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Latest Local News
Friday, February 16th 2018
Winter Access To Fort Peck Lake
Recreationists accessing Fort Peck Lake and the Dredge Cuts this winter are reminded that motorized vehicle use is only permitted on public roads, numbered roads, boat ramps, or designated ice access routes within U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Recreation Areas. Properly licensed or registered motorized vehicles, including snowmobiles and ATVs, are limited to operation on these identified roads and trails. All other off-road vehicle operations are prohibited on USACE lands. This prohibition includes driving along the shoreline of Fort Peck Lake or the Dredge Cuts between the frozen lake and the high water mark except for the purpose of navigating around an ice pressure ridge or open water by the shortest route, not to exceed 1/8 mile.

Once on the ice, recreationists may travel safely at their discretion; however, the US Army Corps of Engineers does not encourage or recommend driving on the ice at any time. Thin ice or open water may exist near springs and pressure ridges and conditions change throughout the winter.

In addition to recreation area boat ramps, the following designated routes for ice access are available on Fort Peck Project: the road behind the Shaft Buildings; First Dredge Cuts access road south west of the Park Grove Bridge; Second Dredge north parking lot immediately south of the vault toilet; and Pines Recreation Area road #1301 to the shoreline.

For more information, call the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Peck Project Natural Resources staff at (406) 526-3411.

Friday, February 16th 2018
First Hunter Education Classes Offered Across Region 6 for Youth and Adults

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Hunter Education course dates have been set for many areas across Region 6. All hunter education classes are free of charge. In the next month, classroom courses (for youth) are being held in:
Havre: starting Feb. 15
Malta: starting Feb. 26
Bainville: starting March 3 (currently full)
Glasgow: starting March 8
Saco: starting March 12
Scobey: starting March 12

All students must register online at the FWP website: fwp.mt.gov; click on the education tab, then click “hunter education programs”. Next, “Find a class or field course” and search for the available class in your area. Detailed instructions on dates, times, and other information will be found at each class’ registration page.

For youth to be eligible to hunt and be fully certified during the 2018 season, hunters must be 12-years old by January 16, 2019. Students aged 10 and 11 can take a course and hunt as an apprentice, but will not be fully certified until the year they turn 12. Preference will be given to 11 and 12-year olds (or older) if the class becomes full. All registrants for these events must be 10 years old by the first day of class, but

Adult online field course will be held in the next month as well:
Great falls: March 3
Glasgow: March 11

For the adult online field course, adults must pass the online hunter education course and receive a Field Day Qualifier Certificate. Adults looking to complete the online course can find instructions here. The Field Day Qualifier Certificate and a picture ID are necessary to obtain entrance into the field course.

If there are any questions, please call the Glasgow FWP office at 228-3700.

Thursday, February 15th 2018
Gilbert Mogan files for Valley County Commissioner
Valley County Election Administrator Lynne Nyquist has told Kltz/Mix-93 that Gilbert Mogan has become the 6th candidate to file for Valley County Commissioner.

He joins the other candidates who have already filed: Michael Carney, Arlie Gordon, Jim Uphaus, Todd Young and Rene Clampitt.

There will be both a primary and general election for the position.

Here are the other filings for elected positions in Valley County:

Treasurer: Brenda Anderson

Valley County Attorney: Dylan Jensen

Valley County Sheriff/Coroner: Lucas Strommen

Valley County Clerk and Recorder: Taryn Stebleton and Ruth Dowell

Valley County Justice of the Peace: Christina Hillman

Monday, February 12th 2018
Local Communities Receive Grant Funding From State of Montana

HELENA, Mont. – Sixty-three Montana communities will share $900,000 in infrastructure planning grants through the Montana Department of Commerce’s Treasure State Endowment Program (TSEP) to assist with the financing of public facilities projects.
“These planning grants support the growth and development of Montana’s vibrant and charming towns,” Commerce Director Pam Haxby-Cote said. “Every community needs clean drinking water and safe bridges, which is what these TSEP grants support.”
The following communities have received TSEP Infrastructure Planning grants:
• Beaverhead County: $15,000 complete a Capital Improvements Plan and Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Bigfork County Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Big Horn County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Black Eagle Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Blaine County: $9,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Carbon County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Cascade County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Chouteau County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Boulder: $13,000 to complete a Capital Improvements Plan.
• City of Cut Bank: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Deer Lodge: $15,000 to complete a Water Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of East Helena: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Fort Benton: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Glendive: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Hamilton: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Hardin: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Harlowton: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Libby: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Livingston: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Miles City: $15,000 to complete a Water and Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Missoula: $15,000 to complete a Capital Improvements Plan.
• City of Plentywood: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Red Lodge: $15,000 to complete a Storm Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Roundup: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Scobey: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• City of Thompson Falls: $15,000 to complete a Capital Improvements Plan.
• City of Wolf Point: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report update.
• Clancy Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Cooke City Water District: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Coram County Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Custer County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Fergus County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Four Corners County Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Capital Improvements Plan.
• Gallatin County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Gardiner-Park County Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Jefferson County: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Lewis and Clark County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Lockwood Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Madison County: $10,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Missoula County: $10,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report for the Buena Vista Community.
• North Havre Water District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Park County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Power Teton County Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Roosevelt County: $15,000 to complete a Capital Improvement Plan.
• Sun Prairie County Water District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Sweet Grass County: $15,000 to complete a Bridge Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Ten Mile Pleasant Valley Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Cascade: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Circle: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Clyde Park: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Dodson: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Geraldine: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Hobson: $5,000 to complete a Capital Improvements Plan.
• Town of Hysham: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Lodge Grass: $8,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report update.
• Town of Manhattan: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Twin Bridges: $5,000 to complete a Capital Improvements Plan.
• Town of Valier: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Whitehall: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Wibaux: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Town of Winnett: $15,000 to complete a Wastewater System Preliminary Engineering Report update.
• Vaughn Cascade County Water and Sewer District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.
• Wilsall Water District: $15,000 to complete a Water System Preliminary Engineering Report.

Created in 1992, the state-funded TSEP program helps local governments with infrastructure planning as well as constructing or upgrading drinking water systems, wastewater treatment facilities, sanitary or storm sewer systems, solid waste disposal and separation systems, and bridges.
For more information, visit our website at: comdev.mt.gov/Programs/TSEP/PlanningGrants/Overview.

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Monday, February 12th 2018
2018 20th Annual Ice Fishing Derby Results
Press Release February 12, 2018
The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture held its 20th Annual Ice Fishing Derby at the Dredge Cuts Trout Pond at Fort Peck Lake on February 10th, 2018. It was a diehard day for the fishermen & women who chose to participate despite the sub zero temperatures.

The contest had 41 participants and 98 pre- drilled ice holes were sold. The contestants came from Glasgow, Sidney, St. Marie, Poplar, Wolf Point, Glendive, Nashua, Fort Peck, Scobey, Hinsdale, Minot ND, Gillette WY, and Carwright, ND. An estimated 50 more people came to observe the tournament and enjoy one of Chef Zak Peterson Famous brats & onions.

A total of over $3,000.00 in cash, prizes and raffles were awarded to the participants. The 50/50 was won by Spencer Marsh in the amount of $395.00. Mikel Erickson won the Yetti Cooler raffled off.

The results were: 1st-$2000.00 Todd LaPlant Glasgow-3.86 pound Northern - 2nd $500.00 Scott Sanders/Dan & Darcie Ellefson Glasgow 2.86 pound Northern, 3rd-$100.00 Dick Kline of Nashua 2.77 pound Northern. Additional door prizes were provided by the tournament sponsors.

