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Latest Local News
Tuesday, July 17th 2018
How To Avoid Potential Rabies Exposure
State and local public health officials remind Montanans to be aware of the risk for exposure to rabies this time of year when the likelihood of interactions with wild animals increases. Bats are migrating and animals are biting.

To avoid possible exposures, keep the following rabies prevention in mind:
• Do not feed or handle wild animals, especially bats. Teach children never to touch wild animals or handle bats, even dead ones. Ask children to tell an adult if they see or find a bat.
• Vaccinate dogs and cats against rabies. All dogs and cats should have a current rabies certificate.
• Bat-proof you house. Close all outside opening larger than 3/8” in the walls, roofs, and floors. Put screens on all windows, doors and chimneys to prevent bats from entering.
• Watch for abnormal wild animal behavior. Most wild animals are not seen during the daytime. If you see one and it is acting strangely, leave it alone and contact your local health department or animal control agency.
If you or your child has any contact with a bat, or are bitten or scratched by any wild or stray animal, please do the following:
• Wash any bite or wound with soap and water.
• Contact a health care provider or public health department for appropriate follow-up.
Rabies is a fatal disease that affects the nervous system of humans and other animals. The rabies virus is carried in the saliva of infected animals and is usually transmitted to people and other animals from the bite of a rabid animal.

The majority of rabies cases each year occur in wild animals like raccoons, skunks, bats and foxes.

Although skunks are the most common animal infected with rabies in Montana, the majority of reported human exposures result from bats.

Bats are a great concern because a bite may not be noticeable, it is important that any physical contact with a bat be brought to the attention of a health care provider or public health official.

Officials remind anyone who may have been exposed not to destroy the animal that may be responsible. It may be possible to observe or test the animal to rule our rabies and eliminate the need for treatment.

Rabies can be prevented by avoiding physical contact with stray or wild animals and seeking preventive treatment if you think you have been exposed. Report all animal bites to Valley County Health Department (228-6261) and your health care provider.

Friday, July 13th 2018
Montana Man Imprisoned For Rape, Kidnap Of Girl Loses Appeal
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A federal appeals court has upheld the conviction of a 23-year-old man in the kidnap and rape of a 4-year-old girl on Montana's Fort Peck Indian Reservation.

John Lieba Jr. was sentenced last year to 42 years in prison after authorities said he chased down the young girl at night in a park, raped and strangled her and then left her for dead in an abandoned pickup truck.

Lieba's attorneys challenged whether there was enough evidence to convict him on charges of kidnapping, aggravated rape and assault resulting in serious injury.

A three-judge panel from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said in a ruling filed Wednesday that DNA evidence and eyewitness testimony were sufficient proof of Lieba's guilt.

He's incarcerated at a U.S. penitentiary in Tucson, Arizona.

Friday, July 13th 2018
Warmer Water Leads To Higher Mortality Of Walleye That Are Caught And Released
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks wants to remind anglers that as reservoir water temperatures increase, mortality associated with catch and release also increases.
A study published in 2011 in The North American Journal of Fisheries Management found that walleye catch and release mortality rate rose from 0-1.8% with water temps below 68° F to nearly 16% when water temps were above 68° F.
Walleye that are played for extended periods of time, handled extensively in the boat, and/or stored in a live well will see an increase in mortality if the fish is later released.
Techniques to minimize catch and release mortality include:
• fight and land the fish as quickly as possible
• keep it in the water
• remove the hook as gently as possible
• have a camera or phone ready for pictures
• don’t place the fish in a live well if you plan on releasing it
Additionally, anglers are encouraged to harvest fish that are deeply hooked or bleeding, as those fish will likely not survive.
Tuesday, July 10th 2018
Northeastern Montana Family Rides Out Storm Under Pickup
This Monday, July 9, 2018 photo provided by Brooks Photography shows a radio tower blown over at the Plentywood airport by a strong storm that moved through northeastern Montana on Monday evening. A National Weather Service team was visiting northeastern Montana Tuesday, July 10, to assess the damage after back-to-back thunderstorms uprooted trees, downed power lines, damaged buildings and flipped small airplanes at the airport. (Taylor Ordahl/Brooks Photography via AP)

PLENTYWOOD, Mont. (AP) — A northeastern Montana family took shelter under a pickup truck in their shop while strong winds accompanying a severe thunderstorm destroyed their nearby trailer house, the Sheridan County sheriff said.

Chase Anderson, his wife and their two children were in their shop in Plentywood on Monday evening when the wind started shaking the building, Sheriff Heidi Williamson said.

They stayed under the pickup until the storm passed and walked out to find a bare spot where their trailer house used to be, Williamson said. The shop also was damaged, but no injuries were reported in back-to-back storms that hit Monday evening.

Anderson declined an interview Tuesday afternoon, saying he was busy cleaning up.

The National Weather Service estimated wind speeds were up to 127 mph (204 kph) on the eastern side of town, Williamson said.

A microburst with wind speeds up to 118 mph (190 kph) destroyed at least nine small airplanes, most of their hangars and bent over the radio tower at the airport, the sheriff said.

The storm also uprooted trees, downed power lines and damaged other buildings around town before moving into North Dakota.

