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Latest Local News
Friday, December 15th 2017
Glasgow School Enrollment Falls To 865 Students In December
The latest enrollment report from the Glasgow School District shows school enrollment at 865 students compared to 869 students in November.

Even though there are 4 fewer students in December compared to November, the 865 students is higher then the 840 students from December of 2016.

When the school year started in September, the Glasgow School enrollment was at 873 students.

The largest class in the Glasgow school system is grade 6 with a total of 77 students with the smallest class at 43 students in grade 2.

Friday, December 15th 2017
Tourists In Montana Spent More Than $3 Billion In 2017 According To New Report
MISSOULA- A new report shows that while the number of visitors to Montana didn't change much in 2017, the amount they spent still increased.

The University of Montana's Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research's preliminary estimates show that in 2017, 12.2 million nonresidents visited the Treasure State and spent more than $3 billion. Tourism spending supports an estimated 38,700 jobs directly and indirectly supports $556 million of labor income.

Gasoline spending topped the ITRR's list of tourism spending, followed by restaurant and bars, hotels, outfitters/guides and groceries and snacks.

The number of visitors is fairly even with the amount of visitors for 2016, but the report shows that visitors nonetheless stayed longer and spent more, resulting in an 8 percent increase in total spending.

Wednesday, December 13th 2017
Mule Deer Buck Shot Southwest of Glasgow, Wardens Seeking Information
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 game wardens are seeking any information regarding a small mule deer buck that was shot and left about 20 miles southwest of Glasgow, sometime on or around Dec. 8.

The deer appears to have been shot in the neck, and all the meat was left to waste. The incident occurred on BLM land about one mile southwest of Grub Reservoir, just 20 yards off the Beaver Branch road. The general deer season has been closed for two weeks.

Anyone with information about the crime is encouraged to call Warden Todd Tryan directly at 406-230-0067, or call FWP’s 24-hour wildlife tip line at 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668).

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

Monday, December 11th 2017
Final Block Of Bucks Total
The final total for the Block of Bucks is $30,310! The program, administered by the Glasgow Soroptimist Club, provides funds for children in need of essential clothing.

Last year a total of $31,671.00 was collected; donations totaled $28,703 in 2015. There were 325 children in the program this year, who each received $93 for the essential clothing.

Volunteers helped the children shop on Saturday. Thanks again to everyone who donated!

Friday, December 8th 2017
General Big Game Season Ends in Region 6, Elk Shoulder Season Starts Soon
For the second year, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 has a shoulder season that allows antlerless elk hunting from Dec. 15-Dec. 31, with a specific B-license. Elk licenses (general elk or B-licenses) valid during the archery and general seasons are not valid for the shoulder season in Region 6. Hunters must have previously applied for this opportunity during the June 1 license drawing, and received their elk B-license that is only valid during the R6 shoulder season, either a:

699-00 Elk B-license-valid in HDs 620, 621, 622, 630, 631, 632-on all public and private lands, not including CMR National Wildlife Refuge

696-00 Elk B-license-valid in HDs 680 & 690 on all public and private lands

A shoulder season is a firearms season that occurs outside the general season and is focused on antlerless elk harvest. Shoulder seasons are not intended to replace harvest during the archery or general firearms seasons, but aim to provide additional antlerless elk harvest to bring elk populations closer to objectives.

Shoulder seasons have specific objectives, and the Fish and Wildlife commission and department will monitor the success of shoulder seasons in each hunting district to ensure they are meeting the fundamental objectives.

Even though a shoulder season occurs outside the general season, all hunting regulations apply, including (but not limited to): obtaining landowner permission to hunt on private lands, properly validating your tag, wearing 400 square inches of orange above the waste, following legal shooting times, not shooting across a public road or right of way, leaving evidence of sex/species of the animal, and not shooting from a vehicle.

FWP suggests that hunters contact private landowners as early as possible, and to please be respectful during the holiday season. Shoulder-season licenses are also valid on legally accessible public lands (except CMR Wildlife Refuge), and in participating Block Management lands.

Block Management Cooperators were given the opportunity to opt out of the shoulder season, and three BMAs in the shoulder season areas are not participating in the shoulders season for elk: #1 Springer, #21 Thorstad, and #48 Burke Ranch. These BMAs are, however, still open for upland bird hunting through Jan. 1.

Biologists would like to remind license holders that this is not a “damage hunt,” with elk stacked up in concentrated areas. Hunters should prepare to hunt hard for elk, no different than any other hunting season. Expect variable weather conditions to possibly include deep snow, cold, and/or muddy conditions. Hunters should have means to retrieve elk over potentially long distances.

Region 6 will not have any shoulder season hunt information coordinators. If there are any general questions concerning the shoulder season in Region 6, the FWP website contains a wealth of information at fwp.mt.gov/hunting/seasons/elkShoulder/, or please contact the following:
• Questions about the 699-00 license can be directed to the FWP R6 office at 406-228-3700.
• Questions about the 696-00 license can be directed to the FWP Havre office at 406-265-6177.

Friday, December 8th 2017
Glasgow Among Recipients Of Main Street Program Funds
Nine Montana communities will share $100,000 in grants through the Montana Department of Commerce’s Montana Main Street Program, to support downtown revitalization and economic development projects.

“Montanans cherish our charming, vibrant downtowns and visitors seek them out,” Commerce Director Pam Haxby-Cote said,“These small grants go a long way in assisting communities with
strengthening and preserving historic downtowns with an eye toward the future.”

The following communities have received Montana Main Street Program awards:

City of Boulder: $20,000 for a Downtown Master Plan that harnesses community revitalization momentum with strategic vision and development projects.

Butte-Silver Bow County: $11,000 for a Hotel Finlen preliminary architectural report, an essential step toward successful rehabilitation.

City of Dillon: $12,500 for a Streetscape Design Plan that will develop a walkable downtown Dillon and support local economic vitality.

City of Glasgow: $15,000 for a Wayfinding Plan that better directs the flow of downtown pedestrians and tourists.