The cash and prizes were awarded at The Gateway Club in Fort Peck following the derby. The 2018 Ice Derby was sponsored by: Edward Jones, JR's Party Store #24, Cottonwood Inn, Nemont Telephone, Coca-Cola, KLTZ/KLAN, First Community Bank, D & G Sports & Western, Thompson & Sons, Reynolds Market, Ezzie's Wholesale, Westend, Midtown, Nemont Beverage, Hi-Line Ford, Northern Prarie Auto, The Gateway Club, Valley Bank, Independence Bank, Lakeridge Lodging & Bait Shop, Farm Bureau Insurance/Shane Gibson, Glasgow Distributors and the Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture.

Monday, February 12th 2018
FWP, Fort Peck Chapter of Walleye's Unlimited to Host Ice Fishing Day On February 17
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and Fort Peck Chapter of Walleye's Unlimited, along with donations by D & G Sports and Western, will be hosting their free annual ice fishing event at Home Run Pond in Glasgow on Saturday, Feb. 17, from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.

Fishing will take place at Home Run Pond just southeast of Glasgow. Holes will be pre-drilled, and fishing poles, tackle, and bait will be provided at no cost, with free ice fishing rods handed out to kids until they are gone. In addition, hotdogs, chips, and hot chocolate will be provided at no cost, so come hungry!

This event is designed for youth, but all ages are welcome to attend. No fishing license is required by youth or adult.

Friday, February 9th 2018
Residents Reminded It's Unlawful To Put Snow In The Street
A reminder to residents that city ordinances spell out that it is unlawful for anyone to deposit snow, ice or slush from private property onto any city street, alley or right of way.

Violation of those provisions can carry expenses to the owner of the property, and if found guilty of violating the code, it is a punishable misdemeanor.

Also, the Glasgow Fire Department asks that you keep snow cleared away from fire hydrants; they recommend a diameter of about 3 feet.

Friday, February 9th 2018
Ice Fishing Derby Is This Saturday
The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Ag will hold the 20th Annual Ice Fishing Derby Sat. Feb. 10th.

The Derby will be held at the Fishing Access Site – the Dredge Cuts Trout Pond. Registration is from 10a.m. – 1p.m. with fishing from 12 – 3p.m.

Entry fee is $50 per hole or 3 holes for $100. Cash & prizes will be awarded at 4p.m. at the Gateway. Entry forms are available at the Glasgow Chamber office or online.

They are allowing pop-up tents & shelters on the ice this year, although no ATV’s or vehicles are allowed on the ice so shelters will have to be hauled by foot.

Friday, February 9th 2018
MonDak Pulse Day Is February 13th In Wolf Point
The 2018 MonDak Pulse Day, sponsored by MSU Extension & NDSU Extension, is Tues. Feb. 13th at the Elks Club in Wolf Point. Registration is $20 per person & begins at 8:30a.m.
Thursday, February 8th 2018
Latest On Winter Storm
(From the Glasgow office of the National Weather Service)
The winter storm is currently in progress across the region and is expected to deliver heavy snow at times this morning in some areas. The heaviest snowfall totally are expected in southwestern areas with lesser amounts to the northeast. As snow gradually exits from north to south tonight, wind chills will become an increasing concern as the next Arctic high pressure system builds in.

Steadiest snowfall rates expected between now and 12 PM today.
Highest snowfall amounts expected in Southwest Phillips, Petroleum, and Western Garfield Counties.
Heavy snow is also expected across most of Central and Southern Montana. See www.weather.gov/tfx and www.weather.gov/byz for specifics.
Lighter snowfall amounts are expected further northeast.
Temperatures will drop below zero area wide tonight with north winds around 10 mph at times.
Bitter cold wind chills of 15 to 30 below are possible at times tonight and Friday morning.

Impacts:
Snow covered roadways & blowing and drifting due to increasing northeast winds will create hazardous travel conditions today.
Frost bite can occur within 30 minutes on exposed skin tonight and Friday morning with the possible wind chills.

Latest Warnings & Advisories:
Winter Storm Warning for Phillips, Petroleum, Central & Southern Valley Counties until 6 AM Friday.
Winter Weather Advisory for Northern Valley, Western Roosevelt, McCone, Richland, Dawson, and Wibaux Counties until 6 AM Friday.

Confidence:
Heavy Snow: High
Bitter Cold Wind Chills: High

Wednesday, February 7th 2018
Snowpack Experts Have Cautious Optimism for Spring and Summer Water Supply Due to Above Normal Snowpack
BOZEMAN, Mont., Feb. 7, 2018 – The snowpack across Montana remains in good shape starting the month of February with all basins in the state at near to above normal for the date. In fact, Montana is the only state in the 12 western U.S. states where the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service measures snowpack in which all basins in the state have at least normal snowpack conditions on Feb 1.

“La Nina weather patterns this year have favored the northern tier states across the western U.S and so far Montana and Wyoming have been the big winners,” said Lucas Zukiewicz, NRCS water supply specialist for Montana.”

Building on a strong early season snowpack, the month of January provided consistent moisture to the basins in the state, although the approaching storms from the West Coast came in with above normal temperatures. Many mountain locations were 3 to 7 degrees F above average for the month of January, which resulted in a mix of snow and rain through the month west of the Divide. Mid-month the rain levels reached mid to high elevations, raining over an inch on the mountain snowpack in some locations.

“Even with the warmer than average weather, the mountain snowpack stood strong through the month with little to no discharge at water yielding elevations,” Zukiewicz said. “The water was stored in the snowpack until runoff in the spring, thanks to a cold snowpack in place from the month of December.”

The snowfall for the overall water year (October 1st – current) hasn’t been record breaking in most locations, but is has been above normal, according to NRCS data. However, Zukiewicz pointed out there are some records in central and southwest Montana. One SNOTEL site set a new Feb 1 record (Frohner Meadow SNOTEL) and eight other SNOTEL sites and snowcourses are recording the second highest snow water equivalent totals for the date. Percentage wise, the best snowpack in the state can be found in the Upper Clark Fork (140% of normal), Missouri Mainstem near Helena (148%), Upper Yellowstone (148%) and Gallatin River basins (129%).

All of this amounts to great information to water users in the state, but a healthy dose of caution is still warranted. “Getting complacent, or bragging about snowpack at the beginning of February would be like bragging about leading Daytona halfway through the race,” Zukiewicz said “It doesn’t matter where you are halfway through it, it matters where you’re at when it wraps up”.

Snowpack typically peaks across the state during April or May, depending on which region in the state you’re in. The coming months are critical for water supply, and in many basins east of the Divide the months of March, April and May typically provide significant precipitation.

“Should La Nina and associated weather patterns continue to favor the state with above normal snowfall, or even normal snowfall from this point, water supply could be more than adequate for irrigation and recreation this summer,” Zukiewicz said “But, if the pattern takes a turn, and the snow faucet shuts off, the prospects of our water supply would be diminshed.”

Snowpack will continue to be closely monititored through the spring by the NRCS. The next snowpack and water supply update will be issued during the first week in March.

Tuesday, February 6th 2018
Save the Date – Hi-Line Sportsmen Banquet is Feb. 24
Save the date and plan to attend the 2nd annual conservation fundraising dinner hosted by the Hi-Line Sportsmen on Saturday evening, Feb. 24 at Glasgow’s St. Raphael’s Parish Center gymnasium.

Tickets for the banquet are limited in number and are available from more than a dozen members of the local chapter committee. Deadline to purchase early-bird tickets—which include a chance to win two tickets to the John Michael Montgomery concert at this summer’s NE Montana Fair—is Feb. 12.

Doors open on Feb. 24 at 4:30 p.m. for drinks and games. A prime rib dinner with all the trimmings will be served starting at 6 p.m.