"There's lots of downed trees, branches and garbage cans blown all over town," Williamson said Tuesday. "And it's supposed to happen again tonight."

Sheridan County officials say three transmission lines were damaged by Monday's storms. Power remained out Tuesday in Plentywood and Outlook as temperatures were forecast to reach into the high 90s or low 100s (36 to 39 degrees Celsius.)

The Civic Center in Plentywood had power and air conditioning, county officials said. The hospital was running on generators.

Tuesday, July 10th 2018
Dozens Hurt, 3 Critical, When Tornado Hits Watford City, North Dakota
This aerial image from video, shot with a drone provided by HRI Aerial Imaging, shows damage at an RV park Tuesday, July 10, 2018, in Watford City, N.D., after a violent storm whipped through the northwestern North Dakota city overnight. More than two dozen people were hurt in the storm that overturned recreational vehicles and tossed mobile homes, officials said Tuesday. (HRI Aerial Imaging via AP)

Jul 10, 2018 3:27PM (GMT 21:27)

WATFORD CITY, N.D. (AP) — More than two dozen people were hurt, at least three critically, when a tornado whipped through a North Dakota oil patch city overnight, overturning recreational vehicles and demolishing more than 100 structures, officials said Tuesday.

The storm moved through Watford City, in the northwestern part of the state, shortly after midnight, hitting an RV park the hardest, according to sheriff's officials. About 20 of the reported 28 injured were staying at the Prairie View RV Park where high winds overturned some campers and damaged mobile homes.

National Weather Service meteorologist John Paul Martin classified the tornado as an EF2, which is defined by winds speeds between 111 and 135 mph. He said wind speeds reached 127 mph in Watford City.

Clifford Bowden, 37, was in his recreational vehicle when the storm struck.

"My dog was with me and the next thing you knew the storm picked up my camper and slammed it on the ground. It felt like we were weightless," Bowden said.

"It was scary. I feel like I'm a pretty tough guy. But, this storm, it made me shake uncontrollably," he added.

McKenzie County Sheriff Gary Schwartzenberger said his onsite commander reported 122 structures in the park were completely destroyed. In addition to those structures, there were 79 with moderate damage and 120 with minor to no damage.

Karolin Jappe, the McKenzie County emergency manager, said the RV park is one of the largest such facilities to spring up during the oil boom and there were some mobile homes on the property.

"It's just like an oversized RV park on steroids," Jappe said.

At least three people suffered critical injuries, she said.

"There's more devastation than a tornado four years ago. RVs flipped over. Trucks underneath RVs," Jappe said.

Schwartzenberger says his house half a mile from the park suffered siding, shingle and hail damage.

"It's a tornado scene," Schwartzenberger said. "It went through and devastated an entire community down there. I'm devastated myself at what has happened. I feel for the families."

Schwartzenberger said the park residents were allowed back Tuesday afternoon to collect their belongings. He said the park would then be shut down and that cleanup operations would resume Wednesday morning.

"Obviously they are going to be stressed out by what they see because it was pitch black when it first happened," Schwartzenberger said. "That is why we are giving people the whole day to go in there. We want people to have the time to get their stuff."

About 150 people, including Bowden, are staying at the Watford City Civic Center where the Red Cross has set up a temporary shelter.

North Dakota Lt. Gov. Brent Sanford, a former Watford City mayor who has a home in the city, and Gov. Doug Burgum surveyed the damage Tuesday and met with local officials and displaced residents. Sanford said the extent of the damage is "devastating and mindboggling, with RVs utterly flattened and destroyed."

Tuesday, July 10th 2018
National Weather Service Preliminary Storm Survey From Plentywood
From the National Weather Service office in Glasgow

Preliminary information from our Storm Survey team showed that there was a Macroburst that hit the Plentywood Airport with speeds of 110-120 mph. 8 hangers were totally destroyed, 6 with more with moderate-major damage. 10 small general aviation aircraft damaged or destroyed.

Plentywood: some macroburst damage winds from 80-100 mph. Many large pine trees snapped or uprooted. A lot of soft tree (cottonwood type) branches broken, and trees uprooted. There are some roofs torn off, and shingles/tar paper torn off other buildings/homes, but it was sporadic.

We still need to review aerial photos and radar data, but there was a Tornado on the south end of Plentywood, damage path is not very long though. Initial estimate is an EF-1 rating. The photo of the vehicle is from the tornado damage.

No significant injuries were reported.

Tuesday, July 10th 2018
Montana Red Cross, Partners Providing Support To Plentywood Families Following Severe Storm

GREAT FALLS, MONTANA, July 10, 2018 — The Montana Red Cross is providing support to a community-operated comfort station in Plentywood after severe storms struck the Sheridan County town Monday night.

Straight-line winds of more than 100 miles per hour damaged infrastructure and knocked out power to the majority of the community. Local officials are still assessing damage to local residences, and at least one home was destroyed completely.

The National Weather Service in Glasgow has sent investigators to verify reports that a tornado touched down during the storm.

The comfort station, at the Sheridan County Civic Center, 4262 Montana Highway 16, is being provided by the county, volunteers and various service organizations. The station has food and water available to families and is equipped with backup power so they can recharge their phones. It’s also air conditioned.

Red Cross volunteers are expecting to provide casework and other support services to those impacted.