City of Great Falls: $8,000 for phase II of the Pedlet Placemaking Project that develops outdoor seating and supports the growth of local downtown business.

City of Kalispell: $10,000 for the Kalispell Trail Economic Development & Design Plan, a component of the larger rail corridor redevelopment and revitalization Core Area Plan.

City of Lewistown: $10,000 for the Creekside Marketplace Project, creating accessible greenspace and commercial development on Main Street.

City of Shelby: $3,500 for a Historic Preservation Plan, that prioritizes preservation, rehab, and local historic development incentives.

City of Stevensville: $10,000 for a Downtown Master Plan, River Park Site Plan and a Market Analysis that organize local development opportunities, local business growth, and community facilities.

Montana’s Main Street Program is recognized as a national leader in the development and revitalization of community downtowns. The program was established in 2005 and currently serves 27 communities across the state.

Friday, December 8th 2017
Mule Deer Buck Shot South of Chinook, Wardens Seeking Information
Photo: Headless mule deer buck found south of Chinook- photo by FWP

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 game wardens are seeking any information regarding a mule deer buck that was shot and left about sixteen miles south of Chinook, sometime on or around Nov. 14.

The head was removed from the deer, and all the meat was left to waste. The incident occurred on private property about 1.5 miles east of the Chinook Clear Creek Rd., near the junction with the Havre Clear Creek Road. The deer was found along what is locally referred to as the “gas well road,” which connects Clear Creek Rd. and Lloyd Rd. to the east. Only those with explicit private landowner permission can travel this trail.

Anyone with information about the crime is encouraged to call Warden Investigator Dirk Paulsen directly at 406-230-2277, or call FWP’s 24-hour wildlife tip line at 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668).

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

Friday, December 8th 2017
Two Cow Elk Shot and Wasted near Slippery Ann Elk Viewing Area, Wardens Seeking Information
Photo: One of two wasted elk found near the Slippery Ann Elk Viewing Area on CMR
Photo courtesy of FWP

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 game wardens and federal wildlife officers are seeking any information regarding two cow elk that were shot and left near the CMR’s Slippery Ann Elk Viewing Area, about 20 miles south of Zortman in southern Phillips Co., sometime on or around Nov. 23.

The two elk were found at the junction of CMR route 854 and 101, on the east side of the Slippery Ann Elk Viewing Area. A third elk was apparently shot, as there was a pile of entrails left behind. The elk were within 50 yards of each other and visible from the roadway. The two wasted elk were not salvageable due to the amount of time elapsed.

Anyone with information about the crime is encouraged to call Malta-area warden Ben Morin at 406-654-7630, federal wildlife officer Deborah Goeb at 406-464-5181 ex. 13, or call FWP’s 24-hour wildlife tip line at 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668).

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

Friday, December 8th 2017
Headless, Wasted White-tailed Deer Found in Saco Dump, Wardens Seeking Information
Photo courtesy of FWP

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 game wardens are seeking any information regarding a headless white-tailed buck that was recently left at the Saco dump about two miles south of Saco off the Larb Creek Rd.

On the afternoon of Dec. 6, Malta-area warden Ben Morin responded to a TIP-MONT call about a headless deer left at the dump. Morin located the deer and found it gutted and headless. The deer was unable to be salvaged.

Anyone with information about the crime is encouraged to call Morin at 406-654-7630, or call FWP’s 24-hour wildlife tip line at 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668).

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

Thursday, December 7th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Northeast Montana Veterans Memorial
Wednesday, December 6th 2017
Department of Commerce Announces Community Development Block Grants Awarded To Phillips County And Circle

HELENA, Mont. – Montana Department of Commerce Director Pam Haxby-Cote today announced $3.3 million in federal community development grants to assist eight local governments with projects to add or enhance important services for their communities.
Eight towns, cities and counties across the state will receive funds through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), a federally-funded program Commerce administers for Montana.
“Montana’s vibrant communities are working hard to build stronger places for their residents to live and work,” said Director Haxby-Cote. “It’s exciting to see their plans produce tangible results across Montana, and it’s a privilege for Commerce to be part of the process.”
The CDBG program assists local governments with a range of community development initiatives such as affordable housing, job creation, public works, services for at-risk members of the community and plans for future growth.
Full List of Grant Recipients:
• Beaverhead County, on behalf of the Jackson Water and Sewer District, received $294,000 for renovation of water system improvements, including construction of a new well house and transmission main connections.
• The City of Hamilton received $450,000 for construction of an Early Head Start building, play area and drop-off loop.
• The City of Helena received $450,000 for construction of a group home for supportive community living for up to eight adult residents at risk of homelessness.
• The City of Roundup received $450,000 for improvements to the water distribution system.
• Lewis and Clark County received $450,000 for renovation of an eight-unit, single-room occupancy residential group home for adults with developmental disabilities.
• Phillips County received $320,000 for the rehabilitation of the Malta Opportunities, Inc. building that provides residential, day and transportation services to people with developmental disabilities.
• Sanders County received $450,000 for centralized wastewater system replacement in the Town of Paradise.
• The Town of Circle received $450,000 for phase 1 replacements of 6,600 linear feet of asbestos cement and cast iron main.

Wednesday, December 6th 2017
Chronic Wasting Disease Found In Mule Deer Near Canadian Border
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A fatal disease has been found in a deer in north central Montana, marking the second region to have an occurrence of chronic wasting disease since it first emerged in the state this fall.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks said Tuesday that a mule deer tested positive for the disease after being shot Nov. 12, north of Chester near the Canadian border.

Chronic wasting disease already was present in surrounding states and provinces. It sickens deer, elk and moose, causing organ damage and death.

Four deer tested positive for infection this fall in south-central Montana — more than 250 miles (400 kilometers) from the latest case. State wildlife officials are planning to hold a special hunt in that area, which is around the town of Bridger, to gauge the disease's prevalence.