Single tickets cost $30 and couples tickets are $50. Sponsor couples tickets are $200, and include a chance at a sponsor gun. Or get a group of friends together and buy a sponsor table for 8 for $800. Sponsor tables get a gun to give away to tablemates.

The banquet features a wide variety of art, home furnishings and décor, raffle prizes for women and youngsters, an extensive silent auction, and plenty of sporting goods on the general raffle. In addition, over a dozen guns and hunting bows will be auctioned or raffled over the course of the evening. Special items include the final team spot in this summer’s Milk River Catfish Classic fishing tournament, an AR-15 with the Hi-Line Sportsmen logo, and a semi-guided youth turkey hunt in Nebraska.

All funds from the banquet stay in the local community. Hi-Line Sportsmen is a non-profit conservation group committed to improving wildlife habitat, sportsmen access, and passing on sporting traditions in Valley County and neighboring counties.

Proceeds from last year’s inaugural banquet were used to fund scholarships for college-bound sportspeople, purchase bows for the National Archery in the Schools Program, fund materials to make gate closers for landowners who provide hunting access, host a public sight-in day prior to hunting season, provide targets for the local archery range, and help host a youth field day.

For more information on the Feb. 24 banquet and Hi-Line Sportsmen, visit the group’s Facebook page, or call Jennifer Jackson at 263-7339, Jace Ball at 230-0833, Ed Sugg at 230-2033, or Arron Franzen at 406-925-0777.
Monday, February 5th 2018
Todd Young Files For Valley County Commissioner
On Monday, KLTZ/Mix-93 received word that Todd Young has filed to run for Valley County Commissioner.

He joins the other candidates who have already filed: Michael Carney, Arlie Gordon, Jim Uphaus and Rene Clampitt.

There will be both a primary and general election for the position.

Treasurer: Brenda Anderson

Valley County Attorney: Dylan Jensen

Valley County Sheriff/Coroner: Lucas Strommen

Valley County Clerk and Recorder: Taryn Stebleton and Ruth Dowell

Valley County Justice of the Peace: Christina Hillman

Monday, February 5th 2018
Area Residents Reminded To Be Aware Of IRS Scams
As tax season nears, fraudulent phone calls are increasing in volume. Local tax professionals & the Valley County Sheriff’s Department remind you that the IRS will not contact you via telephone. If you get a phone call from someone claiming to be with the IRS, do not give any financial information or pay any money.
Monday, February 5th 2018
“Vote Yes” Valley View Home Meetings Start This Week
There will be “Vote Yes” Valley View Home meetings to learn more about the upcoming vote this spring, as well as the future of Valley View Home in Glasgow & what we need to do to keep it a vibrant part of our community.
Thurs. 2/8 Lustre Christian High School 4p.m.
Hinsdale American Legion 6:30p.m.
Mon. 2/12 Valley View Home, Glasgow 6p.m.
Thurs. 2/15 Nashua Senior Citizen Center 6:30p.m.
Tues. 2/20 Frazer High School 3p.m.
Fort Peck Interpretive Center 6p.m.
Mon. 2/26 St. Marie Town Hall 6p.m.
Thurs. 3/15 Valley View Home, Glasgow 6p.m.
Mon. 3/19 Opheim Community Church 6:30p.m.
Monday, February 5th 2018
Ice Fishing Derby Is Saturday
The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Ag will hold the 20th Annual Ice Fishing Derby Sat. Feb. 10th.

The Derby will be held at the Fishing Access Site – the Dredge Cuts Trout Pond. Registration is from 10a.m. – 1p.m. with fishing from 12 – 3p.m.

The entry fee is $50 per hole or 3 holes for $100. Cash & prizes will be awarded at 4p.m. at the Gateway.

They are allowing pop-up tents & shelters on the ice this year, although no ATV’s or vehicles are allowed on the ice so shelters will have to be hauled by foot.

Entry forms are available at the Glasgow Chamber office or online, www.glasgowchamber.net.

Friday, February 2nd 2018
Agencies, watershed groups and tribal reps take aim at mussel protections in Missouri River Basin
LEWISTOWN, Mont. – Armed with a grant from the National Invasive Species Council, a broad coalition of Montana agencies, watershed groups and Tribal representatives convened a workshop Jan. 29, 2018, in Lewistown to map out plans for improving the state’s ability to prevent and manage invasive mussels in the Missouri River Basin.

“While a good deal of the AIS prevention efforts to date have been focused west of the Continental Divide, we’re obviously just as concerned about introductions to the east,” said Steve Wanderaas, Supervisor at the McCone County Conservation District and vice chair of the Montana Invasive Species Council. “This is a dynamic group of partners committed to ensuring an introduction doesn’t happen on our watch.”

The workshop was sponsored by the Montana Invasive Species Council and is part of a larger pilot project in the Missouri Basin to learn from the 2016 detections of mussel larvae in Tiber and Canyon Ferry reservoirs.

“The goals include improving coordination between the state and its partners, developing a strategic plan, assessing the economic impacts of a mussel infestation, and augmenting the state’s Early Detection and Rapid Response Guidelines with measures specific to the Missouri Basin,” said Wanderaas.

The pilot project, to be led by the Montana Invasive Species Council, includes a wide range of partners: Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, the Missouri River Conservation Districts Council, Musselshell Water Coalition, the Milk River Watershed Alliance, the Cascade Conservation District, the Blackfeet Nation, the Lower Musselshell Conservation District, Petroleum County Conservation District, the Bighorn River Alliance, Big Sky Watershed Corps members, and federal agencies in the basin.

In response to mussel detections in two eastern reservoirs last year, the Central and Eastern Montana Mussel Response Team was formed to assess the risk of invasive mussels to eastern waterways, and to provide recommendations to the state on better protecting the basin. The Missouri River pilot project will build on these efforts to strengthen protections and enhance collaboration between partners.

“The Missouri River Basin is a major economic driver in the state of Montana, including hydropower, irrigation and providing countless recreational opportunities for residents and visitors,” said Missouri River Conservation Districts Council Coordinator Rachel Frost. “An infestation has the potential to threaten our waters, communities, and very way of life – we are here to do everything we can to protect our freshwater resources for present and future generations.”

For more information on the Montana Invasive Species Council, visit: http://dnrc.mt.gov/divisions/cardd/montana-invasive-species-program/misc . To see the Central and Eastern Montana Mussel Response Team recommendations, see: http://missouririvercouncil.info/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/CEMTMusselResponseReporttoFWP.pdf .
Monday, January 29th 2018
Local Employers Offer Scholarship
The Glasgow Job Service Employers' Committee (JSEC) is offering scholarships to Valley County high school seniors who wish to further their education after graduation.

Funding is provided by Valley County employers who share the JSEC desire to educate future workers.

Applications can be picked up from any of the County's five high school counselors or the City of Glasgow, 319 3rd Street South. Applications are due in the City of Glasgow office by 5:00 pm Thursday, March 1, 2018.

Award amounts vary depending on donations received, but typically are about $500. For more information, contact Stacey at 228-2476 Ext. 1.

Monday, January 29th 2018
Valley County Conservation District Election Set For 2018
Election of three supervisors to represent the Valley County Conservation District will be held in conjunction with the County’s general election this November.

Incumbents whose term expires at the end of 2018 are: Jody Mason of Richland--Areas 1; Ron Stoneberg of Hinsdale—Area 3; and Gene Granada of Frazer—Area 5 (see designated areas on map).

Declaration for candidacy form can be picked up at the Valley County Courthouse Clerk and Recorder’s Office. The deadline for filing is March 12. No filing fee is required as there is no salary connected with the office of supervisors. These nonpartisan positions serve four-year terms.
According to a residency ordinance passed by the District in 1988, the candidate is required to live within the designated boundary of the area he or she is to represent. However, any qualified voter within the Conservation District is eligible to vote for each of the designated candidates on the election ballots.