Additional severe storms are forecast for the area Tuesday evening.

To request Red Cross services, please call 800-272-6668. All services are free.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or facebook.com/redcrossmontana.

Monday, July 9th 2018
Higher Than Average Releases From Missouri River Mainstem Projects To Continue
OMAHA, NE – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Missouri River Basin Water Management Division plans to maintain higher-than-average releases from all System projects, including Gavins Point, through the summer and fall. “Due to the water currently being stored in the reservoirs and the higher-than-average runoff being forecast in the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa, the service level was increased 25,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) above full service in late June to facilitate the evacuation of stored flood waters. The increased service level means that Gavins Point releases will be increased to approximately 60,000 cfs, as downstream tributary flows recede.

Gavins Point releases will remain near 60,000 cfs for the remainder of the navigation season to ensure evacuation of all stored flood waters,” said John Remus, Chief of the Missouri River Basin Water Management Division. Gavins Point releases will be adjusted, when needed, in response to basin conditions. When necessary, the Corps will reduce releases from the System projects and utilize the available flood control space in the reservoirs, in order to lessen flooding downstream of all the projects. It is important to note that the ability to significantly reduce flood risk along the lower

Missouri River diminishes at locations further downstream due to the large uncontrolled drainage area and the travel time from Gavins Point Dam.

The 2018 runoff forecast in the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City, Iowa, is 39.8 million acre feet (MAF), 157 percent of average according to the Corps. “The updated runoff forecast reflects the melting of the above-average mountain snowpack and moderate to heavy plains snowpack, as well as above-average rainfall that fell throughout the basin over the last four months,” said Remus. The June runoff was 10.0 MAF, which is the third highest monthly runoff in 120 years of record.

As of July 2, the mountain snowpack was nearly all melted in the reach above Fort Peck and in the reach from Fort Peck to Garrison. The reach above Fort Peck has less than 0.1 inches of snow water equivalent remaining and the reach from Fort Peck to Garrison has 0.1 inches of snow water equivalent remaining. View the mountain snowpack graphic here: http://www.nwd-mr.usace.army.mil/rcc/reports/snow.pdf.

The Missouri River mainstem reservoir system (System) storage was 67.8 MAF as of July 1, occupying 11.7 MAF of the 16.3 MAF flood control zone. “Approximately 25 percent of the System’s flood storage remains available to capture runoff from the remaining mountain snowmelt and summer rainfall events. By comparison, on July 1, 2011, 16.0 of the 16.3 MAF flood control zone was occupied. The current amount of vacant flood control storage provides flexibility to lessen downstream flooding should suddenly-developing large rainfall events occur anywhere in the basin,” said Remus. System storage is expected to peak around mid-July.

Weekly updates on basin conditions, reservoir levels and other topics of interest can be viewed here: Update.

The Corps will continue to monitor basin and river conditions, including rainfall and mountain snowmelt, and will adjust the regulation of the System based on the most up-to-date information.

Reservoir Forecasts

Gavins Point Dam releases averaged 37,000 cfs during June. Releases, which are currently 38,000 cfs, will continue to increase as downstream conditions permit until they reach approximately 60,000 cfs. The Gavins Point reservoir ended June at elevation 1207.6 feet and will fall to near 1206.0 feet during July.

Fort Randall Dam releases averaged 33,500 cfs in June. Releases will be adjusted as necessary to maintain the desired reservoir elevation at Gavins Point. Releases are being made from both the powerhouse and outlet tunnels. The reservoir ended June at elevation 1361.8 feet, rising 4.0 feet during the month. The reservoir will gradually fall to near 1359.0 feet during July.

Big Bend Dam releases averaged 31,600 cfs in June. Releases are expected to average 43,500 cfs during July. The reservoir will remain near its normal elevation of 1420.0 feet during July.

Oahe Dam releases averaged 35,600 cfs during June. Releases are expected to average 43,200 cfs in July. The reservoir ended June at elevation 1614.3 feet, rising 3.2 feet during the month. The reservoir level is expected to rise 2.7 feet, peaking near the base of its 3-foot Exclusive Flood Control Zone, during July.

Garrison Dam releases averaged 48,700 cfs during June, ranging from 40,000 cfs to 60,000 cfs during the month. Releases will be remain near 60,000 cfs during July. Releases are above the maximum powerhouse release so releases are being made from both the powerhouse and the outlet tunnels. Garrison reservoir is forecast to peak in July near elevation 1853.2 feet, 3.2 feet into the 4-foot Exclusive Flood Control Zone, before falling to near elevation 1852.0 feet by the end of the July.

Fort Peck Dam releases averaged 19,400 cfs during June. Releases were increased from 18,000 cfs to 20,000 cfs in early June. Releases were decreased to 16,000 cfs in late June to help reduce inflows into Garrison reservoir. Releases were increased to 18,000 cfs in early July and will be held near that rate during the month of July. Releases are greater than the maximum powerhouse release, so releases are being made from both the powerhouse and spillway. The reservoir ended June at elevation 2247.5 feet, rising 3.1 feet during the month. The reservoir is expected to peak in July near elevation 2247.9 feet, 1.9 feet into the 4-foot Exclusive Flood Control Zone, before falling to near elevation 2247.1 feet by the end of the July.
The forecast reservoir releases and elevations discussed above are not definitive. Additional precipitation, lack of precipitation or other circumstances could cause adjustments to the reservoir release rates.