Tuesday, December 5th 2017
Glasgow Police Department Reminds Glasgow Citizens To Remove Campers And RV's From City Streets And Alleys.
With winter coming, the Glasgow Police Department would like to remind citizens of Glasgow that no camper, RV or watercraft may be parked on any street or alley of this city from December 1st through March 31st. The GPD thanks you in advance for your cooperation.
Tuesday, December 5th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Former Griz Football Player and NFL Agent, Andrew Schmidt
Thursday, November 30th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Chronic Wasting Disease with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks
Wednesday, November 29th 2017
Two Rivers Economic Growth Seeks New Members
Dear Valley County Community Members,

Two Rivers Economic Growth is located in Glasgow and serves as the economic engine for Valley County. We are seeking wider representation by encouraging businesses, organizations, civic leaders and individuals to join our efforts in making Valley County the best place to live, work and play!

By joining Two Rivers Board of Directors or one of our committees you will be supporting your area by communicating specific needs and goals to achieve lasting and measurable results.

Joining Two Rivers is a great way to grow your business and community. As a member, you connect and collaborate with other businesses and colleagues who are dedicated to ensuring the economic stability and growth of Northeast Montana. We are looking for energized, motivated individuals who will attend one lunch meeting the first Tuesday of each month in Glasgow to receive and share updates, report on matters in their neck of the woods and essentially be the voice of their area. There are currently four open seats on the board, several seats on our committees and volunteers are always an asset.

By joining Two Rivers Board of Directors or one of our committees you will be supporting your area by communicating specific needs and goals to achieve lasting and measurable results. If you or someone you know may be interested in representing your community and becoming involved, or for more information please, contact Two Rivers at 406-263-4769 or email trg2@nemont.

Sincerely,

TeAra Bilbruck

TeAra Bilbruck
Executive Director
Two Rivers Economic Growth, Glasgow

Wednesday, November 29th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Salvation Army Red Kettle Campaign
Wednesday, November 29th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Bob Kompel of City of Glasgow Talking New Water Treatment Plant and City Levee
Tuesday, November 21st 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Community Thanksgiving Dinner, Block of Bucks and Valley County Food Bank.
Monday, November 20th 2017
TransCanada Investigates 210,000 Gallon Oil Spill In South Dakota
AMHERST, S.D. (AP) — TransCanada Corp. says the company has sent additional crews and equipment to the site of a 210,000-gallon oil spill in South Dakota from its Keystone pipeline.

TransCanada said Saturday it is making progress in its investigation into the spill cause on farmland in Marshall County, near the North Dakota border, about 250 miles (402 kilometers) west of Minneapolis. But the company did not elaborate on the cause. The company says additional equipment and workers continue to be dispatched to the site.

Company spokesman Terry Cunha said Sunday that about 150 people are now at the site. Cunha said a gravel road has been completed to handle heavy equipment.

Crews shut down the pipeline Thursday after discovering the leak.

TransCanada says the leak is under control and there is no significant environmental impact or threat to the public.

Nebraska regulators vote Monday on a proposed Keystone XL route, an expansion that also would be operated by TransCanada.

Monday, November 20th 2017
Paving Project at the Duck Creek Fishing Access Site Completed
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Duck Creek Fishing Access Site (FAS) paving and improvement project was completed earlier this month. The FAS, which is near Fort Peck at the Duck Creek Recreation Area, is fully open to the public.

The parking area and entrance road were widened creating additional parking for boaters and more efficient traffic flow on busy weekends. Additionally, a section above the boat ramp was paved enhancing handicap-access to latrines, sidewalks and parking. The newly paved apron above the boat ramp will limit the amount of gravel that ends up on the boat ramp making for safer boat launching.

Sunday, November 19th 2017
Festival Of Trees A Success
The 13th Annual Festival of Trees was a huge success.

There was a record number of entries, 140 people were served at the prime rib dinner, and more money than ever was raised at the auction.

The Peoples' Choice winners were: Amy Aune's centerpiece entitled "Frosty" and JBR's tree entitled "Christmas Brilliance". They will each receive Chamber Big Bucks.

Friday, November 17th 2017
Valley County Sheriff's Office Arrest Glasgow Man On Felony Charge of Strangulation of Partner or Family Member
The Valley County Sheriff's Office arrested 35-year old William Kratzer on November 14th and charged him with Felony Strangulation of Partner or Family Member.

The VCSO was called to the TrailsWest Trailer Court during the noon hour on November 14th for a domestic disturbance in progress.

Kratzer was allegedly strangling his partner when the VCSO arrived on scene. The victim in the case was transported to the FMDH for injuries and was released.

Kratzer made an initial appearance in court and bond was set at $25,000. As of Friday he was still incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center.

If convicted of the felony charge, Kratzer could be sentenced up to 5 years in jail and fined up to $50,000.

Friday, November 17th 2017
Holiday Saturday Set For November 25th
You're invited to share a holiday Saturday with the Glasgow area merchants on Saturday, November 25th.

Santa will arrive at noon and is scheduled for appearances throughout the afternoon -
12:15 p.m. - Shopko
12:45 p.m. - Prairie Ridge
1:15 p.m. - Nemont Manor
1:45 p.m. - Valley View Home
2:30-4:30 p.m. - Santa visits Pehlke's Furniture & Floor Coverings

There will be a free matinee, "Nine Lives," at Valley Cinemas from 1-2:30 p.m.

Hay rides will be provided by Cornwell Ranch from 2:30-5 p.m.

The tree lighting ceremony will be held at Markle's parking lot at 5 p.m.

The Christmas Light Parade will start at 6 p.m. Most Glasgow businesses will be open until 6:30 p.m.

Thursday, November 16th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Sarah Swanson of Farm Equipment Sales
Thursday, November 16th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Errol Rice of Montana Stockgrowers Association
Wednesday, November 15th 2017
Farm Equipment Sales Announces Plan In Place To Sell to South Dakota Company
Farm Equipment Sales, a 53 year old Montana John Deere Dealership with four locations in Glasgow, Plentywood, Culbertson, and Circle, announced today that a letter of intent to sell has been made with C & B Operations, LLC headquartered in Gettysburg, South Dakota. During the announcement to their employees Marc Swanson, President and CEO of Farm Equipment Sales stated “after 53 years, we are excited to announce our alliance with C&B Operations, one of the nation’s largest and most successful John Deere dealer organizations. This partnership will ensure that all of our customers, employees, and communities have the continued support they deserve in sales, parts, and service by maintaining the existing relationships we’ve built.”

