wednesday, January 11th 2017
Cold Weather Reports
We took lots of reports of super cold weather early this morning: unofficial resident reports from -19 to -32.

And then there was this picture, from Iva Murch on Brazil Creek Road: -35?

Check our Facebook page for MANY more reports!

Wednesday, January 11th 2017
North Dakota Man Killed In Head-on Crash In Roosevelt County

(Information from: The Billings Gazette, http://www.billingsgazette.com)

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Authorities say a North Dakota man was killed in a head-on crash on U.S. Highway 12 in Roosevelt County.

The Billings Gazette reports the 54-year-old Minot, North Dakota man, whose name has not been released, was in an SUV that crashed into an oncoming pickup near Brockton on Tuesday morning. The driver of the SUV was trying to pass a snow plow at the time of the crash.

The passenger from Minot, who was wearing a seatbelt, died at the scene. No other information was released.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Wednesday, January 11th 2017
Montana Department Of Transportation Proposes Seal And Cover Project For U.S. Highway 2
Wolf Point - The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) would like to notify the public and seek comments on a proposal to seal and cover about 30 miles of U.S. Highway 2 between east of Frazer and west of Poplar in Valley and Roosevelt counties. The project begins just east of the McConnell Road approach at reference post 573.0 and extends east for approximately 30 miles, ending near the Chelsea Creek crossing at reference post 603.0.

Proposed work includes seal and cover, upgraded pavement marking and guardrail, bridge rail revisions, and bridge deck work. The purpose of the project is to extend the existing pavement life and reduce maintenance costs.

The project is being developed for construction as early as the summer of 2018, depending on completion of all project development activities and availability of funding. No new right-of-way or utility relocations will be needed.

For more information, please contact Glendive District Administrator Shane Mintz at (406) 345-8212 or Project Design Engineer Kevin Gilbert at (406) 4446230. Members of the public may submit written comments to the Montana Department of Transportation Glendive office at P.O. Box 890, Glendive, MT 59330-0890, or online at:
www.mdt.mt.gov/mdt/comment_form.shtml

Wednesday, January 11th 2017
Glasgow's Abbi Helland Named To Bullock's Youth Justice Council
Governor Steve Bullock today announced the following appointments.

Board of Physical Therapy Examiners

· Pat Goodover, Great Falls. Qualification: Member of the general public who is not a physician or a physical therapist. Goodover is the Broker-Owner of Professional Brokers of Great Falls, Inc.

Small Business Compliance Assistance Advisory Council

· Michelle Bryan, Missoula. Qualification: Member who is not an owner or representative of an owner of small business stationary sources representing the general public. Bryan is a Professor in the Natural Resources and Environmental Law Program at the Alexander Blewett III School of Law at the University of Montana.

· Diana Vanek, Bozeman. Qualification: Member who is not an owner or representative of an owner of small business stationary sources representing the general public. Vanek is the Coordinator of the Peaks to Prairies Pollution Prevention Information Center at Montana State University Bozeman.

Board of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists

· Lucy Hart Paulson, Missoula. Qualification: Speech-Language Pathologist. Hart Paulson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders at the University of Montana.

· Rachel Stansberry, Lewistown. Qualification: Speech-Language Pathologist. Stansberry is a Speech-Language Pathologist for the Central Montana Learning Resource Center Cooperative.

· Richard Turner, Big Timber. Qualification: Public member who is a consumer of speech-language pathology or audiology services. Turner is a Vocational Consultant for Turner Vocational Resources, LLC.

Youth Justice Council

· Abigail Helland, Bozeman. Qualification: Under the age of 24. Helland is a Psychology student at Montana State University Bozeman.
Tuesday, January 10th 2017
President Obama Honors Federally-Funded Early-Career Scientists Including Glasgow High School Graduate
President Obama on Monday honored a select few scientists and researchers as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards. One of the recipients is Glasgow High School graduate Blake Wiedenheft.

Today, President Obama named 102 scientists and researchers as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers.

“I congratulate these outstanding scientists and engineers on their impactful work,” President Obama said. “These innovators are working to help keep the United States on the cutting edge, showing that Federal investments in science lead to advancements that expand our knowledge of the world around us and contribute to our economy.”

The Presidential Early Career Awards highlight the key role that the Administration places in encouraging and accelerating American innovation to grow our economy and tackle our greatest challenges. This year’s recipients are employed or funded by the following departments and agencies: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Education, Department of Energy, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of the Interior, Department of Veterans Affairs, Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, Smithsonian Institution, and the Intelligence Community. These departments and agencies join together annually to nominate the most meritorious scientists and engineers whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America’s preeminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies' missions.

The awards, established by President Clinton in 1996, are coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President. Awardees are selected for their pursuit of innovative research at the frontiers of science and technology and their commitment to community service as demonstrated through scientific leadership, public education, or community outreach.