The six mainstem power plants generated 1,153 million kWh of electricity in June. Typical energy generation for June is 834 million kWh. The power plants are projected to generate 13.7 billion kWh of electricity this year, compared to the long-term average of 9.3 billion kWh.

Monday, July 9th 2018
WMA in Phillips Co. Vandalized, Wardens Seeking Information
Malta game warden Ben Morin responded to a complaint of signs being shot on Wildlife Management Area (WMA) Area 8 near Nelson Reservoir on July 6, 2018.

Upon arriving, Warden Morin found multiple WMA and parking signs had been shot, and there was a significant amount of litter, spent shell casings, and glass left in area of the damaged signs.
Anyone with information about the vandalism is encouraged to call R6 Warden Morin at 406-654-7630, or call FWP’s 24-hour wildlife tip line at 1-800-TIP-MONT (1-800-847-6668).

The 1-800-TIP-MONT program is a toll-free number where one can report violations of fish, wildlife or park regulations. Callers can remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward up to $1,000 for providing information that leads to a conviction.
Friday, July 6th 2018
Glasgow Woman Killed In Thursday Afternoon Accident
From the Great Falls Tribune

A 30-year-old Glasgow woman was killed and two children were hospitalized in a one-vehicle accident Thursday afternoon in Phillips County.

According to the Montana Highway Patrol, the vehicle was heading west on US Highway 2 near Saco went it went off the north side of the road.

The vehicle overcorrected and reentered the road and overcorrected again, rotating clockwise as it entered the ditch on the north side of the road.

The vehicle made three rotations before coming to a rest with its wheels up in a field.

A six-year-old boy, who was not wearing his seatbelt, was ejected, while a one-year-old boy who was secured was not.

The children were transported to the hospital in Billings, while the driver was pronounced dead at the scene. The name of the victim has not been released.

Friday, July 6th 2018
Heat Advisory In Effect Friday
From the National Weather Service office in Glasgow:

Today will be a hot and humid day across northeast Montana with high temperatures from the mid-90s to around 100 degrees. With lows tonight will only dropping into the mid to upper 60s and highs on Saturday in the upper 80s to mid 90s, an Excessive Heat Advisory is in effect from 11 AM until 8 PM today.

This combination of hot temperatures and high humidity will create a situation in which heat related illness is possible. Remember to drink plenty of fluids, stay in an air-conditioned room if possible, stay out of the sun, and check on pets, relatives, and neighbors.

Take extra precautions if you work or spend time outside. If possible, reschedule outdoor activities to early morning or the evening. Know the signs of heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Wear lightweight and loose fitting clothing.

Friday, July 6th 2018
Wolf Point Man Dies In One-Vehicle Crash
From Great Falls Tribune
A Wolf Point man was killed in a one-vehicle crash on a secondary road near Wolf Point late Thursday night, according to the Montana Highway Patrol.

The crash happened around 11 p.m. on Indian Highway West at BIA Route 1 just west of Wolf Point.

The 29-year-old man was driving a Chevrolet Cruze. He attempted to negotiate a right-hand curve, and the vehicle continued straight through the curve, rolled and landed upright with its nose in an irrigation ditch.

The driver was not wearing his seat belt. He was ejected and died at the scene. Alcohol is suspected as a factor in the crash.

The man’s name has not yet been released.

Thursday, July 5th 2018
Leader Of The Pack Debut Friday Night
Multiple Billboard Topping Charts will leave Audiences
Dancing in the Aisles at Fort Peck Summer Theatre’s Leader of the Pack

There is a not a song you don’t know in this high energy juke box musical. Leader of the Pack follows the record-breaking career of songwriter Ellie Greenwich, and her partner Jeff Barry. If you loved Grease and Buddy Holly, you do not want to miss your chance to dance in the aisles to such famous hits as Chapel of Love, Da Doo Ron Ron, Be My Baby and of course, the title song.

Leader of the Pack welcomes back audience favorite Chanel Bragg, last seen at FPST as Kala in Disney’s Tarzan, Apollo Singer in The Buddy Holly Story and Jewel in The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. Meggie Siegrist plays the central character of Ellie, opposite Jay Michael Roberts as Jeff. The principle cast is rounded out by Nick Dirkes, Rachel Lynn Pewitt, Sydney Hayward and Leigh Treat.

Local cast members include Colton Pewitt, Austin Babb, Mariah Cathey, Daniel Dunn, Isabelle Griffin, Aubre Hartsock, Dawn Jenkins, Becky Johnson, Lauren Kolstad, Anthony Manfredo, Abigail Peterson, Blayd Sanders, Tarin Vandall, as well as FPST company members Michaela Cathey, Tommy Parker, John Knispel, Jacob Nalley, Chris Morucci, Mathias Oliver and Jacob Herrera.

James Rio, previously seen in FPST’s Man of LaMancha and Cabaret, switches to the other side of the footlights as director for the production. Megan Wiltshire is choreographer, with musical direction by Alicia Bullock-Muth and Luree Green-Chappell (who also leads the live onstage band, comprised of Trevor Toavs, Colin Jamba, Hayley Nybakken, Max Knodel, Jon Svingen, Jenna Johnson and Kelly McCann).