Farm Equipment Sales, Inc.’s roots date back to 1964, where in Glasgow, Montana it became a leader in agriculture for four generations. Sarah Swanson, General Manager of Farm Equipment Sales stated “with each new generation Farm Equipment Sales continues to strive to lead the Eastern Montana ag community through the changes faced by our industry, and today’s ever changing technological, capital, and agronomic changes are no different. We are passionate about the longevity of production agriculture in Northeast Montana, about ensuring that our rural communities maintain a local physical dealer presence, and about continuing to anchor our communities with highly skilled and well compensated employment opportunities. With all this in mind, we truly believe that the best long-term solution is to join the C&B Operations organization where they embody the same philosophies of integrity, teamwork, and quality that have guided FES for the past 53 years.”

C & B Operations, LLC owns and operates 25 John Deere dealerships in South Dakota, Minnesota, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana. It’s Montana dealerships are located in Billings, Miles City, and Glendive. C&B began in 1988 when Dan Cronin and Rod Burwell purchased the John Deere dealership in Gettysburg, South Dakota and has grown to be one of the premier John Deere dealers in the country. Matt Cronin, President and CEO of C & B Operations, LLC said, “Both companies are excited to begin this new chapter. Farm Equipment Sales, Inc. is known to be a leader in agriculture due to their solid infrastructure, stability of their employees, and their progressive management. By bringing our companies together, we will better serve our customers in all the market areas we support. We are thrilled to have the Farm Equipment Sales organization join our team and we want our customers in Glasgow, Plentywood, Culbertson, and Circle, to know that we are Solid, Stable, and Still John Deere!”

The transition is anticipated to take place in early 2018.

Tuesday, November 14th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Northeast Montana Relay For Life And Festival of Trees
Monday, November 13th 2017
Bentonite Mining Underway In Valley County
Photo - Bentonite clay is used for a variety of purposes including medical products and cosmetic make-up. (BLM Photo Jonathan Moor)

(GLASGOW, Mont.) – Millions of Americans need bentonite every day, but many don’t even know it.

To supply that demand, bentonite mining started in Valley County Nov. 13, 2017, on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management Glasgow Field Office.

Imerys started an open pit bentonite mine about two acres in size, approximately 20 miles southwest of Glasgow, Mont. This is a portion of a total of 17.8 acres that was approved to mine in April 2016.

“Bentonite is a locatable mineral used for a wide variety of industrial purposes, including: medical products, binder, drilling mud, and even cosmetic make-up,” said BLM Geologist Craig Towery.

Mining operations are scheduled to shut down for the year on Nov. 30, 2017.

“Since the mining is taking place during hunting season, we are asking hunters to take extra safety precautions when in the vicinity of the mining activity,” said BLM Glasgow Field Manager Pat Gunderson.

This mine is also within the Sagebrush Focal Area. “The BLM is honoring valid and existing rights on unpatented mining claims in accordance with our new Resource Management Plan,” explained Gunderson.

In keeping with the Trump Administration’s priority of getting America back to work, the BLM supports working landscapes across the West through its many programs.
Saturday, November 11th 2017
Capital Christmas Tree To Arrive In Glasgow On Friday, November 17th
The Capital Christmas Tree will be arriving here on Friday November 17th at 3:00 p.m.

It will be parking in the Valley Event Center north parking lot.

The tree will then leave for Glendive at 5:00 p.m.

Saturday, November 11th 2017
Region 6 Havre Check Station Seeing Mixed Bag on Harvest
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Havre hunter check station has been operating for five weeks so far for the 2017 hunting season. Mule deer harvest has been high compared to previous years, and most big game species and upland birds have been slightly down.

Over the five weeks the check station has been open, overall hunter numbers are down 7% from last year and are 6% below the long-term average.

“Muddy, wet weather conditions the first weekend the check station opened may have contributed to the reduction in hunters, and adverse weather conditions the last (fifth) weekend likely lead to less hunters being out in the field” said Havre-area biologist Scott Hemmer, who manages the check station.

Mule deer populations have rebounded in most areas, which has been reflected in the increased harvest, and hunters have consistently indicated they are seeing more deer.
Mule deer harvest to date is up 37% from last year and 5% above the long-term average.

“We are still seeing more mule deer brought through the station, and hunters are often commenting on the abundant mule deer they see while out hunting,” said Hemmer.

“Hunters have also reported seeing more white-tailed deer this year,” continued Hemmer, “But this has not been reflected in the harvest so far.”

For the year, 28 white-tails have been brought by the check station, which is 40% less than last year, and 55% less than the long-term average.

Antelope harvest this year is down slightly, with 81 antelope being checked since general antelope season opened. This has been a 9% decrease from 2016, but still 72% below the long-term average. Hemmer notes that part of the reason for the lower long-term antelope harvest numbers has been the reduction of permits since the 2010-11 winter.

“Hunters have reported seeing an increase in antelope numbers compared to the last few years, and that is further indication of populations increasing,” said Hemmer. “Across the region, in response to steadily climbing antelope numbers, we have made more permits available in some hunting districts this year due to increasing populations.”

Elk harvest for the first five weeks is at 27 elk, which is slightly above the long-term average.

For upland birds over the five weeks that the check station has been open, the pheasant harvest of 378 birds is below last year (-36%) and the long-term average (-49%). Sharp-tailed grouse harvest of 51 birds and Hungarian partridge harvest of 27 birds were both down from last year and below the long-term average. Eleven ducks have been brought through the check station.