The newest recipients are:

Department of Agriculture
Michelle Cilia, USDA Agricultural Research Service
Pankaj Lal, Montclair State University
Michael Ulyshen, USDA Forest Service

Department of Commerce
Nicholas Butch, NIST Center for Neutron Research
Mandy Karnauskas, NOAA Fisheries
Anne Perring, University of Colorado, Boulder
Corey Potvin, University of Oklahoma
John Teufel, NIST Physical Measurement Laboratory
Justin Zook, NIST Material Measurement Laboratory

Department of Defense
Michael Bell, Colorado State University
Nurcin Celik, University of Miami
Kaushik Chowdhury, Northeastern University
Shawn Douglas, University of California, San Francisco
Christopher Dyer, DeepMind and Carnegie Mellon University
Aaron Esser-Kahn, University of California, Irvine
Sinan Keten, Northwestern University
Jonathan Fan, Stanford University
Danna Freedman, Northwestern University
Thomas Harris, Northwestern University
David Hsieh, California Institute of Technology
Osama Nayfeh, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center-Pacific
Olukayode Okusaga, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory
Joseph Parker, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
Adam Pilchak, Air Force Research Laboratory
Harris Wang, Columbia University

Department of Education
Daphna Bassok, University of Virginia
Shayne Piasta, The Ohio State University

Department of Energy
Jonathan Belof, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Carl Dahl, Northwestern University
Eric Duoss, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Anna Grassellino, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
Jacqueline Hakala, National Energy Technology Laboratory
Stephanie Hansen, Sandia National Laboratories
Kory Hedman, Arizona State University
Alan Kruizenga, Sandia National Laboratories
Wei Li, Rice University
Guglielmo Scovazzi, Duke University
Michael Tonks, Penn State University
Jenny Yang, University of California, Irvine
John Yeager, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Department of Health and Human Services
Gregory Alushin, Rockefeller University
Manish Arora, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Dawn Cornelison, University of Missouri
Kashmira Date, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Craig Duvall, Vanderbilt University
Nicholas Gilpin, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center
Anna Greka, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Pamela Guerrerio, National Institutes of Health
Gery Guy, Jr., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Christine Hendon, Columbia University
Catherine Karr, University of Washington
Maria Lehtinen, Boston Children's Hospital
Adriana Lleras-Muney, University of California, Los Angeles
Mary Kay Lobo, University of Maryland School of Medicine
Michael McAlpine, University of Minnesota
Eric Morrow, Brown University
Daniel O'Connor, Johns Hopkins University
Aimee Shen, Tufts University
Cui Tao, University of Texas
Jacquelyn Taylor, Yale School of Nursing
Benjamin Voight, University of Pennsylvania
Matthew Wheeler, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Blake Wiedenheft, Montana State University

Department of Interior
Nathaniel Hitt, U.S. Geological Survey
Sarah Minson, U.S. Geological Survey
Diann Prosser, U.S. Geological Survey

Department of Veterans Affairs
Adam Rose, RAND Corporation and Boston Medical Center
Nasia Safdar, Middleton Memorial Veterans Hospital
Joshua Yarrow, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

Environmental Protection Agency
Havala Pye, Environmental Protection Agency
Sala Senkayi, Environmental Protection Agency

Intelligence Community
Matthew Dicken, U.S. Army
Josiah Dykstra, National Security Agency
James Kang, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency
Jason Matheny, Office of the Director of National Intelligence
David Moehring, IonQ, Inc.
R. Jacob Vogelstein, Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity

National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Jeremy Bassis, University of Michigan
Othmane Benafan, NASA Glenn Research Center
Dalia Kirschbaum, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Marco Pavone, Stanford University
Miguel Roman, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

National Science Foundation
Alicia Alonzo, Michigan State University
Randy Ewoldt, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Emily Fox, University of Washington
Jacob Fox, Stanford University
Eric Hudson, University of California, Los Angeles
Shawn Jordan, Arizona State University
Ahmad Khalil, Boston University
Oleg Komogortsev, Texas State University, San Marcos
John Kovac, Harvard University
Bérénice Mettler, University of Minnesota and icuemotion, LLC
Jelani Nelson, Harvard University
Elizabeth Nolan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Michael Rotkowitz, University of Maryland, College Park
Andrea Sweigart, University of Georgia
Chuanbing Tang, University of South Carolina
Aradhna Tripati, University of California, Los Angeles
Franck Vernerey, University of Colorado, Boulder
Juan Pablo Vielma Centeno, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Makeba Wilbourn, Duke University

Smithsonian Institution
Nicholas Pyenson, Smithsonian Institution

Monday, January 9th 2017
Hi-Line Sportsmen’s First Conservation Fundraising Banquet Is Feb. 18 In Glasgow
Plan to attend the first annual Hi-Line Sportsmen’s fundraising banquet on Saturday, Feb. 18 for a chance to win guns, buy sporting goods and home décor, tuck into a choice prime-rib dinner, and help fund local conservation efforts.

The banquet will be held at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church’s parish hall in Glasgow. Doors open at 4:30 p.m., dinner will be served at 6 p.m., and a rousing live auction will follow.