Performances are July 6 – July 22; Friday & Saturday at 7:30pm and Sunday at 4:00pm.
For more information call 406-526-9943 or visit our online box office at fortpecktheatre.org

Following Leader of the Pack, the 2018 season continues with:
• Disney’s The Little Mermaid: July 27 – August 12
• Almost Maine: August 17 – September 2

Monday, July 2nd 2018
Theo and Alyce Beck Foundation Trust Scholarships Available
Applications are now available for the Theo and Alyce Beck Foundation Trust Scholarship. These scholarships are for Valley County graduates who are past their first year of education with a GPA of at least 2.5 on a scale of 4.0 and considered full-time status in a college, university or vocational-technical institution.

Applications can be picked up from Edward Jones, 317 Klein Avenue, and from Ruth Ann Hutcheson, 12 1st Avenue North. Applications must be mailed and postmarked no later than August 1, 2018. Incomplete applications will not be considered for the scholarship.

Theo and Alyce Beck were northeast Montana people who cared about the communities they lived in, whether it was Baylor where their lives began, Opheim where they farmed, or Glasgow where Alyce spent her retired years after Theo passed away.

Alyce was active in 4-H and Homemakers Club, as well as entering plants, sewing projects and homemade baked goods in the Northeast Montana Fair, all most every year. Shortly before Alyce passed away, she generously decided to set up the Theo & Alyce Beck Foundation Trust for the benefit of people in Valley County.

Monday, July 2nd 2018
Live “Bat Walk” Scheduled For July 7 At The Fort Peck Interpretive Center
What do bats do at night? Aerobatics! This weekend, the Fort Peck Interpretive Center in Fort Peck (a cooperative effort between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) is having a special weekend activity theme of “Night Life in Fort Peck,” including learning about moon phases and all about owls and their pellets.

In addition, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks will be helping to host a live “Bat Walk.” The Bat Walk will take place beginning at the Downstream Campground Amphitheater, starting at 8:15 p.m. on Saturday, July 7.

To kick things off, FWP Region 6 biologist Heather Harris will deliver a presentation on bats and their importance in our ecosystem. This will be immediately followed by a Bat Walk around the Downstream Nature Trail in search of bats as they begin their nighttime hunting. FWP will provide a variety of “bat detecting” devices so you will be able to “hear” the bats hunting and navigating!

Everyone is welcome, but we encourage youngsters under the age of 12 be accompanied by an adult. We will see you there!

Friday, June 29th 2018
Glasgow Police Chief Bruce Barstad Retiring
Glasgow Police Chief Bruce Barstad today announced he will be retiring from the Glasgow Police Department after 30 years of service to the GPD. Barstad was appointed Chief of Police in 2009.

Glasgow Mayor Becky Erickson thanked Barstad for his service and wished him well as he pursues new endeavors.

Mayor Erickson has appointed Brien Gault as the interim Chief of Police and is leading the GPD effective immediately.

Gault has been an officer in the GPD for 20 years and has 27 years of law enforcement experience

Barstad will remain as an employee with the GPD until July 29th when his retirement will become official. He will assist Gault through the transition period during that time period.

Wednesday, June 27th 2018
Valley County to receive $1,149,572 in federal PILT funding
U.S. Senator Jon Tester today announced that Montana counties will receive $40 million in Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) for 2018.

Tester secured these PILT funds in March during debate on the bipartisan federal budget. Tester was the only member of Montana’s congressional delegation who voted for PILT.

“Montana counties rely on these funds to provide public services and balance their budget,” Tester said. “This investment will help rebuild schools, plow roads, hire law enforcement officers, and perform other duties critical to rural America. As we debate next year’s budget, I will relentlessly fight tooth and nail to ensure local leaders, families, and businesses have the financial certainty they need to continue investing in their communities.”

Tester announced that 56 Montana counties will receive PILT payments this year. PILT payments are awarded to counties with federal lands that are not taxable by local governments. Those lands, however, require local government services, such as law enforcement and infrastructure.

Valley County will receive $1,149,572 in PILT funding for 2018. This compares to $1,137,518 in PILT funding in 2017.

Tester secured an additional $500 million for Montana counties through PILT in the 2019 Interior Appropriations Act. The Senate is expected to take a final vote on that legislation before the end of September.

Tester this spring led the charge to reauthorize another essential funding initiative for Montana counties, Secure Rural Schools (SRS). As a result of Tester’s efforts, Montana counties with forested lands received more than $17 million from SRS to compensate for the decline in timber production.

Tuesday, June 26th 2018
Leighton Hughes facing drug charges according to Glasgow Police Department
Glasgow Police Chief Bruce Barstad told Kltz/Mix-93 that Glasgow resident Leighton Hughes is facing 6 felony drug charges after his arrest on June 22nd.

Hughes was arrested at his residence at 1002 5th Avenue South in Glasgow by the Glasgow Police Department. Chief Barstad told Kltz/Mix-93 that Hughes was originally arrested for a misdemeanor outstanding warrant when during the arrest, officers with the GPD found suspected methamphetamine on his person. Officers also found that methamphetamine was being used in the home and obtained a search warrant for the home.