Born of the Dust Bowl days in the 1930s, the conservation district is a legal subdivision of the state government responsible under state laws for conservation work within its boundaries. The purpose of the District is to focus on protection of soil, water and land-related resources, to develop programs to solve problems, and to enlist and coordinate assistance from all public and private sources that can contribute to accomplishing the District’s goals.

The Valley County Conservation District currently has a full seven-member board. In addition to the three supervisors up for re-election, serving Area 2 is Jeff Pattison (board chairman) and Area 4 Ron Garwood, both of whose terms expire in 2020. Two Urban Supervisors have been appointed to represent Opheim (Hanna Redfield) and Fort Peck (Nancy Heins). The City of Glasgow is excluded from the boundary of the Conservation District.

The District holds board meetings on the second Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the USDA Service Center in Glasgow. Recent activities include hosting a winter grazing seminar last January; hosting fifth graders of Valley County area schools to the annual Outdoor Classroom in May; growing a variety of trees on a demonstration tree plot; renting out no-till drill and post pounder; administering 310 permit; coordinating with various agencies on fire and bison issues; requesting the Montana Fish & Wildlife Commission to declare the wolf a predator in Valley County; and hosting educational workshops on soil health, windbreaks, and water rights.

For more information on the function of the conservation district, please call 228-4321 ext. 101, email vccdmt20@gmail.com, or stop by the office at the USDA Service Center on US Highway 2 West, Glasgow.

Friday, January 26th 2018
Jim Uphaus files for Valley County Commissioner
Here are the full filings:


Valley County Commissioner: Michael Carney, Arlie Gordon, Jim Uphaus and Rene Clampitt

Treasurer: Brenda Anderson

Valley County Attorney: Dylan Jensen

Valley County Sheriff/Coroner: Lucas Strommen

Valley County Clerk and Recorder: Taryn Stebleton and Ruth Dowell

Valley County Justice of the Peace: Christina Hillman

Wednesday, January 24th 2018
Recent Awards Made by GHS Educational Trust
As the Spring 2018 semester gets under way, five more Glasgow High School graduates attending college or trade school will have help with their tuition and fees, thanks to the generous supporters of the Glasgow High School Educational Trust. This trust, which was established by the GHS Class of 1938 in 1964 to help local students attain higher education, has awarded $2,019,000.00 to 710 different students since its inception. Many of these students have received multiple awards over their courses of study, helping them to achieve their educational dreams and minimize their student debt.

With a corpus of over $6 million dollars, the trust uses its interest to award financial aid to eligible students through a semi-annual application process administered by the trustees. All GHS graduates who have completed one year of college or one semester of trade school, are attending full time either on campus or online, are in good academic standing, and are showing steady progress toward the completion of a degree are eligible to apply. Applications must be complete and submitted on time to be considered. The deadline for requesting financial aid for both semesters of the school year is July 1st or October 15th, if applying for aid for the spring semester only. The application and additional information about the trust are available on the trust's website at ghsedutrust.org.

In addition to the gifts made to students, the trust also purchases equipment and programs for Glasgow High School that cannot be financed within the school's regular budget. From the auditorium to the track, the welding program to the science department, gifts from the trust help GHS prepare students for the 21st century. In total, the trust has given 118 gifts to GHS to enhance the education of all students. The dollar value of these awards is $232, 517.80. The public at large also benefits from these gifts when it attends events at the school or uses its facilities.

Although the trust has received numerous large gifts of cash, stock, and real estate over the years, equally important have been the smaller gifts given steadily by hundreds of faithful supporters across the nation. Whenever the trust receives donations in the name of a particular individual that total $500 in value, a gift is given to a student or GHS in memory, honor, or recognition of that person. Donations of $10,000 or more in the name of a particular person entitle the donor to an annual naming opportunity in perpetuity.

At its recent meeting, the trust made awards to the following individuals for the Spring 2018 semester:

First-time recipients: Chase Hughes, MSU-Bozeman, IHO Dorothy Kolstad; Jacob Page, UM-Missoula, IMO Leonard and Margery Bollinger; Joshua Schack, Helena College, IMO Lois Markle; Jason Thibault, Dickinson State University, IMO Gary Mott;
Second-time recipient:
Jake Hentges, MSU-Northern, IMO Hammerness Family.

Wednesday, January 24th 2018
20th Annual Ice Fishing Derby Is February 10
PRESS RELEASE
FROM: The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture
The "Cabin Fever-Let's Go Fishing"

The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture will hold the 20th Annual Ice Fishing Derby February 10, 2018. The Derby will be held at the Fishing Access Site-The Dredge Cuts Trout Pond located on Highway 117. Registration is from 10AM-1P. Fishing is from 12-3PM, the ENTRY FEE is $50 per Hole or 3 Holes for $100. Cash and prizes will be awarded at 4:00pm at the Gateway. There are over 200 holes pre-drilled for the anglers.

First place is GUARANTEED for $2,000. The first and largest fish of walleye, northern pike, yellow perch, carp, sucker, burbot, lake trout or bass weighing in wins. You must have a current MT fishing license to participate. In 2017, over $5,000 in cash and prizes was awarded. A YETTI cooler is being raffled off and will be drawn for at the Gateway Bar. Hot cocoa, coffee, hot dogs and bratwursts, onions & kraut will be for sale during the Derby. The ladies will also be holding the 50/50 drawing.

The tournament is sponsored by Nemont Beverage, Glasgow Distributors, Nemont, Coca Cola, Hi-Line Ford, D&G Sports & Western, Cotttonwood Inn, KLTZ/KLAN, First Community Bank, Ezzie's Wholesale, Midtown & Westend Convenience, Reynolds Market, Valley Bank, JR's Party Store #24, , The Gateway Club, Independence Bank, Farm Bureau Insurance, The Lakeridge Lodge and Bait Shop, Thompson & Sons, Edward Jones, and Northern Prarie Auto.

Entry forms are available at the Glasgow Chamber office, 406-228-2222 or online at www.glasgowchamber.net . Bring the kids, sleds, skates and bait for a fun Ice Day at Fort Peck Lake MT. Join us for an afternoon of fishing and fun.

Wednesday, January 24th 2018
Applications Now Available For This Year’s VCCF Grants
Applications for this year’s grants from the Valley County Community Foundation are now available, VCCF board member Sam Waters announced this week. All applications are due by March 13.

VCCF provides grants to organizations within Valley County with the charitable 501(c) 3 IRS designation, along with local government and educational institutions. Specifically, VCCF awards grants in these areas: arts and culture, basic human needs, economic development, education, and natural resources and conservation.

Last year, VCCF awarded $22,390 in grants to 12 organizations, bringing the total of all grants given since 2000 to $178,234, Waters said, adding that projects in all parts of Valley County have received grants.

“Many organizations receive full funding for their projects and others receive a substantial amount of the dollars requested,” Waters said. The average dollar amount of grants awarded in the past three years is just over $1,900, with the smallest grant at $691 and the largest, $3,600.”

Application forms and guidelines are available at the VCCF website. Hard copy applications are required and they must be postmarked by March 13. Only applications that are complete and received by the due date will be considered.

“Over the years, competition for grant dollars has increased, making complete and timely grant applications a necessity,” Waters said.

Funding for the grants comes from earnings on the VCCF endowment. It is invested with the Montana Community Foundation, a statewide organization that helps local communities and non-profit organizations raise and administer charitable gifts.

VCCF is also caretaker for two annual scholarships. The Feda Scholarship for the Trades will be awarded in May and the Charlotte and Clarence Fuhrman Memorial Scholarship will be awarded this summer. Check the VCCF website for application requirements and due dates.