Single tickets cost $30, couples tickets run $50, and sponsor couples tickets cost $200. Or you can gather eight of your friends and buy a regular table for $700 or a sponsor table for $800. Sponsors get a Hi-Line Sportsmen pullover and a chance at a gun. Each buyer of a sponsor table will also have a Ruger 10/22 rifle to distribute to tablemates.

Purchase your tickets before Feb. 6 to ensure your seat and for a chance to win two tickets to the Joe Diffie concert at the Northeast Montana Fair. Early-bird buyers also get a discount on raffle tickets. You can buy tickets from any Hi-Line Sportsmen committee member (see the roster below) or call Jenn Jackson at 263-7339.

While this is the first banquet put on by the Hi-Line Sportsmen, it’s hardly the first time St. Raphael’s will play host to conservation funding. The new group rose from the Hi-Line Gobblers chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation, and you’ll recognize many of the same people and games at the Hi-Line Sportsmen event. And be treated to the same prime-rib dinner prepared by members of the American Legion and Auxiliary. But the new group is committed to keeping conservation local, and reinvesting proceeds from fundraisers into local projects.

Highlights of the Feb. 18 banquet will include the presentation of the annual Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship to college-bound Valley County high-schoolers, the auctioning of the next Barb Marsh Memorial rifle, and the distribution of more than 20 guns through various raffles, games, and auctions.

Guns include a Browning X-Bolt chambered in 6.5 Creedmoor, Stevens 555 over/under shotgun, Remington 700 Long-Range in choice of caliber, T/C Venture predator package, and a certificate for a semi-custom rifle from Montana Rifle Company.

Visit the Hi-Line Sportsmen’s Facebook page for periodic updates. Call Jenn Jackson at 263-7339 or email Jackson at jenn.stein@nemont.net for information about both the scholarship and the banquet, which raises funds for local wildlife conservation, outdoor recreation, youth events, and our hunting heritage. Other committee members include: Jace and Lisa Ball, Scott Billingsley, Ed Sugg, Levi Sugg, Arron Fjeld, Bill Fransen, Andrew McKean, Tyrel Brandt, Storm Jackson, Mike Chappell, Steve Wellendorf, Mike Lackner, Jack Medicott, Brandon Brunelle, Bryan Krumwiede, Tara and Luke Strommen, Drew Henry, Ryan and Cara Budde, Jory Casterline, Marc Kloker, Justin Schaaf, and Juice Fischer.

Monday, January 9th 2017
New Trends In Agriculture Seminar Is Wednesday
“New Trends in Agriculture,” a day-long seminar put on by the Glasgow Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture, will be held Wed. Jan. 11th at the Cottonwood Inn.

Registration begins at 8a.m.

Speakers will cover making the best of a challenge in agriculture, cover crops, an outlook for commodities, grants, & remote weather stations.

For more details, contact the Chamber at 228-2222.

Monday, January 9th 2017
Public Comment Meeting On The “Quiet Waters” Initiative Is Tonight
FWP will have a Public Comment meeting on the “Quiet Waters” Initiative Mon. Jan. 9th at 6p.m. at the Glasgow FWP Region 6 office.

Concerned persons may submit their data, views, or arguments either orally or in writing at the hearing.

Written data, views, or arguments may also be submitted to: Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks, Attn: Quiet Waters Petition, P.O. Box 200701, Helena, Montana, 59620-0701; or e-mail QuietWaters@mt.gov, no later than Jan. 13th.

Friday, January 6th 2017
Trial Date Set For Wolf Point Man Charged With Kidnapping 4-Year Old Girl
GREAT FALLS — A federal judge has scheduled a Feb. 6 trial for a man charged with kidnapping a 4-year-old girl from a park in Wolf Point and sexually assaulting her.

U.S. District Judge Brian Morris held a brief competency hearing for John William Lieba II on Thursday, during which Lieba said he was fit to stand trial.

Morris had previously ordered a mental health exam for Lieba after his attorney said Lieba had stopped taking his anti-psychotic medication and did not remember the events described in the indictment charging him with kidnapping, aggravated sexual abuse and assault resulting in serious bodily injury.

The girl was abducted on Feb. 26, 2016. Lieba was arrested before the girl was located on Feb. 28.

Friday, January 6th 2017
Glasgow Couple Encourage Change In Montana Law Regarding Sexual Intercourse Without Consent
Story From Great Falls Tribune

HELENA – A state panel on Thursday reviewed two bills that would change the ways that young people convicted of sexual intercourse without consent are handled in the state.

The Senate Judiciary Committee heard testimony on proposed Senate bills 26 and 17 as the state legislative session began Monday.

SB 26 would give judges some discretion when it comes to charges of sexual relations between teenagers. It allows an 18-year-old convicted of sexual intercourse without consent with a victim who is 14 or older to be incarcerated, but the person does not have to register as a sex offender as long as no force was used.

SB 17 allows for juvenile offenders with no history of sexual offenses to not have to register as sex offenders as long as registration is not necessary to protect the public.

The board took no action Thursday.

Among those testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee were a husband and wife from Glasgow who are seeking clemency from the state after he was prosecuted for sexual intercourse without consent in their relationship that started when he was 19 and she was 15.