“The extreme drought conditions this year appear to have affected upland bird brood survival, which can be seen in the lower percentage of juvenile birds in the harvest,” said Hemmer. “Some bird hunters have still reported seeing good bird numbers in areas with good habitat, but overall hunter success has been lower this year.”

Please remember that all hunters are required by law to stop as directed at all designated check stations on their way to and from hunting, even if they have no game to be checked. Biologists gather a lot of valuable information and biological data on game animals brought through check stations, and FWP appreciates all hunters’ cooperation in this effort.

Saturday, November 11th 2017
FWP Salmon Spawn Effort on Fort Peck Reservoir a Success
(Pictured- FWP’s BJ Kemp with a large female salmon collected during the spawn)

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks fisheries crews began collecting adult Chinook salmon the first week of October this year in hopes of collecting a large number of eggs. Throughout October, FWP staff collected an estimated 791,000 eggs from nearly 200 female salmon. Although this was down from the record year of 1.4 million in 2016, this was the second most eggs collected since the program began. Successfully hatched eggs will be raised to fingerlings and released back into the reservoir in 2018.

Crews used electrofishing boats and targeted areas near the dam throughout October. Salmon do not naturally reproduce in Fort Peck Reservoir, making these efforts critical to the continuation of this fishery.

“Despite low angler catch rates of salmon during the summer,” said Heath Headley, Fort Peck Reservoir biologist, “fisheries and hatchery staff managed to collect a respectable amount of adult salmon and eggs this fall.”

Salmon were first introduced into For Peck Reservoir in 1983. Due to the abundance of their preferred forage fish, cisco, salmon have shown excellent growth, with males maturing in two to four years and females in three to four years.

Although less salmon were caught by anglers in 2017, crews were hoping for a good egg-collection year because those fish that were caught were bigger in size.

“There were definitely fewer salmon present in 2017 when compared to last year, but the large year class(es) of cisco present likely also influenced the bite,” said Headley. “A large portion of females captured this year during the spawn collection were likely 4-year-old fish and in very good condition,” said Headley.

Reports from anglers as well as observations during netting surveys indicated most game fish species in Fort Peck, including salmon, were utilizing the abundant year class of small cisco.

“The size of most females captured was close to 20 pounds. The largest female measured was 35.8 inches and weighted in at 26.7 pounds.”

The presence of these older, larger fish allowed staff to collect a larger number of eggs from fewer fish.

“Eggs-per-female averaged around four thousand this year, compared to past years when the average was closer to three thousand to thirty-five hundred eggs per female,” said Wade Geraets, the Fort Peck Multi-Species Fish Hatchery manager. “Egg size was also larger in 2017 compared to most years, and in some instances, larger eggs may have a better hatching success and survival as well.”
“We are hoping for good hatching success and rearing over the winter, and look forward to putting more salmon back in the reservoir next spring,” said Geraets.

Thursday, November 9th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Valley County Sheriff Vernon Buerkle
Thursday, November 9th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Bruce Maxwell Talking About Montana Climate Assessment
Thursday, November 9th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Glasgow National Weather Service Office with Patrick Gilchrist and Jim Rhea
Wednesday, November 8th 2017
Fort Peck Election Results
The Town of Fort Peck had the only contested races in municipal elections for 2017. There was a contested race for 2-four year terms on the town council. The 3 candidates included Tyler Skolrud, Jim Williamson and Joe French.

Here are the results:

Joe French: 67
Jim Williamson: 60
Tyler Skolrud: 53

There was also one candidate running for an unexpired 2 year term. Kerry Aakre received 92 votes.

There are 175 registered voters in Fort Peck and 113 voted for a turnout of 65%.

Tuesday, November 7th 2017
Town of Fort Peck Election Today
The only municipal election in Valley County today is in Fort Peck where there is a contested election for 2 spots on the Fort Peck Town Council.

The mail-in ballot election concludes today with all ballots to be turned in by 8pm at the Valley County Courthouse.

62% of ballots have already been turned in according to the Valley County Election Administrator.

The contested race for the 2 spots on the Fort Peck Town Council includes Joe French, Tyler Skolrud and Jim Williamson. The top 2 will be elected to the Town Council.

There is also a uncontested race for an unexpired two year term and the only candidate is Kerry Aakre.

Tuesday, November 7th 2017
Glasgow High School Hosting Speech And Drama Meet November 18th
Glasgow High School is hosting a speech and drama meet November 18th. They are in need of Judges! There will be a short informational meeting for all judges November 16th at 6pm at the GHS Library. So if you've never had experience, that is ok! Call Assistant Coach Leila at 263-0321 to sign up!
Friday, November 3rd 2017
Winter Weather Impacts This Weekend
From the National Weather Service office in Glasgow

After intermittent periods of scattered snowfall through most of the day today, the main push of snowfall through the greater NE Montana region will occur tonight through Saturday morning.

Greatest snowfall accumulations (3-4 inches) will occur between 6:00 PM tonight and 6:00 AM tomorrow.

Persistent winds of 10 to 15 mph from the east for most of the the day today, will shift around from the northwest overnight tonight with the arrival of a cold front.

Overnight low temperatures will drop down into the single digits above zero Sunday night through Tuesday night.

A Winter Weather Advisory remains in effect from noon today to noon on Saturday.

Impacts:
Area roadways will be snow-covered and slippery.
Visibility will be reduced.
Travel will be difficult and hazardous.

Confidence
Widespread accumulating snowfall impacting visibility and travel tonight through Saturday morning: HIGH
Colder temperatures arriving to begin next week: HIGH
Widespread 3 to 4 inches of accumulating snowfall: MODERATE TO HIGH

Thursday, November 2nd 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features State Representative Casey Knudsen
Wednesday, November 1st 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Explanation Of Property Tax Bill
Tuesday, October 31st 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Halloween and Ghost Stories with Trisha Collins
Monday, October 30th 2017
Treat Street Map
Treat Street is coming up on Halloween in Glasgow - just check out the map for a list of businesses with extra special Halloween treats in store for you!