Tuesday, January 23rd 2018
Wolf Point Man Selected To Participate In NASA Program
Poplar – Pryce Paulson of FPCC in Wolf Point has been selected to travel to NASA’s Johnson Space Center this winter to participate in the NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars (NCAS) onsite experience.

Paulson has been selected as one of 171 community college students from across the U.S. to be part of the NCAS onsite experience.

The five-week online activity culminates with a four-day on-site event at a NASA Center and offers students the opportunity to interact with NASA engineers and others as they learn more about careers in science and engineering. While at NASA, students form teams and establish fictional companies interested in Mars exploration. Each team is responsible for developing and testing a prototype rover, forming a company infrastructure, managing a budget, and developing communications and outreach.

The onsite experience at NASA includes briefings by NASA subject matter experts, information on how to apply for internships and a tour of NASA’s unique facilities.

NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars is an activity funded in part by the Minority University Research and Education Program, or MUREP, which is committed to engaging underrepresented and underserved students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in authentic learning experiences to sustain a diverse workforce.

With this activity, NASA continues the agency’s tradition engaging the nation in NASA’s mission.

“NCAS not only inspires community college students to advance in STEM fields, but it also opens doors for future careers at NASA. NCAS has a legacy of alumni moving from NASA internships to and ultimately entering the NASA workforce. It is rewarding to see the progression of a student from NCAS participant to NASA colleague,” Joeletta Patrick, Minority University Research and Education Project (MUREP) Manager

For additional information, please contact National Community College Aerospace Scholars by email at JSC-NCAS@mail.nasa.gov or by phone at 281-483-0493. For more information, visit:

http://ncas.aerospacescholars.org/

For more on MUREP visit:

www.nasa.gov/education/murep
Monday, January 22nd 2018
Additional Filings For Political Offices In Valley County
There have been additional filings for political offices in Valley County. Ruth Dowell has filed for Valley County Clerk and Recorder and Christina Hillman has filed for Valley County Justice of the Peace.

Here are the full filings:


Valley County Commissioner: Michael Carney, Arlie Gordon and Rene Clampitt

Treasurer: Brenda Anderson

Valley County Attorney: Dylan Jensen

Valley County Sheriff/Coroner: Lucas Strommen

Valley County Clerk and Recorder: Taryn Stebleton and Ruth Dowell

Valley County Justice of the Peace: Christina Hillman

Thursday, January 18th 2018
TransCanada Clears Hurdle To Construct Keystone XL Oil Pipeline
TransCanada Corp. has enough customer interest to go forward with the Keystone XL oil pipeline, if the company decides to build it.

The Calgary-based company now has "approximately 500,000 barrels per day of firm, 20-year commitments,” according to a statement on Thursday. The pipeline operator will continue to secure additional volumes.


The announcement marks yet another hurdle overcome for the project, first proposed in 2008. In November, TransCanada received state approval in Nebraska to construct the conduit there along an alternate route, a decision that may spur added legal action by foes who say the new path hasn’t received the same review as the original plan. So far, the company hasn’t yet officially green-lighted the project, a spokesman said.

"We are progressing toward a final investment decision,” Terry Cunha, a spokesman for TransCanada, said in an emailed statement. "We continue to work through internal milestones to construct and put into service this important infrastructure project."


The company said in its statement it is working with landowners along the new path to obtain the necessary easements. Construction preparation has begun, the company said, with primary work potentially coming in 2019.

Keystone XL would be a victory for Canadian oil sands producers who are facing transportation bottlenecks getting their crude to market.

The pipeline would ship 830,000 barrels of crude a day from Hardisty, Alberta, through Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska, where it would connect to TransCanada’s existing Keystone system that carries crude to the U.S. Gulf Coast hub of refineries and export terminals.


“Over the last 12 months, the Keystone XL project has achieved several milestones that move us significantly closer to constructing this critical energy infrastructure for North America," Russ Girling, TransCanada’s chief executive officer, said in the statement.

Keystone XL drew fierce opposition from environmentalists concerned about climate change and landowners along the path in Nebraska. Former President Barack Obama rejected TransCanada’s application in 2015, saying that it wasn’t in the national interest. That decision was reversed by the Trump administration.

Monday, January 15th 2018
Think You Know Who Receives Your Property When You Pass Away? Think again...
Marsha Goetting, MSU Bozeman to Appear in Glasgow.

Do you know who will receive your property if you pass away without an estate plan? Do you know when wills or trusts have control over property and when they don't? Dr. Marsha Goetting, Montana State University Extension Family Economics Specialist answers these questions and also explores how you can avoid probate with payable on death designations (PODs), transfer on death registrations (TODs), and other beneficiary designations. Estate Planning provides many options on how to structure your future wishes.

Dr. Marsha Goetting will be in Glasgow January 27, 2018 and provide two informational workshops one focusing specifically on wills and trusts and another basic level workshop for those interested in the estate planning process. She will also highlight the Beneficiary Deed law that allows a Montanan’s to pass real property to your heirs without probate. She will provide illustrations of how your property is titled impacts who receives it upon your death.

Will and Trusts will begin at 10:00 a.m. in the Valley County Courthouse. Her Estate Planning program will begin at 1:00 also in the Courthouse. A light lunch will be served between the two programs. Dr. Goetting is also offering to meet with individuals or families on a one on one basis to discuss your specific situation. She stresses that she does not offer legal advice, but can offer ideas and options to consider. Registration for both seminars as well as these appointments may be set up prior to January 27 by calling the Valley County Extension office. 228-6241

Dr. Marsha A. Goetting is a Professor and Extension Family Economics Specialist at Montana State University in Bozeman. During the past six years she has presented over 330 educational sessions reaching over 11,500 Montanans with financial and estate planning information. She has also authored over 76 MontGuides and bulletins and has received national, regional, and state awards for her financial management and estate planning programs. Dr. Goetting received her Bachelors and Master’s degrees in Family Economics and Adult Education from Kansas State University and her PhD from Iowa State University. Please contact the Valley County Extension Office for more information. 228-6241

Friday, January 12th 2018
Plenty of candidates file on first day of filing for county elected office
Thursday was the first day of filing for political office for the 2018 political season and due to several retirements, there are some open seats in county government.

Lynne Nyquist has announced she is retiring after 20 years as the elected Valley County Clerk and Recorder. She will serve until the end of 2018.

Bruce Peterson will retire at the end of his term in December as Valley County Commissioner representing District #3.

The filings on Thursday:

Valley County Commissioner: Michael Carney, Arlie Gordon and Rene Clampitt

Treasurer: Brenda Anderson

Valley County Attorney: Dylan Jensen

Valley County Sheriff/Coroner: Lucas Strommen

Valley County Clerk and Recorder: Taryn Stebleton

Thursday, January 11th 2018
Salvation Army Bell Ringing A Success
Glasgow Kiwanis and the Ministerial Association send out a big THANK YOU to the Valley County Community and Shopko for the generous support of the Salvation Army bell ringing campaign. A total of $5,900 was raised to fund local families and individuals. All of the money raised stays in the local area.

Volunteers from the churches, Kiwanis, and the local community braved the frigid temperatures to ring the bell on weekends between Thanksgiving and Christmas at the Glasgow Shopko. These volunteers are the force that makes the bell ringing campaign a success.

The Salvation Army bell ringing program was started in 1895 with a mission to feed the homeless in San Francisco. The Valley County program is administered locally by area churches with oversight provided by the Denver Salvation Army. Kiwanis assists the Ministerial Association in the staffing of the bell ringing and collects the buckets for deposits. Money raised supports needy families and individuals that request assistance through the churches.