Russell Delano Foster, now 41, and wife, Amber, have been married for 21 years and have four children.

In July, the Montana Board of Pardons and Parole voted unanimously to grant executive clemency to Russell Foster. That request is still with Gov. Steve Bullock.

“I know my case is unique,” he told the panel Thursday, “but I know others are out there.”

Both bills received support from the Montana County Attorneys Association, the Montana Sex Offender Treatment Association and the ACLU of Montana.

Brenda Erdelyi of the Montana Sex Offender Treatment Association said the brain is developing until people are in their mid-20s and young people make a “lot of bad choices.”

Some testifying asked the panel to consider increasing the age to 19, while others said it should go as high as 21 and the victim’s age should be lowered to 13.

She said offenders on the list often have trouble finding jobs.

“Their futures are in jeopardy,” Malek said.

Mark Murphy, representing the Montana County Attorneys Association, said SB 26 would more accurately allow prosecutors to take appropriate action with sex crimes.

He expected about six crimes statewide would be impact annually.

Amber Foster said she lives with guilt in that she never wanted her husband to be charged.

She said her husband’s offense has kept them from living in certain apartment complexes and hampered employment.

“You cannot go and do any job,” she said, “you just get what you can take.”

SK Rossi, director of Advocacy and Public Policy for the ACLU, said her group was not a fan of Montanans being on a list.

She said the bill did not go far enough, “but it is a good step.”

Erdelyi said less than 3 percent of adolescents convicted commit a new offense when released.

She and others said that forcing them to be put on a registry does not fulfill the intended purpose, which is to keep people safe.

Friday, January 6th 2017
Community Cash Program A Huge Success
The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture had a very successful holiday season with its Annual Community Cash program.

The Community Cash Script was available starting on October 14, 2016 at First Community Bank in Glasgow/Hinsdale, Valley Bank and Independence Bank. The purpose of the Community Cash program is to encourage people in our area to “Shop Locally”. The Glasgow merchants offer a variety of quality products along with outstanding customer service.

In 2016, 67 Chamber business members participated in the program with 76 loans totaling $71,800 from Valley Bank, 37 loans totaling $33,200 from FCB, and 19 loans totaling $16,850 from Independence Bank for a total of $121,850 dollars Spent Locally! The Chamber Big Bucks program was also very successful. From October 14th thru December 31st, 2016 alone over $37,836 of Chamber Big Bucks was purchased from the Chamber office.

With both programs $159,686 was spent LOCALLY during the 2016 Holiday season in Glasgow. This is up $10,000 from last year. The Chamber thanks everybody for participating in these programs and supporting our local merchants! “BUY LOCALLY AND THE BUCK STAYS HERE”

Thursday, January 5th 2017
Additional Criminal Charges Expected Within Next Week For Jay Witkowski
The Valley County Sheriff's Office along with the Glasgow Police Department, Montana Highway Patrol and Federal Bureau of Investigation are continuing their investigation into an incident that occurred New Years Eve east of Glasgow.

According to Valley County Sheriff Vernon Buerkle, a Glasgow woman, Evelynn Garcia, was stabbed and either thrown out of or run over by a vehicle on highway #24 near the Northern Border Pipeline office, east of Glasgow.

The woman was found at approximately 7pm on Saturday evening in the middle of the highway suffering from stab wounds and injuries from either being thrown out of a vehicle or run over by a vehicle.

Sheriff Buerkle told Kltz/Mix-93 that Evelynn Garcia passed away on Tuesday afternoon due to injuries suffered in the incident.

Sheriff Buerkle said that Jay Witkowski from Shepherd, Montana has been arrested and is currently incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center. Witkowski is 28 years old and was charged with assault with a weapon, aggravated assault and criminal endangerment.

All 3 charges are felonies and bond has been set at $500,000. With the death of the victim, Sheriff Buerkle told Kltz/Mix-93 News that additional charges are expected to be filed within the next week.

Sheriff Buerkle said that an intensive investigation is continuing into this case and as soon as more information is obtained additional charges will be filed against Witkowski.

Witkowski has a prior criminal record including a conviction on a drug offense out of Richland County.

Thursday, January 5th 2017
Glasgow High School Graduation Rate At 95.8%
After increasing each year since 2011, Montana high school graduation rates dipped last year, according to figures from the Montana Office of Public Instruction.

The 85.6 percent rate is still the second highest since the OPI began measuring the statistic in 2000, down from 86.04 percent last year.

Locally, the graduation rate at Glasgow High School for the 2015-2016 school year was 95.8% which is the highest rate in the past five years.

For the 2014-2015 school year the graduation rate was 92%. The lowest rate in the past five years was 86% for the 2012-2013 school year.

Other area schools and their graduation rate for the 2015-2016 school year:

Nashua- 100%
Opheim- 100%
Hinsdale- 100%
Frazer- 75%
Saco- 100%
Malta- 89%
Wolf Point- 69%
Poplar- 38%


Wednesday, January 4th 2017
Information Sought for Bull Elk Poached in Northeast Chouteau County
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks game wardens are seeking information from the public about the poaching of a bull elk on the Warrick Road in the Bears Paw Mountains.