Monday, October 30th 2017
Region 6 Havre Check Station Results after Opening Weekend of General Hunting Season
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Havre hunter check station was fairly active over the weekend (Oct. 21-22) of general deer and elk opener, with an increase of hunters checked compared to last year. Oct. 21-22 was the third weekend that the check station has been open, as the station began collecting data Oct. 7-8, corresponding with the opening weekend of pheasant and general antelope.

Hunters had to hang on to their hats, as weather conditions over the opening weekend were windy on Saturday and very windy on Sunday. There were 253 hunters in 127 parties checked, which was up 6% from 2016.

However, over the three weeks the check station has been open, overall hunter numbers are down 10% from last year and are 3% below the long-term average.

“Muddy, wet weather conditions the first weekend the check station opened may have contributed to the reduction in hunters,” said Havre-are biologist Scott Hemmer, who manages the check station. “But the lower upland bird populations and corresponding bird hunter participation are also a probable cause of the lower hunter numbers.”

Mule deer harvest during the weekend increased from last year, with 65 bucks and 18 does brought through. The long-term average during opening weekend is 55 mule deer. Mule deer populations have rebounded in most areas, which was reflected in the increased harvest, and hunters have consistently indicated they are seeing more deer.
Mule deer harvest to date is up 57% from last year and 36% above the long-term average.

“The largest increase we have seen in big game harvest this year is mule deer,” said Hemmer. “This increase is likely the result of increasing mule deer populations throughout most of the Region and increases in mule deer B-license quotas.”

White-tailed deer harvest over the weekend was slightly down from last year, with six males and seven females brought in, and slightly below the long-term average of 15. For the year, 17 white-tails have been brought by the check station, which is 6% less than last year, and 10% less than the long-term average.

Antelope harvest was up from last year, with 18 bucks and three does checked in, and 72 antelope have been checked in since general antelope season opened. This has been a 9% decrease from 2016, and still 72% below long-term average. Antelope hunters have reported seeing a slight increase in antelope numbers compared to the last few years.

Elk harvest during the weekend was up slightly from last year, as seven cow elk, one bull, and two calves were brought by the check station. This was just above the long-term average of seven elk.

For the first three weeks that the check station has been open, the pheasant harvest of 318 birds is below last year (-34%) and the long-term average (-47%). Sharp-tailed grouse harvest of 34 birds and Hungarian partridge harvest of 20 birds were both down from last year and below the long-term average.

“The extreme drought conditions this year appear to have affected upland bird brood survival, which can be seen in the lower percentage of juvenile birds in the harvest,” said Hemmer. “Some bird hunters have still reported seeing good bird numbers in areas with good habitat, but overall hunter success has been lower this year.”

Please remember that all hunters are required by law to stop as directed at all designated check stations on their way to and from hunting, even if they have no game to be checked.

Thursday, October 26th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Jeff Cole and Lisa Baxter Talking Health Insurance and Services Offered By Area 1 Agency on Aging
Wednesday, October 25th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Congressional Candidate John Heenan and Missoulian Reporter Dillon Kato
Wednesday, October 25th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features The Connection and Children's Museum of Northeast Montana
Wednesday, October 25th 2017
Haunted Hayrides Return
The Haunted Hayrides will return to Glasgow on Thursday, October 26th from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Sullivan Park.

Cost is one dollar per person to ride.

The event is sponsored by GHS student groups.

Wednesday, October 25th 2017
World Wildlife Weekends Hit Glasgow
Glasgow, Montana, October 24, 2017– The World Wildlife Exhibit at the Children’s Museum of Northeast Montana is taking center stage on Saturday, October 28 and Saturday, November 4. From 7 to 9 both evenings, guests will be welcomed into the side Museum entrance (former JCPenney’s catalog pickup entrance) at 126 5th Street South to take in all that the Exhibit has to offer.

Adventure at its finest, guests will experience a diversity of animals that spans seven continents and multiple decades of the late Skip Erickson’s life. Friends of Skip will be on hand to disperse some of the colorful stories that accompany the trophies. With a $10 admission charge, attendees will also be able to sample some of our region’s finest craft beers.

Money raised during the fundraising effort will help to support the future viability of this captivating exhibit and of the Children’s Museum of Northeast Montana. Join us for two awesome evenings of fellowship!

Wednesday, October 18th 2017
Individuals Responsible for Multiple Mule Deer Shot in McCone County Have Been Identified, Wardens Thank the Public
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 game wardens declare that due to good people coming forward with good information, the individuals responsible for the multiple mule deer killed in northern McCone Co. last week have been identified and interviewed.

Region 6 wardens would like to thank the public for their phone calls, comments, and Facebook shares, and would also like to thank media outlets for helping to spread the word.

Wardens are now working with the McCone Co. attorney, and charges are pending. The case will then go in front of the McCone Co. Court.

“Our job is not to prosecute the case, our job is to present the evidence and details of fish and wildlife crimes to the proper county attorney for prosecution,” said Region 6 warden captain Ron Howell. “Ultimately, it will be up to the McCone Co. Justice Court to determine the outcome.”

Warden Todd Tryan appreciates the calls and other information that came in, and he is currently working with the TIP-MONT program to determine reward possibilities for individuals that came forward with key information.

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

Wednesday, October 18th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Valley County Commissioners
Wednesday, October 18th 2017
Youth Outdoor Skills Event Held in Glasgow was a Success
A free youth outdoor skills event was held in Glasgow on Sunday, Oct. 15, at the Glasgow Trap Club. The event was organized and funded by donations and volunteers from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Hi-Line Sportsmen, Ducks Unlimited, and the Glasgow Trap Club.
Twenty youngsters showed up on a beautiful day to enjoy some fun activities and a great lunch of burgers, hotdogs, and hot apple cider. Youth participated in activities including archery, binocular use/Montana mammal ID, BB gun shooting, shotgun shooting and the Laser Shot shooting simulation.

Organizers look forward to doing this again next year, and hope that they can get more youth involved. Please contact one of the organizers if you have any idea on how to make this a better event.