The 2017 total of $5,900 is up substantially from recent years. Again, Thank You to the volunteers and all who donated so generously.

Thursday, January 11th 2018
2018 Political Season Starts Today
The 2018 political season starts today with filing open for political offices on the statewide and county levels.

In Valley County there are a full set of offices that are up for election this year:

Valley County Commissioner
Valley County Clerk and Recorder/Supt. of Schools
Valley County Sheriff/Coroner
Valley County Attorney
Valley County Public Administrator
Valley County Justice of the Peace.

Filing opens today and will continue to be open until March 12th.

Wednesday, January 10th 2018
Glasgow Chamber Has Successful Holiday Season With Community Cash Program
The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture had a very successful holiday season with its Annual Community Cash program.

The Community Cash Script was available starting on October 16, 2017 at First Community Bank in Glasgow/Hinsdale, Valley Bank and Independence Bank. The purpose of the Community Cash program is to encourage people in our area to “Shop Locally”. The Glasgow merchants offer a variety of quality products along with outstanding customer service.

In 2017, 64 Chamber business members participated in the program with 82 loans totaling $75,090 from Valley Bank, 35 loans totaling $26,6500 from FCB, and 18 loans totaling $16,600 from Independence Bank for a total of $118,340 dollars Spent Locally!

The Chamber Big Bucks program was also very successful. From October 16th thru December 31st, 2017 alone over $19,710 of Chamber Big Bucks was purchased from the Chamber office. With both programs $138,050 was spent LOCALLY during the 2017 Holiday season in Glasgow. The Chamber thanks everybody for participating in these programs and supporting our local merchants! “BUY LOCALLY AND THE BUCK STAYS HERE”

Wednesday, January 10th 2018
Glasgow TBID Looking For Proposal On Welcome Sign In Glasgow
Glasgow Tourism Business Improvement District is looking for a proposal to design and produce a metal image/lettering to affix to the large rocks that are placed in concrete adjacent to Highway Two on the east and west side of Glasgow.

Interested artists/metal fabricators are asked to submit two or three designs using the new Glasgow logo and incorporating the words “Welcome” and “Glasgow”. Designs along with suggested materials and total cost for both signs (design, materials, and installation) should be mailed to Glasgow Chamber, PO Box 832, Glasgow, Montana 59230 or dropped off at the Glasgow Chamber Office by noon on March 2, 2018. The signs must be installed by May 1, 2018.

Requirements: Must be a permanent/low maintenance material affixed to the rocks
Must be easily visible – we are looking to replace the metal on the west end to be something that stands out more and is readable from the highway

Sign dimensions must be included in the bid – measurements and photos of the rocks can be obtained by e-mailing chamber@nemont.net

The TBID board reserves the right to select the best suited design and will consider qualifications, previous projects, ability to meet the timeline, and price.

Tuesday, January 9th 2018
Region 6 Citizen Advisory Committee Meets January 18 at Fort Peck Multispecies Fish Hatchery
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Region 6 Citizen Advisory Committee (CAC) will meet from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 18, at the Fort Peck Multispecies Fish Hatchery, located at 277 Montana Highway 117, just north of Fort Peck, MT.

The meeting is open to the public, and will include updates on chronic wasting disease and aquatic invasive species in the state, and fisheries and law enforcement updates.

Each of FWP’s seven administrative regions has a volunteer CAC to help guide policies and programs. The Region 6 group meets three times a year. For more information about the Region 6 Citizen Advisory Committee, visit the FWP Web site at fwp.mt.gov/regions/r6/cac/ .

FWP ensures that its meetings are fully accessible to persons with disabilities. To request special accommodations for this meeting, please contact 406-228-3700.
Tuesday, January 9th 2018
Region 6 Hunting Season Proposals For 2018-2019 To Be Discussed At Four Meetings Across Northeast Montana
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks will hold four public meetings in northeast Montana in January to gather comments on proposed hunting seasons and rules for the next two years. In addition, updated information will be presented on Chronic Wasting Disease, which has recently been detected in the state. Interested hunters are encouraged to attend these meetings to hear the proposals, ask questions, and make comments.

The tentative rules and regulations, available for review and comment online now at fwp.mt.gov, were approved by the Fish and Wildlife Commission at their December meeting, and include statewide and local hunting regulations for all big game, migratory birds, and upland game birds.

Every two years FWP considers changes to all hunting seasons, proposes changes from the previous biennium, and encourages public comment before the Fish and Wildlife Commission makes its final decisions in February. Public meetings are held across the state to present the proposed seasons and accept public comments. FWP and its commissioners will also accept written, online or emailed comments through Jan. 24.

Some of the proposed hunting season and rules changes, relevant to Region 6, include: lengthening the elk shoulder seasons in the Missouri River Breaks and Bears Paw Mountains, additional mule deer and white-tailed deer antlerless B-licenses, changes to the archery antelope license drawing process, and expansion of the youth deer season.

The public is encouraged to visit the FWP website for the full proposals or attend a public meeting. In northeast Montana, all public meetings are scheduled for 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the following dates and locations:
Glasgow Mon., Jan. 8, Cottonwood Inn
Malta Thurs., Jan. 11, Malta High School cafeteria
Havre Tues., Jan. 16, Hill County Electric, hospitality room
Plentywood Wed., Jan. 17, Sheridan Co. Courthouse, Jubilee Room

Comments may be submitted at these public meetings, online at fwp.mt.gov, or by mail to: FWP Wildlife Division, “attn: hunting season proposals,” PO Box 200701, Helena, MT 59620. Comments are due by 5 p.m. on Jan. 24, 2018. If there are any questions about the Region 6 meetings, please call the Region 6 Headquarters in Glasgow at 406-228-3700.

Monday, January 8th 2018
Region 6 Hunting Season Proposals for 2018-2019 to be Discussed at Four Meetings across Northeast Montana
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks will hold four public meetings in northeast Montana in January to gather comments on proposed hunting seasons and rules for the next two years. In addition, updated information will be presented on Chronic Wasting Disease, which has recently been detected in the state. Interested hunters are encouraged to attend these meetings to hear the proposals, ask questions, and make comments.

The tentative rules and regulations, available for review and comment online now at fwp.mt.gov, were approved by the Fish and Wildlife Commission at their December meeting, and include statewide and local hunting regulations for all big game, migratory birds, and upland game birds.

Every two years FWP considers changes to all hunting seasons, proposes changes from the previous biennium, and encourages public comment before the Fish and Wildlife Commission makes its final decisions in February. Public meetings are held across the state to present the proposed seasons and accept public comments. FWP and its commissioners will also accept written, online or emailed comments through Jan. 24.

Some of the proposed hunting season and rules changes, relevant to Region 6, include: lengthening the elk shoulder seasons in the Missouri River Breaks and Bears Paw Mountains, additional mule deer and white-tailed deer antlerless B-licenses, changes to the archery antelope license drawing process, and expansion of the youth deer season.

The public is encouraged to visit the FWP website for the full proposals or attend a public meeting. In northeast Montana, all public meetings are scheduled for 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the following dates and locations:

• Glasgow Mon., Jan. 8, Cottonwood Inn
• Malta Thurs., Jan. 11, Malta High School cafeteria
• Havre Tues., Jan. 16, Hill County Electric, hospitality room
• Plentywood Wed., Jan. 17, Sheridan Co. Courthouse, Jubilee Room

Comments may be submitted at these public meetings, online at fwp.mt.gov, or by mail to: FWP Wildlife Division, “attn: hunting season proposals,” PO Box 200701, Helena, MT 59620. Comments are due by 5 p.m. on Jan. 24, 2018. If there are any questions about the Region 6 meetings, please call the Region 6 Headquarters in Glasgow at 406-228-3700.