Warden Andy Matakis said the bull elk was found on private land approximately 5.5 miles west of Warrick. The elk was likely shot on Dec. 29 or 30. Nothing was taken from the elk and the entire carcass was left to waste in the field.

“The season for hunting bull elk in hunting district 690 ended five weeks ago,” Matakis said. “This is a popular area where it is difficult to draw a permit. We have had three bull elk killed and wasted this fall in the Bears Paws, which takes away hunting opportunities for someone in the future.”

Anyone with information about the crime is encouraged to call Matakis directly at 406-262-2407, or FWP’s 24-hour wildlife tip line at 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668).

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

Wednesday, January 4th 2017
Ice Fishing Derby Set For February 11
The “Cabin Fever-Let’s Go Fishing”
The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture will hold the 19th Annual Ice Fishing Derby February 11, 2017. The Derby will be held at the Fishing Access Site-The Dredge Cuts Trout Pond located on Highway 117. Registration is from 10AM-1P. Fishing is from 12-3PM, the ENTRY FEE is $50 per Hole or 3 Holes for $100. Cash and prizes will be awarded at 3:30pm at the Gateway. There are over 200 holes pre-drilled for the anglers.

First place is GUARANTEED for $2,000. The first and largest fish of walleye, northern pike, yellow perch, carp, sucker, burbot, lake trout or bass weighing in wins. You must have a current MT fishing license to participate. Due to poor ice conditions, no tournament was held in 2016. In 2015, over $5,000 in cash and prizes was awarded. A Yeti cooler is being raffled off and will be drawn for at 4PM at the Gateway Bar. Hot cocoa, coffee, hot dogs and bratwursts, onions & kraut will be for sale during the Derby. The ladies will also be holding the 50/50 drawing.

The tournament is sponsored by Nemont Beverage, Glasgow Distributors, Nemont, Coca Cola, Hi-Line Ford, D&G Sports & Western, Cotttonwood Inn, KLTZ/KLAN, First Community Bank, Ezzie’s Wholesale, Reynolds Market, Valley Bank, JR’s Party Store #24, , The Gateway Club, Newton Motors, Thompson & Sons, NorthWestern Energy, Edward Jones, , and Northern Prarie Auto.

Entry forms are available at the Glasgow Chamber office, 406-228-2222, The Fort Peck Marina, or online. Bring the kids, sleds, skates and bait for a fun Ice Day at Fort Peck Lake MT. Join us for an afternoon of fishing and fun.

Wednesday, January 4th 2017
Valley County Man Faces Felony Charges As Result Of Incident In City Of Glasgow**Updated**
39-year old Larry Gilbert is being held in the Valley County Detention Center after an incident that occurred on the south side of Glasgow.

The incident occurred at a residence on 6th Avenue South in Glasgow on December 27th at 1am. According to Glasgow Police Chief Bruce Barstad, Larry Gilbert threatened a young adult male with an assault rifle by pointing it directly at him. An adult female who was at the residence was also threatened and physically assaulted by the assault rifle that Gilbert was holding.

Gilbert then allegedly dragged the woman by the hair while driving his vehicle, at which time the young adult male fired shots at the vehicle. At this time, Gilbert released the woman and drove down the street.

He was then apprehended by authorities and law enforcement discovered that Gilbert was carrying a concealed weapon.

Gilbert is charged with 2 counts of felony intimidation, 2 counts of assault with a weapon and 1 count of criminal endangerment. He is also charged with misdemeanor partner family member assault.

Additional criminal charges have been filed against Larry Gilbert by the VCSO. He has been charged with felony criminal mischief and misdemeanor carrying a concealed weapon. VCS Vern Buerkle told Kltz/Mix-93 News that Gilbert allegedly damaged equipment in the Valley County Detention Center and the result is the felonly criminal mischief charge.

He is currently incarcerated at the Valley County Detention Center with bond set at $250,000.

The Glasgow Police Department and the Valley County Sheriff's Office continue this investigation.

Tuesday, January 3rd 2017
Victim Valley County Stabbing Passes Away
The Valley County Sheriff's Office along with the Glasgow Police Department, Montana Highway Patrol and Federal Bureau of Investigation are currently investigating an incident that occurred near Glasgow on New Years Eve.

According to Valley County Sheriff Vernon Buerkle, a Glasgow woman, Evelynn Garcia, was stabbed and run over by a vehicle on highway #42 near the Northern Border Pipeline office, east of Glasgow.

The woman was found at approximately 7pm on Saturday evening in the middle of the highway suffering from stab wounds and injuries from being run over by a vehicle.

Sheriff Buerkle told Kltz/Mix-93 that Evelynn Garcia passed away on Tuesday afternoon due to injuries suffered in the incident.

Sheriff Buerkle said that Jay Witkowski from Shepherd, Montana has been arrested and is currently incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center. Witkowski is 28 years old and was charged with assault with a weapon, aggravated assault and criminal endangerment.