The organizers would like to thank Glasgow businesses Albertsons, Reynolds Market, and T&R Trucking for their generous donations.


Wednesday, October 18th 2017
Now Is A Good Time To Apply For Apprentice Hunter Program
Montana’s two-day, youth-only deer hunt is coming up Oct. 19 and 20, and general deer and elk season opens Oct. 21. If you want to expose a young person to hunting and mentor that person through their first hunt, now is a good time to consider signing them up for the Apprentice Hunter program. The youth hunt is a great opportunity for these novice hunters to enjoy a less crowded time in the field. With that, it’s important to note that legal apprentice hunters can hunt throughout the general season.

The Apprentice Hunter law, enacted by the Montana Legislature, allows people ages 10 and older to hunt as apprentices with a mentor for two seasons without completing a Hunter Education course. As of 2017, there is no longer an upper age limit on being an apprentice.
Fish, Wildlife & Parks highly recommends that interested people visit the website at fwp.mt.gov and read the packet on the Apprentice Hunter program before seeking certification. The packet outlines guidelines for both the apprentice and the required mentor, including what apprentices can and cannot do, who can act as a mentor, and how the certification process works. Reading up on it beforehand may prevent possible confusion and save people from making an extra trip.

Some key details to note:
Certification must take place at an FWP office, although the forms can be downloaded ahead of time from the website;
A person must be certified before purchasing appropriate licenses, which will then show apprentice status;
If the mentor is not related to an apprentice who is under the age of 18, a legal guardian’s signature also will be needed, and the parent must provide his or her driver’s license in addition to the mentor’s;
A mentor must present a valid driver’s license or other identification at the time of certification;
There is a $5 fee for certification.
An Apprentice MUST:
Be at least 10 years old at the time of license purchase;
Hunt with a mentor who is at least 21 and one that has completed hunter education if born after Jan. 1, 1985;
Have the appropriate Montana hunting licenses for the species being hunted which indicate that he/she is Apprentice Hunter certified
Stay within sight of the non-hunting mentor at all times

An Apprentice MAY:
Be a resident or nonresident;
Obtain apprentice certification for no more than two license years before he or she must complete a hunter safety and education course.

An Apprentice is NOT ELIGIBLE to:
Obtain a special bow and arrow license without first completing a bowhunter education course;
Obtain a resident hound training license for chasing mountain lion;
Participate in a hunting license or permit drawing with a limited quota;
Obtain any bighorn sheep license;
Obtain an elk license if under 15 years of age.

A Mentor MUST:
Be 21 or older;
Be related to the apprentice by blood, adoption or marriage; or be the apprentice’s legal guardian or be designated by the apprentice’s legal guardian (guardian must complete form and show ID);
Have completed hunter education if born after Jan. 1, 1985;
Have a current Montana hunting license;
Complete the Apprentice Hunter Mentor form;
Agree to accompany and supervise the apprentice hunter and remain within sight of and direct voice contact with the apprentice always while in the field;
Confirm that the apprentice possesses the physical and psychological capacity to safely and ethically engage in hunting activities.
Tuesday, October 17th 2017
JSEC Requests Donations For Scholarship
Dear Area Businesses and Interested Persons,

The Glasgow Job Service Employers’ Committee (JSEC) offers $1,000 in scholarships each year to Valley County students pursuing training immediately after high school. As an effort to improve our work-force, we are asking you to contribute to this scholarship fund.

Students can use the funds toward school related costs for any type of training. This includes short term or long term programs, technical fields, the trades or the arts. Scholarship winners are chosen based on their plans, financial need and determination.

According to the Montana Department of Labor and Industry 2015 Labor Day Report to the Governor, there a more educated workforce will be needed in the next ten years. Education beyond high school typically provides more opportunities for employment as well as increased earning potential.

We hope you will join other employers in the county by donating toward the JSEC Scholarship this year. Our goal is to raise at least $1,000 which would directly fund two or three scholarships.

Contributions can be sent to:
Glasgow JSEC, c/o Stacey Amundson, 319 3rd Street South, Glasgow Montana 59230. All donations are tax deductible and a receipt will be issued upon request. Please call me with any questions, (406) 228-2476 Ext. 1. Thank you in advance for your support!

Sincerely,


Stacey Amundson
Glasgow JSEC Chair


Job Service Employer Committee Scholarship 2018


____$25 ____$50 ____$100 $________ amount of your choice

Tuesday, October 17th 2017
Interest Free Community Cash Now Available
The Glasgow Area Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture is kicking off the 2017 holiday season with its Annual COMMUNITY Cash program.

COMMUNITY Cash Script will be available beginning Tuesday, October 16th, 2017, at First Community Bank in Glasgow/Hinsdale, Valley Bank, and Independence Bank. The purpose of the Community Cash program is to encourage people in our area to Shop Locally. Glasgow has a very good variety of quality products, services, and retail stores to choose from for your shopping needs.

The Chamber is once again trying a “kick-off”. As an incentive, the Chamber will pay the $10 processing fee for all loans written on October 16th, 2017. These are no interest loans and there is a 10 month repayment period starting in January 2018. These loans can be used for lots of merchandise and services in our area and it’s not just for your Christmas shopping. Lobbies at participating banks will be open till 5PM this day.

Individual shoppers may borrow up to $1,000.00 and married shoppers up to $2,000.00 on approved credit. The Community Cash can be used to purchase a variety of goods from toys, tires, gas, appliances, home furnishings or improvements, tools, groceries, clothing gift certificates or meals at the participating Merchants. You must be a Chamber member to accept the cash and participate in this program. You do not, however, need to be a Chamber member to borrow the Community Cash. The last day to purchase the cash is December 29th, 2017, the last day to use it is January 5th, 2018.
A list of all of the participating merchants and promotions will be available at the Chamber office, on the Chamber website, at participating banks and stores. In 2016, 69 business members participated in the program, 123 loans were issued for a total of $121,850.00 dollars Spent Locally! The Chamber encourages residents to buy locally and use the Christmas program.
“BUY LOCALLY AND THE BUCK STAYS HERE”

Tuesday, October 17th 2017
Live Under the Big Sky Features Andrew McKean of Outdoor Life Magazine
Monday, October 16th 2017
Wardens Seeking Information on Multiple Mule Deer Shot with a Shotgun in McCone County
Pictured: This buck was found on Monday, and had traveled a ways from the road before it died.