Officers with the Glasgow Police Department and Montana Department of Justice DCI searched the home on June 23rd.

As a result of the search, Hughes has been charged with 6 felony drug charges and 2 misdemeanor drug charges.

The charges include:
Criminal possession of dangerous drugs-suspected meth
Criminal possession of precursors to dangerous drugs
Criminal production of dangerous drugs- suspected marijuana
Criminal production of dangerous drugs- suspected meth
Endangering the welfare of a child
Operation of a unlawful clandestine laboratory

The misdemeanor charges include criminal possession of dangerous drugs-marijuana and criminal possession of drug paraphernalia.

Officers with the Drug Enforcement Agency have arrived in Glasgow and have put together a clean up crew to clean the residence and they have also taken possession of the suspected methamphetamine.

Hughes in incarcerated in the Valley County Detention Center awaiting his initial appearance.

Tuesday, June 26th 2018
Montana Senators pass bill authorizing Fort Peck-Dry Prairie Rural Water Project
U.S. Senators Jon Tester and Steve Daines pushed a bill through the Senate to deliver clean water to over 27,000 people on the Fort Peck Reservation and surrounding communities.

The legislation would extend the authorization of the Fort Peck-Dry Prairie rural water project from 2020 to 2026.

“This bill will provide access to clean water for families, businesses, and schools across Fort Peck,” said Tester. “I will keep holding Washington accountable to Fort Peck to increase access to clean water, improve local schools, increase the quality of health care, and build the infrastructure that allows local businesses to thrive.”

“Clean and safe water is a basic need for all communities,” said Daines. “This bill will put the shovel in the ground for a project that will deliver high quality water to members of the Fort Peck Tribes and surrounding area.”

This critical water infrastructure project will construct more than 3,200 miles of pipeline to carry municipal, rural, and industrial water to the Fort Peck Reservation and surrounding communities.

80 percent of the private systems on the Fort Peck Reservation currently have nitrate levels above safe drinking water standards.

Tester and Daines are both members of the Senate Indian Affairs and Appropriations Committees.
Monday, June 25th 2018
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Reminder Of Sandbar Closures
OMAHA, Neb. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers reminds residents that many sandbars with active piping plover and interior least tern nests are closed for recreational use during the nesting season which runs from mid-May through August. The closures are necessary in order to protect nests and chicks and increase populations of these threatened and endangered birds.

With current water levels higher than normal, nesting habitat is limited along sections of the Missouri River. The endangered interior least tern and threatened piping plover lay their eggs and rear chicks on sandbars and reservoir shoreline on the Missouri River between Ft. Peck Dam in Montana and Ponca State Park in Nebraska.

Higher-than-average releases from all Missouri River System projects will continue over the next several months leaving less available habitat for the birds. The Corps will be placing signs on sandbars to restrict access and to protect the birds from pedestrians and off-road vehicles during the nesting season. Closed sandbars are marked with signs warning the public to keep out of the area.

Sandbars that do not have signs posted may also have active nests, but nesting activity is limited and the sandbars are open for public use. Anyone using unposted sandbars should be alert for nests and eggs as well as signs that may be difficult to see due to vandalism. The Corps urges people who spot a nest or a closure sign to move to a different sandbar. People using unposted sandbars should make sure to leave no trace of their presence and remove all garbage so that predators such as gulls and crows are not lured to the sandbars. People should also keep any pets from wandering onto closed sandbars.

Tern and plover nests are small, shallow depressions in the sand, and the buff-colored eggs are camouflaged to make it difficult for predators to see them. It is very easy to overlook a nest and injure the eggs or chicks, so it is vital to avoid closed sandbars until nesting season ends. It is important to protect these birds so the benefits of operating the Missouri River mainstem reservoir system can continue.

“Taking” threatened and endangered species may result in civil or criminal penalties. Under the Endangered Species Act, “take” means to harass, harm, hunt, shoot, wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect a threatened or endangered species. Activities such as driving all-terrain vehicles on sandbars can harass birds and cause them to abandon their nests and lead to the deaths of the unhatched chicks.

The Corps works with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and state agencies to protect these birds in accordance with the ESA. Each year, these agencies coordinate to determine the appropriate level of restrictions based on the birds’ and the public’s use of sandbars. Please report violations to Nebraska Game and Parks at (800) 742-7627 or South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks at (888) 683-7224. In North Dakota, please call USFWS at (701) 400-8433.

Sunday, June 24th 2018
GHS Educational Trust Application Deadline Nears
Glasgow High School Graduates who are attending college or trade school are reminded that the application deadline for financial aid from the Glasgow High School Educational Trust is July 1, 2018. All students who have completed one year of college or one semester of trade school, are in good academic standing, are attending full-time, and are showing progress toward the completion of a degree may apply. Students enrolled in on-line or correspondence programs full-time may also be eligible. The application is available on the trust’s website at www.ghsedutrust.org . The site also lists certain other requirements that must be met as well, such as the inclusion of a student’s signed financial aid acceptance letter. Applications must be complete and submitted on time to be considered.