All 3 charges are felonies and bond has been set at $500,000. With the passing of Garcia it is expected that Witkowski will be charged with murder. He appeared in Justice Court Tuesday morning but another appearance in court is expected soon.

This is a developing story and as soon as additional information is available we will post it.

Tuesday, January 3rd 2017
245 Rides Given For New Year's Eve
Valley County Search and Rescue along with local wreckers services game 245 rides on New Year's Eve compared to the 160 rides given last year.

Also, 4 cars were driven to their homes by volunteers.

This is an annual service provided by Valley County Search and Rescue and local wrecker services.

Tuesday, January 3rd 2017
21 Canada Geese Left To Waste Near Glasgow: Wardens Seeking Information
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks game wardens are seeking information on 21 wasted Canada geese, likely shot in mid to late December, that were found on the banks of Brazil Creek just west of Paulo Reservoir, about 10 miles from Glasgow.

Twenty-two geese were found, including one that was completely processed. The other 21 had only the breasts removed. Under Montana regulations, all waterfowl larger than a teal duck need to have at least the breasts and thighs removed.

Warden Chase Sanderson, who discovered the geese, said “They must have cleaned one completely, then determined it was too much work and just breasted out the rest. Even that was done poorly.”

Anyone with information about the crime is encouraged to call FWP’s 24-hour wildlife tip line at 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668), or call Warden Sanderson directly at 406-263-0068.

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

Tuesday, January 3rd 2017
Valley County High School Seniors Encouraged To Apply For Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship
All Valley County high school seniors are eligible to apply for a substantial college scholarship that will be awarded in February by the Hi-Line Sportsmen.

Scholarship winners will be announced at the conservation group’s first-annual fundraising banquet, scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017 at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church’s parish hall in Glasgow. This is the third year the Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship will be presented to qualifying high school seniors. But it’s the first year that the scholarship is administered by the Hi-Line Sportsmen; previously the scholarship was administered by the local chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation.

Scholarship applicants must possess a valid Montana hunting license. Other considerations are community service and participation in hunting and conservation-oriented activities. Application deadline for the scholarship is Jan. 20, 2017.

The scholarship is presented in memory of Barb Marsh, a longtime supporter of wildlife conservation and local youth, who died unexpectedly in January 2014. Each year since her death, Barb’s partner, Joe Younkin, has sponsored a special rifle that is auctioned at the conservation banquet. Proceeds from the previous year’s auction are distributed to eligible high school students the following year. The amount of the scholarship varies from year to year since it is dependent on funds raised by the auction, but in previous years, multiple $1,000 scholarships were awarded to college-bound Valley County high schoolers.

Younkin has donated another firearm to the Hi-Line Sportsmen’s 2017 banquet that will fund 2018 scholarships. Plan to attend the Feb. 18 banquet to bid on the special scholarship gun—a Henry Golden Boy lever-action .22 rifle—as well as other firearms, sporting goods, and home décor, and to recognize the winner or winners of the 2016 Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship.

For details about eligibility and other information about the scholarship, students are encouraged to visit with career counselors at high schools in Glasgow, Nashua, Frazer, Hinsdale, Opheim, and Lustre.

Call Jenn Jackson at 263-7339 or email Jackson at jenn.stein@nemont.net for information about both the scholarship and the banquet, which raises funds for local wildlife conservation, outdoor recreation, youth events, and our hunting heritage.

Monday, January 2nd 2017
VCSO Investigating New Years Eve Stabbing
The Valley County Sheriff's Office along with the Montana Highway Patrol and Federal Bureau of Investigation are currently investigating an incident that occurred near Glasgow on New Years Eve.

According to Valley County Sheriff Vernon Buerkle, a Glasgow woman was stabbed and run over by a vehicle on highway #42 near the Northern Border Pipeline office, east of Glasgow. The woman was found at approximately 7pm on Saturday evening in the middle of the highway suffering from stab wounds and injuries from being run over by a vehicle.

Sheriff Buerkle told Kltz/Mix-93 News that a male from Shepherd, Montana has been arrested and is currently incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center. Sheriff Buerkle did not release the name of the suspect. The suspect is set to appear in Justice Court on Tuesday on several criminal charges related to the New Years Eve incident.

The victim was transported by ambulance to the Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital and was then flown by air ambulance for further medical treatment in Billings, Montana.

Sheriff Buerkle told Kltz/Mix News that more information will be released on the incident after the suspect appears in court.

Friday, December 30th 2016
New Year's Eve Rides Available
Valley County Search & Rescue along with the local wrecker services, Thompson & Sons, Glenn's Automotive, Hi-Line Collision, will be giving rides again this New Year's Eve.

DUI Taskforce will be donating to SAR for each ride given, up to $500.

Names & Numbers of those donating their services are:
Tom Pewitt, Hi-Line Collision, 263-2154
Tom & Dawn Thompson, Thompson & Sons, 263-7265
Doug Cook, Glenn's Automotive, 263-1249 (Park Grove & Fort Peck Area)
Randy Isakson, SAR, 263-2193
Kenny Bryan, SAR, 263-5116
Jeron Wesen, SAR, 263-0265
Whisky Isakson, SAR, 263-2505
Stone Tihista, SAR, 263-8383 (Nashua Area).