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks game wardens are seeking any information regarding multiple mule deer killed in McCone County in the evening hours of Sat., Oct. 14. At least eight deer were found, including one fawn still barely alive, that were shot with a shotgun. The deer were found scattered over two miles near road 528 in northern McCone County, on the north end of the Remuda Twitchell BMA, about 10 miles east of Hwy 24.

A local resident reported the dead deer early Sunday morning to the area Block Management Technician Dave Walter, who then contacted local warden Todd Tryan. Tryan spent most of the day Sunday gathering evidence at the crime scene. Four mule deer fawns and two does were found dead. One fawn was found still alive, and had to be dispatched by Tryan. The buck was found on Monday morning, and FWP personnel are still searching for more injured or dead deer.

"I've seen senseless killing before in my 10 years, but this incident ranks right up there among the worst,” said Tryan. "I'm also tired of having to put wounded animals like that fawn out of their misery, all because of blatant disregard for Montana's public resources."

Along road 528 near the incident, 22 spent 12-gauge shells were found, and all were of a load typically used for pheasants.

“This type of cartridge would never be used for big game, so these animals likely suffered considerably,” said Tryan. “With the number of spent shells found, there could very likely be many more deer that were injured or have since died. We are still looking.”

Anyone with information about the crime is encouraged to call warden Tryan directly at 406-263-0067, or call FWP’s 24-hour wildlife tip line at 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668).

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

“This was a completely senseless and pointless act of killing Montana’s game animals needlessly and illegally,” said Region 6 warden captain Ron Howell. “The individual(s) that did this are poachers. Hunters didn’t do this. We challenge the public to help provide more information on this case and others, so we can hold these individual(s) accountable for their actions.”

Monday, October 16th 2017
Reminder in the Field this Hunting Season: Be a Good Steward of the Land
Although most hunters respect the land, property, and wildlife they are hunting, many others do not. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks would like to remind hunters and all outdoor enthusiasts to be good stewards of the land, and respect both private and public property. The FWP Region 6 Citizens Advisory Committee, recognizing that this is an ongoing issue, raised the need for more public outreach.

Since the start of hunting season, there have been reports of vandalizing of Block Management Area (BMA) boxes, hunters driving off road, illegal trespassing, hunters being shot over, littering, and livestock being shot. Below are just a few of the things that hunters and all outdoor enthusiasts should be aware of when enjoying our resources:

Littering- not only is littering careless and unsightly, it is against the law. This includes toilet paper, and the proper management of human waste.
Leave gates as you find them- If a gate is closed, close it behind you. If it is obviously open (pulled all the way back to the fence), leave it open. If you are unsure, contact the landowner or public land agency.
Know your target and beyond- Hunters must be sure of what they are shooting at (species, sex, etc.), and know what lies beyond their target (houses, outbuildings, livestock, vehicles, other hunters).
Be aware of fire danger at all times, and use precautions.
Be weed free- Check clothes, dogs, ATV’s, and vehicles for weeds and weed seeds to help prevent the spread to other private and public lands.
Avoid driving on muddy roads- Unless it is a well-graveled road, walk.
Avoid ridge driving and driving to overlooks- Not only is this a poor strategy while hunting, it is considered as driving off road if it is not already an established trail.
Ask for permission to hunt- Montana law requires permission for all hunting on private land. Even if the land is not posted, hunters must have permission from the landowner, lessee, or their agent before hunting on private property.
Completely fill out BMA slips- If a hunter doesn’t correctly fill out a block management slip, they are hunting without permission.
Know where you are located- Whether you are hunting public land, private land, or land enrolled in an access program such as block management, it is every hunter’s responsibility to know where they are to avoid trespassing. Maps are always available, as are GPS chips and cell phone apps to aid in orientation.
Driving off road- While hunting on private property, a person may not drive off established roads or trails without landowner permission. Off-road travel on public land, including game retrieval, is prohibited unless designated as open. Consult appropriate land agency or land maps for specifics.
Accessing public lands- Access to public lands (on a private road) through private land requires permission of the private landowner, lessee, or their agent.
Camping- camping is allowed on most public lands (see agency regulations), but permission is needed to camp on private property and BMAs.
Know the rules- Consult BMA maps for specific rules on block management property, including: driving on roads, parking areas, no shooting zones, walk-in only areas, camping, number of hunters allowed, game retrieval, etc. Rules for most land agencies can be found on maps and/or on brochures. Go to the appropriate agency website or local office for information.

Report violations- report any hunting and fishing, trespassing, vandalism, or other criminal activity you see to 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668).

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.

Also remember that this time of year is a very busy time for landowners. Cattle and other livestock are being moved from their fall pastures, and are often brought near the home site for winter feeding and care. Please use common sense and respect when around these activities.

FWP also offers a free online program called The Montana Hunter-Landowner Stewardship Project. This project is an information program for anyone interested in promoting responsible hunter behavior and good hunter-landowner relations in Montana.
The program is delivered through an interactive website utilizing questions, videos, and feedback as well as opportunities for you to test your knowledge on a variety of practical topics related to hunter-landowner relations and responsible hunter behavior.

Please go to here to learn more and complete the program.

Monday, October 16th 2017
Cole Ponds Fishing Access Site Will Have Weapons Restrictions
Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks are initiating a weapons restriction at Cole Ponds Fishing Access Site (FAS) northwest of Saco, starting this 2017 hunting season.

Due to concerns of surrounding landowners near the FAS, FWP agreed that rifle hunting could be restricted. The FAS will be open for all hunting, but weapons will be restricted to archery, muzzleloader, shotgun, and traditional handgun only. This is consistent with the weapons restrictions that are found on most of the local Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs).

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