Thursday, January 4th 2018
Corps: Missouri River Power Generation Up In 2017

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says electric power generation from the Missouri River's six upstream dams increased 23 percent in 2017.

The agency manages dams and reservoirs along the 2,341-mile river. Corps engineer Mike Swenson says energy production from the dams in the Dakotas, Montana and Nebraska totaled 9.6 billion kilowatts of electricity last year, up from 7.6 billion kilowatts.

He says a billion kilowatt-hours of power is enough to supply about 86,000 homes for a year.

The Western Area Power Administration sells the power generated from the dams to rural electric cooperatives, municipal utilities, Indian tribes and other customers.

But the power created last year wasn't enough to satisfy customers' contracts and WAPA had to purchase $28.3 million of electricity on the open market.

Thursday, January 4th 2018
Valley County High School Seniors Encouraged To Apply For Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship
All Valley County high school seniors are eligible to apply for a substantial college scholarship that will be awarded in February by the Hi-Line Sportsmen.

Scholarship winners will be announced at the conservation group’s annual fundraising banquet, scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 24, 2018 at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church’s parish hall in Glasgow. Over the past four years, a total of $10,000 has been awarded to 10 Barb Marsh Scholars.

In keeping with the wildlife-conservation mission of the Hi-Line Sportsmen, scholarship applicants must possess a valid Montana hunting license. Other considerations are community service and participation in hunting and conservation-oriented activities. Application deadline for the scholarship is Feb. 2, 2018.

The scholarship is presented in memory of Barb Marsh, a longtime supporter of wildlife conservation and local youth, who died unexpectedly in January 2014. Each year since her death, Barb’s partner, Joe Younkin, has sponsored a special rifle that is auctioned at the conservation banquet. Proceeds from the previous year’s auction are distributed to eligible high school students the following year. The amount of the scholarship varies from year to year since it is dependent on funds raised by the auction, but in previous years, multiple $1,000 scholarships have been awarded to college-bound Valley County high schoolers.

Younkin has donated another firearm to the Hi-Line Sportsmen’s 2018 banquet that will fund 2019 scholarships. Plan to attend the Feb. 24 banquet to bid on the special scholarship gun—a Henry Golden Boy lever-action .22 rifle—as well as other firearms, sporting goods, and products donated by local businesses, and to recognize the recipients of the 2018 Barb Marsh Memorial Scholarship.

For details about eligibility and other information about the scholarship, students are encouraged to visit with career counselors at high schools in Glasgow, Nashua, Frazer, Hinsdale, Opheim, and Lustre.

Call Jenn Jackson at 263-7339 or email Jackson at jennjenn910@gmail.com for information about both the scholarship and the banquet, which raises funds for local wildlife conservation, outdoor recreation, youth events, and our hunting heritage.
Wednesday, January 3rd 2018
Glasgow City Council Rejects Permit For Animal Rescue Shelter
On a vote of 4-1 the Glasgow City Council rejected a permit which would of allowed a Animal Rescue Shelter located at 812 5th Avenue North. The permit was put forth by Cindy Ramsbacher of Northeast Montana Pet Rescue.

The council chambers were packed with neighbors who voiced their opposition to the rescue shelter. Many neighbors spoke of the fear of barking dogs, the odor of dog feces and the possibility of declining property values with a animal shelter located in the neighborhood.

The City of Glasgow ordinance allows the operation of a animal rescue shelter in the city limits with strict limitations. The ordinance requires verification of current rabies vaccinations for each animal held in the facility, the size of the animal shelter determines how many animals may be sheltered and the facility must be non-profit. Other requirements include the shelter may not accept any animals outside of Valley County and the facility must provide an appropriate fenced area in which the animals may be placed for exercise.

With the rejection of the shelter permit, the city of Glasgow currently has no animal rescue shelter.

Many neighbors said they weren't against a shelter but thought it should be located outside of the city limits.

Thursday, December 28th 2017
New Year's Eve Rides Available
Valley County Search & Rescue along with the local wrecker services, Thompson & Sons, Glenn's Automotive, Hi-Line Collision, will be giving rides again this New Year's Eve.

Names & Numbers of those donating their services are:
Whiskey Isakson, SAR, 263-2505
Jeron Wesen, SAR, 263-0265
Dave Ahlstedt, SAR, 270-6215
Cat Fisher, SAR, 648-7357

Tom Pewitt, Hi-Line Collision, 263-2154

Tom & Dawn Thompson, Thompson & Sons, 263-7265

Doug Cook, Glenn's Automotive, 263-1249 (Nashua, Park Grove & Fort Peck Area)

The DUI Task force and Nemont Beverage are donating funds to make this possible

Thursday, December 28th 2017
Winter Storm To Hit Montana - Winter Weather Advisory Underway For Northeast Montana
...WIND CHILL ADVISORY NOW IN EFFECT UNTIL 11 AM MST FRIDAY...
...WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY NOW IN EFFECT FROM 5 PM THIS AFTERNOON
TO 5 PM MST SATURDAY...

* WHAT...Very cold wind chills expected. Snow expected. Plan on difficult travel conditions. Expect wind chills to range from 10 below zero to 35 below zero. Total snow accumulations of 4 to 6 inches, with localized amounts up to 10 inches, are expected.

* WHERE...Portions of northeast Montana.

* WHEN...For the Wind Chill Advisory, until 11 AM MST Friday. For the Winter Weather Advisory, from 5 PM this afternoon to 5 PM MST Saturday.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...The cold wind chills will cause frostbite in as little as 30 minutes to exposed skin. Be prepared for reduced visibilities at times.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...

A Wind Chill Advisory means that cold air and the wind will combine to create low wind chills. Frost bite and hypothermia can occur if precautions are not taken. Make sure you wear a hat and gloves.

A Winter Weather Advisory for snow means periods of snow will cause primarily travel difficulties. Be prepared for snow covered roads and limited visibilities, and use caution while driving. The latest road conditions for the state you are calling from can be obtained by calling 5 1 1.

Thursday, December 28th 2017
A Very Cold And Possibly Snowy Weekend Ahead
Confidence continues to improve for the next snow storm set to impact many locations across northeast Montana. This storm will largely be driven by the Canadian arctic low pressure system pushing a disturbance along the NW flow aloft over the region. Enough moisture and dynamic forcing will be in place to allow repeated periods of snowfall to develop and spread through many portions of NE Montana.

MAIN POINTS
Two periods of moderate to heavy snowfall with be: 1) this afternoon through Friday afternoon, then 2) Friday evening through Saturday night.
Greatest snow amounts (around a foot - Winter Storm Warning) are expected near and SW of a line from Phillips through Hell Creek, through Terry with lesser amounts (around 3 inches or less - Winter Weather Advisory) NE of that line.
Isolated snow amounts of 15 to 17 inches are possible for portions of Petroleum and SW Phillips Counties.
Even though wind speeds are expected to be generally less than 15 mph, dangerously cold wind chills approaching 50 below zero are possible, especially, Friday night through Saturday morning.
Heavy snow will also impact most of the rest of Montana (winter storm warnings are in effect).

IMPACTS
Many roads will become snow covered, making travel difficult - especially US-191, MT-200, and other roadways through central portions of Montana.
Some roads may become closed.
Holiday travel plans will need to be adjusted.
Frostbite can occur on exposed skin within 30 minutes.