The Glasgow High School Educational Trust was established by the GHS Class of 1938. Since its inception in 1964, it has awarded $2,019,000.00 in financial aid to 710 different GHS graduates. Students who receive grants may reapply for up to a total of eight semesters. With the costs of higher education escalating each year, and student debt at all-time highs, all eligible students should apply for this generous opportunity made possible through the contributions of hundreds of faithful trust supporters.
Monday, June 18th 2018
Valley County Undersheriff Luke Strommen placed on paid administrative leave
Valley County Sheriff Vernon Buerkle has told Kltz/Mix-93 News that Valley County Undersheriff Luke Strommen has been placed on Paid Administrative Leave. This action is the result of an ongoing investigation being conducted by investigators from the Montana Department of Justice. Sheriff Buerkle told Kltz/Mix-93 the investigation is the result of an incident that occurred approximately four years ago.

This is the only information being released from the VCSO regarding this action.

Strommen is a candidate for Valley County Sheriff and is set to face off against Joe Horn in November.

Friday, June 15th 2018
36th Year of Valley County Combined Campaign A Sucess
The Valley County Combined Campaign has announced that the 2018 campaign was a success with $20,914 donated by Valley County residents for worthwhile causes.

The amounts raised:

American Red Cross- $2358.31
Boy Scouts of America- $2395.32
Girls Scouts of the USA- $1923.32
Glasgow Head Start- $2438.97
Scottie Day Care- $2235.87
Valley County Ministerial Association- $3249.97
Children's Museum of NE Montana- $2647.29
Valley Event Center- $3664.95

the $20,914 raised was an increase of $1500 from last year.

Friday, June 15th 2018
Valley County Unemployment Rate At 2.3%.
MONTANA – Governor Steve Bullock today announced Montana’s unemployment rate dropped slightly to 3.9% for the month of May. The U.S. unemployment rate was at 3.8% in May.

“Montana’s economy strong and growing – more Montanans are on the job than ever before in our state’s history and we lead the country in middle-class growth,” said Governor Bullock. “And we continue to invest in the workers of today and our workforce of tomorrow – all the way from pre-school to post-secondary education like college, apprenticeships and work based-learning.”

Payroll employment posted a gain of 1,000 jobs, while total employment levels posted insignificant changes over the last month. The largest gains were in the professional and technical services industry.

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased by 0.2% in May, primarily due to increases in the gasoline and shelter indexes. Over the last 12 months, inflation has been accelerating, with an increase of 2.8% in the CPI-U. The index for all items less food and energy, also called core inflation, increased 0.2% in May, with a change of 2.2% over the last year.

The unemployment rate for Valley County in May was 2.3%. This compares to 2.8% in May of 2017.

Thursday, June 14th 2018
Two Rivers Awards Grants Throughout Valley County
Glasgow, MT. June 11, 2018 – Two Rivers Economic Growth awards Storefront Beautification Grants to
four Valley County businesses.

Two Rivers recently launched the 2018 Valley County Storefront Beautification Project. This was a 1:1
match with awards up to $1,000 per applicant. Projects are awarded based upon criteria within the
grant that follows guidelines for façade improvement that enhances curb-side appeal. This
promotes growth and development for individual businesses as well as the entire area.

Two Rivers is proud to announce grant awards to existing and new businesses that include:

• Chicken Ranch & Whistle Stop Barbershop owned by Mary Helland. She is currently focused
revitalizing the historic appeal of downtown by exposing the original brick siding and
upgrading windows to that will invite customers to enter her shop and experience tin ceilings,
a marble entry & copper chandelier!

• The Repair Shop owned by Regina Cain. Regina has set her sights on signage and lighting so
that her business is easily located day or night. Restoration of the original brick will bring back
that historic feel to downtown Glasgow that we all miss!

• Hinsdale FFA (Future Farmers of America). Hinsdale’s charm does not go unnoticed and the
addition of new Montana-made concrete & metal trash receptacles on Main Street will help
to add to this community’s appeal for locals as well as those who travel the hi-line!

• Vick’s Lanes owned by Dan Crotty. A Nashua hot-spot, Vicks Lanes plans to replace windows
and paint their storefront. This will definitely add some appeal and encourage people to stop
in and see what else they are up to!

Two Rivers thanks all applicants and encourages others to look forward to future projects as we
continue our efforts year after year through this program.

Thank you for helping Two Rivers to make Valley County the best place to live, work & play!

For more information or to inquire about membership or volunteer projects, please contact Executive
Director, Keegan Morehouse at 406-263-GROW(4769), email trg2@nemont.net or visit our website at
GrowValleyCounty.com.

Contact: Two Rivers Economic Growth
Phone: 406-263-GROW (4769)
Email: trg2@nemont.net
Website: GrowValleyCounty.com

Wednesday, June 13th 2018
Hand recount in Valley County Commission race has no changes from results released election night
Mary Armstrong and Gilbert Mogan will face off against each other in November in the race for the Valley County Commission.

Mary Armstrong finished with 774 votes while Gilbert Mogan had 433 and Todd Young with 430. The hand recount done by the Valley County Commissioners determined that the vote total was the same as the voting machines total from last Tuesday.

The voting machine count of just 3 votes separating Mogan and Young precipitated a hand recount which was done by the Valley County Commissioners Wednesday morning.