Friday, December 30th 2016
Community Cash
The Glasgow Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture reminds consumers that the last day to use the Community Cash program is December 31st.

With the program, you may borrow up to $1,000 from these financial institutions:
First Community Bank in Glasgow and Hinsdale
Valley Bank in Glasgow
Independence Bank in Glasgow
(Equal Opportunity Lenders, members FDIC)

How it works:
1. Fill out a loan application at one of the 4 participating financial institutions
2. The loan is payable in 10 monthly installments; you pay no interest, only a $10 fee to cover a portion of the paperwork.
3. The script can be used until December 31, 2016. Thereafter, you have until January 8, 2017 to turn in your unused script to the bank for full credit.
4. When your loan is approved, you will receive special Community Cash script which you can spend in any of the participating Community Cash businesses.
5. The last day to apply for Community Cash is December 30, 2016.
6. Wells Fargo will accept Community Cash deposits from the MEMBER merchants.
7. Merchant MUST be a Chamber member to accept Community Cash script.

Friday, December 30th 2016
BLM Releases Draft EIS on Proposed Withdrawal in Crucial Sage-Grouse Habitat
WASHINGTON, DC – As part of its continuing efforts to conserve habitat vital to healthy populations of the Greater Sage-Grouse in the West, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced the draft proposal to withdraw a subset of lands that are sage-grouse strongholds from future mining claims.

Based on public comments received during the scoping period over the last year, the draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) analyzes five alternatives, ranging from no action to the withdrawal of approximately 10 million acres of federal locatable minerals in certain areas that are particularly crucial to the Greater Sage-Grouse in six states: Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming.

The announcement, which will be published in the Federal Register tomorrow, opens a 90-day public comment period that will end March 30, 2017. The BLM will also host eight public meetings throughout the West in February to gather input on the proposal and alternatives to the proposal.

“We appreciate the input we’ve received from states, tribes, and other important stakeholders to help develop this draft analysis of the proposed mineral withdrawal,” said Kristin Bail, BLM assistant director for resources and planning. “We look forward to working closely with the public in the coming months as we finalize a proposal to protect important Greater Sage-Grouse habitat from potential future disturbance resulting from mining claims.”

Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell first announced the proposed withdrawal in September, 2015, as part of the unprecedented, landscape-scale effort that began with BLM’s and its state and federal partners’ successful efforts to prevent the Greater Sage-Grouse from being listed under the Endangered Species Act.

To develop the proposal and its alternatives, the BLM held public meetings in November 2015 in the six states to gather information and comments about whether to withdraw these areas from the location of new mining claims for up to 20 years. The BLM also incorporated a mineral resource assessment prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey to help develop a reasonably foreseeable development scenario for the draft EIS.

In addition to releasing the draft EIS today, the agency published a Notice of Amended Proposed Withdrawal that would add about 388,000 acres to the approximately 10 million acres that are already temporarily segregated under the mining laws until Sept. 24, 2017. These lands represent a proposal by the State of Nevada that areas adjacent to SFAs that contain high value habitat and identified Greater Sage-Grouse populations should be withdrawn, instead of high mineral development potential areas in the SFAs. The draft EIS includes an alternative that evaluates the environmental consequences of this substitution.

Neither the segregation, nor any subsequent withdrawal, would prohibit ongoing or future mining exploration or extraction operations on valid pre-existing claims.

At one time, the Greater Sage-Grouse population likely numbered in the millions, but is estimated to have dwindled to 200,000 to 500,000 individuals range-wide. Sagebrush, the Greater Sage-Grouse’s primary habitat, also supports more than 350 other animal and plant species in the Western United States.

A fact sheet, draft EIS and Notice of Amended Proposed Withdrawal, dates and times for public meetings and a map of the proposed withdrawals are available here. You can comment by mailing written comments to Mark Mackiewicz, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) WO, C/O Price Field Office, 125 South 600 West, Price, Utah 84501 or by submitting electronically to sagebrush_withdrawals@blm.gov.

Friday, December 23rd 2016
Juvenile Pleads Guilty To Vandalism At Valley Event Center
The Valley County Sheriff's Office has told Kltz/Mix-93 that a 16-year old juvenile has pleaded guilty to a charge related to vandalism at the Valley Event Center.

On December 5th a report of vandalism at the Valley Event Center was reported. A vehicle had rammed into the fire escape located on the north side of the building completely tearing the fire escape away from the building. Total damage to the building was $450.

On Wednesday, December 21st, the VCSO reported that a 16 year old juvenile was issued a citation for Reckless Driving.

The juvenile made an appearance in Valley County Justice Court on December 22nd and pleaded guilty to the charge. The juvenile was fined $185 and ordered to serve 60 hours of community service.

Also, the Valley Event Center is closing their parking lot due to several acts of vandalism, littering & property damage. The parking lot area is closed to the public with the exception of approved activities.

Trespassers will be prosecuted & the Valley County Sheriff’s Department will be enforcing this policy.