CONFIDENCE LEVELS

Timing: High
Snow Amounts: Moderate to High
Wind Chills: Moderate to High

Wednesday, December 27th 2017
Theo and Alyce Beck Foundation Trust Awards Grants
Eight Valley County organizations received grants from the Theo and Alyce Beck Foundation Trust. Recipients are Fort Peck Fine Arts Council for Auditorium Lights for the Fort Peck Theatre, Milk River, Inc. for Recycling Project, Nashua Volunteer Fire Department for Equipment Upgrade of Fire Resistant Suits, Nashua Senior Citizens for Boiler/Furnace and Hot Water Heater Replacement, The Children’s Museum of Northeast Montana for Installation of High-Traffic Linoleum Floor, Glasgow School District for The Snack Pack Program, Town of Opheim for New Well and Valley County Conservation District for a meter to Investigate Salinity in Livestock Drinking Water.

Theo and Alyce Beck were Northeast Montana people who cared about the communities they lived in. Before she passed away Alyce graciously set up the Theo and Alyce Beck Foundation Trust to help fund projects and promote better living in Valley County through nonprofit organizations. This is the ninth year grants have been awarded.

Wednesday, December 27th 2017
Mule Deer Buck Shot in Malta, Wardens Seeking Information
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 game wardens are seeking any information regarding a mule deer buck that was shot and left in the town of Malta on Dec. 26.

On the morning of Dec. 26, Malta area game warden Ben Morin responded to a call from the Phillips County Sheriff’s Office concerning a deer that had been shot and died on the corner of 6th St. E. and 7th Ave. E. inside the city limits of Malta.

Anyone with information about the crime is encouraged to call Warden Ben Morin directly at 406-654-7630, or call FWP’s 24-hour wildlife tip line at 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668).

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

Friday, December 22nd 2017
Daines Honors Montanan of the Week: The Community of Glasgow
U.S. Senator Steve Daines today recognized the community of Glasgow for leading the way with their generosity during the holiday season.

Daines’ recognition in the Congressional Record is available here.

Through his “Montanan of the Week” initiative, Daines each week will highlight a Montanan by submitting a statement of recognition in the official Congressional Record, the document that reflects the official proceedings of Congress.

Daines welcomes anyone to nominate fellow Montanans for Daines’ “Montanan of the Week” program by calling Daines’ office at 202-224-2651 or by filling out the contact form on Daines’ website: http://www.daines.senate.gov/connect/email-steve

The following is the statement submitted to the Congressional Record:

MONTANAN OF THE WEEK

Mr. President, this week, I have the distinct honor of recognizing the community of Glasgow for leading the way with their generosity during the holiday season. Earlier this month, members of the community successfully conducted their annual Block of Bucks program to help raise funds for local families to have warm clothing during the winter months.

This charitable effort brought together a broad collection of the community, including the Glasgow Soroptimists, student council leaders from Glasgow High School, members of the National Guard, the local Elks Club, a host of local businesses and dozens of other volunteers. Through their focused actions, the community of Glasgow raised over thirty thousand dollars to provide more than three hundred children with winter clothing. If you have ever experienced winter along the Hi-Line in northeast Montana, you will know how important it is to have the proper gear. The generosity of neighbors in towns like Glasgow is something that we can all appreciate.

It is a Montana hallmark for neighbors to identify a need and then gather the people and resources to meet that need at a local level. Going into Christmas, I would like to offer a heartfelt thank you to the folks in Glasgow for giving their time and talents to help others by adding warmth to the holiday season.

Friday, December 22nd 2017
Health officials report increase in influenza activity
Local and state public health officials are seeing an increase in influenza activity across the state, with nearly 200 new cases, 40 hospitalizations, and several outbreaks reported over the past two weeks.

Reported cases are slightly higher than this time last year; however, influenza activity typically does increase in December. Department of Public Health and Human Services (DPHHS) officials are encouraging all Montanans to take some precautions when traveling this holiday season.
Influenza is a respiratory illness with symptoms that may include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills, and fatigue. Influenza affects millions across the United States each year. In Montana, the flu season usually peaks in January and lasts through May; however, flu outbreaks can be unpredictable. The influenza vaccine is the best form of prevention against the flu and provides protection throughout the entire flu season.

Influenza vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctor visits, missed work or school, but also can prevent flu-related hospitalizations and deaths. During the 2016-2017 flu season, DPHHS recorded 829 hospitalizations and 56 deaths related to influenza.

“The influenza vaccine protects against multiple strains of flu,” said Stacey Anderson of the DPHHS Communicable Disease Epidemiology section. “Even if the vaccine may not prevent every case of influenza, the evidence shows that getting a flu shot still can prevent severe illness and hospitalization. The vaccine also provides protection against other strains that circulate during the season.”

Anderson also states that getting the vaccine not only helps the individual, but can help keep others healthy as well. “Everyone is at risk for complications of the flu,” she said. “It’s not too late to get vaccinated, and the vaccine will help not only you, but protect those around you as well.”
In addition to getting the flu vaccine, public health officials recommend the following, especially during the holiday travel season:

• Avoid contact with sick people
• Stay at home when you are sick
• Cover your cough
• Wash your hands with soap and water to reduce the spread of germs
• Clean and disinfect surfaces regularly
• If you do get the flu, talk with your healthcare provider to consider antiviral treatment
More information can be found at the DPHHS website: www.flu.mt.gov

Thursday, December 21st 2017
FMDH Announces Changes to Physician Clinics
Effective January 1, 2018, the business entities of Glasgow Clinic, FMDH Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, and Hi-Line General Surgery will merge and be known as Glasgow Clinic. The new Glasgow Clinic will be made up of two divisions, the Primary Care division and the Specialty Care division. The Primary Care division will house Family Medicine and Internal Medicine. The Specialty Care division will house General Surgery, Obstetrics/Gynecology and Orthopaedic Surgery. All clinics have been, and will continue to be, owned and operated by Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital (FMDH) or its subsidiary, Hi-Line Medical Services. The clinic merger is expected to have minimal impact on patients, but will allow FMDH to better leverage payment programs from Medicare and Medicaid.

The merger will not impact the way care is delivered to patients by the Specialty Care clinics, but it will change the names of the clinics, the primary phone number for the clinics, and the manner in which clinic charges appear on the Explanation of Benefits issued to patients by their insurance company. Please note that because the names of the Specialty Care clinics will change, your statements will now have Glasgow Clinic printed on them, along with the date of service and the name of the physician or non-physician provider. By next fall, all services from FMDH will be billed on one statement. FMDH is very excited to be able to provide combined statements. This has been a frequent patient request for many years. Patient statements will contain updated information regarding these changes as they become ready to roll out.

Medicare patients will notice a change in their Medicare part B copay as FMDH anticipates the new clinic alignment will trigger the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services to increase the Medicare per-visit payment rate for the newly formed clinic. If a Medicare patient has supplemental insurance whose benefits cover the 20% Medicare Outpatient Coinsurance, they will only see the change on their Explanation of Benefits. FMDH recognizes that a patient’s financial health is an important part of their overall health and understands that an increase in a patient’s coinsurance can be a cause of significant concern. FMDH has programs in place to assist patients with meeting the financial demands of health care, including a person who is dedicated to assisting patients with navigating these demands. If you or a family member have concerns about meeting the financial demands of health care, please contact Terry Jung at 228-3633.

Beginning January 1st 2018, patients will be able to make an appointment with any Glasgow Clinic physician or non-physician provider by dialing 228-3400. The phone system will route you to the appropriate scheduler based on your needs. At this time, the physical locations for the OB/GYN, Orthopaedic and General Surgery clinics will not change, but future plans are to relocate all Specialty Care services into one location that will be accessed separately from Primary Care services, and will be much closer to what is now considered the Glasgow Clinic. FMDH is excited to share this news with our community as we continue our commitment to be the best place to receive care in rural America. (If you have questions or concern, please call 228-3400)

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