Friday, December 23rd 2016
Updated Christmas Storm Information (4 p.m. Friday)
From the National Weather Service:

With the forecast issued this afternoon, we have upgraded the Winter Storm Watch:

Winter Storm Warning: Sheridan, E. Roosevelt, Richland, Dawson, Prairie, and Wibaux Counties, for 6 to 9 inches of snow and blowing snow.

Winter Weather Advisory: Daniels, W. Roosevelt, McCone, Valley, Garfield, Phillips and Petroleum Counties for 4 to 6 inches of snow and blowing snow.

The main snow event will begin later on Christmas Eve in the west then expand eastward toward the border with North Dakota on Christmas Day.

Winds will be from the east overnight tonight at 15 to 20 mph, then increase on Saturday to 20 to 25 mph, turn more from the north by Sunday and increase to 25 to 30 mph. Expect occasional gusts up to 35 mph.

Travel will become hazardous with snow covered roads and blowing snow reducing visibility at times. Worse conditions (possible Blizzard) will prevail further east into North Dakota through the later part of the weekend and into Monday.

Don't forget to stay tuned to the latest forecast and warning information.

Friday, December 23rd 2016
Canadian Prime Minister States That Trump Is Supportive Of Keystone
CALGARY, Alberta—Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Wednesday, Dec. 21, that U.S. President-elect Donald Trump was "very supportive" of TransCanada Corp's proposed Keystone XL crude oil pipeline in their first conversation after the U.S. election.

The 830,000-barrel-per-day Keystone XL pipeline would carry oil sands crude from Alberta to the U.S. Midwest, but the Obama administration rejected it last year.

"He actually brought up Keystone XL and indicated that he was very supportive of it," Trudeau told the audience at an event in Calgary, Canada's oil capital. "I will work with the new administration when it gets sworn in ... I'm confident that the right decisions will be taken."

Trump has previously said he would approve the pipeline but wanted a "better deal" for the United States. His election heartened investors in Canada's battered energy industry, which has struggled with two years of low prices and long-running concerns about market access.

Trudeau, who also supports Keystone XL, said he also saw "extraordinary opportunities" for Canada if the United States takes a step back from tackling climate change, given the business opportunities that will probably arise from new global environmental policies.

Canada's Parliament in October ratified the Paris agreement to curb climate-warming emissions, bolstering Trudeau's effort to tackle them after a decade of inaction by the previous government. This month the Liberal government introduced a landmark national carbon price.

Critics say those policies will make the country less attractive to investment, especially with climate change skeptic Trump leading the United States. Trudeau's government says those measures will make Canada more attractive to green technology development and research.

Wednesday, December 21st 2016
Valley County Conservation District And NRCS Looking To Build Exhibits At Children's Museum
Press Release -
The Valley County Conservation District and NRCS are raising money to build exhibits and games for children to explore and learn about science and Valley County agriculture at the Children’s Museum of NE Montana.

They are collecting new items (no clothing please but money donations are welcome) at the USDA Service Center to be sold through a silent auction at the Winter Grazing Seminar, Tuesday January 17th and Wednesday January 18th at the Cottonwood Inn and Suites in Glasgow.

Please help us make sure all our young people stay connected to our agricultural roots.

Thank you for your support.

Wednesday, December 21st 2016
Another Storm System Could Move Through This Weekend
The National Weather Service is keeping its eye on a winter storm that will likely impact holiday travel.

The system looks like it will affect our region Friday night through the Christmas weekend.

Details:
Another large low pressure system will swing in from the west. More recent forecast shows that snow will likely occur across most of Montana along with nearby states and Southern Canadian Prairies. At this point it is looking like a widespread winter storm.

For eastern Montana, for Friday Night and Saturday, the best chance for accumulating snow will be along and north of the Missouri River.

Saturday Night, the snow will spread into all of Eastern Montana and continue through all day Christmas Day and possibly Sunday Night. Current forecast estimates are for 5 to 10 inches of snow for northeast Montana.

Snow amount forecasts are likely to change. Chances are good that there will be some blowing and drifting snow but there is high uncertainty with the wind forecast at this point.

Confidence: Confidence is high that there will be snow. Uncertainty remains on snow amounts and wind which could vary depending on the track. High impacts to holiday travel is likely.

Please continue to closely monitor the situation as the weekend approaches.

Wednesday, December 21st 2016
Experts: Demand For Oil Workers To Intensify In 2017
WILLISTON, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota employment experts predict demands for oil field workers will only become more intense in 2017.

Cindy Sanford at the Job Service North Dakota office in Williston says the largest uptick is for hydraulic fracturing crews, which average between 45 and 65 people per crew.

Sanford says recruiters from two large oil field services companies, Schlumberger and Oil States, stopped by the Job Service office this week.

The Williston Herald (http://bit.ly/2i0AuJ2 ) says the state's core oil-producing counties, including Williams, McKenzie, Divide and Mountrail, have about 1,300 job openings across all sectors.
Information from: Williston Herald, http://www.willistonherald.com

(Copyright 2016 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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