The 2 individuals with the top votes move on to the General Election in November.

Wednesday, June 13th 2018
Great Falls Tribune reports young child killed after being hit by truck in Roosevelt County Tuesday afternoon.
Story from Great Falls Tribune:

A young child on a bicycle was killed after being hit by a truck in Roosevelt County Tuesday afternoon.

According to the Montana Highway Patrol, a Ford F-250 driven by a 65-year-old Wolf Point man was traveling north on Boulevard near an intersection with C Street in Poplar around 2:30 p.m. when a 3-year-old male on a bike entered the street from a driveway.

The driver did not see the child due to a parked car blocking the view of the driveway and struck him with the truck.

The child, who was from also Wolf Point, was pronounced dead at the scene. It is unknown if he was wearing a helmet.

The driver did not sustain any injuries and speed is not considered a factor in the crash, per MHP.

The name of the victim has not been released.

Monday, June 11th 2018
Even in FWP Region 6, Please Be Bear Aware
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks would like outdoor enthusiasts to be “Bear Aware,” even in northeast Montana. Although bear encounters are rare in most of FWP Region 6, black bears are occasionally seen in the Little Rockies and the Bears Paw Mountains. Recently, one black bear was found near camping areas on the south end of Beaver Creek County Park in the Bears Paw mountains south of Havre.

Many times, bears are attracted to campground areas and homes due to the garbage produced and the availability of food. However, if bears are going to become a local wildlife species that we can all enjoy, we need to be smart about living with or near them. This includes preventing situations that habituate bears, such as rummaging through garbage and exposure to other unnatural food attractants.

It is unlawful to intentionally, or to inadvertently, feed bears. When bears access garbage and other food sources, they can become food-conditioned and potentially be dangerous. Once a bear is food-trained, it is often impossible to un-train them. That is why biologists so often say: “A fed bear is a dead bear.”

Wildlife officials often must euthanize food-conditioned bears in the interest of public safety, a situation that everyone wants to avoid. A much better option is to prevent bears from becoming habituated in the first place.

FWP reminds folks that live or camp in areas where bears might be to always:
Secure garbage inside a garage, secure shed, or vehicle
Bring pet food in at night
Clean up livestock food
Bring in bird feeders, and clean up spilled seed

In addition, hunters and other recreationists are reminded to properly store game meat, food, livestock feed, garbage, and all other attractants in a bear-resistant manner. This also discourages other wildlife, such as raccoons and skunks, from causing problems with your belongings as well.

There are many resources available to hunters and recreationists on ways to prevent bears interactions, some of which can be found at: fwp.mt.gov/fishAndWildlife/livingWithWildlife/beBearAware/ .
Monday, June 11th 2018
Free Event Invites Public To Learn About And Monitor Chimney Swifts
Come join us for “A Swift Night” – chimney swifts, that is – on Saturday, June 16 at the FWP Region 6 headquarters in Glasgow.

During this event, hosted by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and Montana Audubon, participants will learn about chimney swifts and how they can help to monitor local populations.

Chimney swifts are fascinating birds that can be found in your backyard or, more accurately, a nearby chimney! However, little is known about their distribution in the state. We are looking for eager volunteers that want to learn about chimney swifts and help locate them.

There will be a presentation from 7-8 p.m. in the Quonset meeting room at the R6 FWP headquarters building, followed by an evening challenge to locate and identify local swifts by sight and sound. The event will be led by Amy Seaman of Montana Audubon and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 biologist Heather Harris.

Please RSVP to Amy Seaman at aseaman@mtaudubon.org . All ages are welcome, but youth under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Ice cream and water will be provided.

Sunday, June 10th 2018
Mayor Jimison Declares June 10-16 Miss Montana Week In Glendive
GLENDIVE- Ten Miss Montana contestants and eight Miss Montana's Outstanding Teen Contestants from across the state will arrive in Glendive Sunday, June 10 for the 69th Miss Montana Scholarship Pageant, and the 14th held in Glendive. At the Garden Party Sunday at 5PM Mayor Jerry Jimison will proclaim this week as Miss Montana Scholarship Program Week in honor of 2017 Miss Montana Maddie Murray of Corvallis and Miss Montana's Outstanding Teen Allie Baisch of Glendive. The Garden Party at the Glendive Nursery is an opportunity for the sponsors to meet the contestants and enjoy salads and cream puff filled sandwiches before contestants start rehearsals.

The public can choose a finalist by voting for Montana’s Choice online at www.missmontana.com with $1 per vote. The contestant with the most votes earns a scholarship and a spot as one of the finalists on the last night of competition.

This will be the last year for the swimsuit competition as the Miss America Organization is changing the format.
The 2018 Miss Montana contestants are Toby-Jean Almy of Miles City; Jessica Criss, Bozeman; Kristy Cullinan, Glendive; Justiss Firemoon, Poplar; Laura Haller, Helena; Abigail Helland, Glasgow; Madison Kuehn of Bozeman; Rayna Laakso, Park City; Savannah Leidholt, Miles City and Julie Theis of Sidney.

Competing to be Miss Montana’s Outstanding Teen now held by Allie Baisch of Glendive are Taitlyn Berry of Glendive, Cammie Heck, Sidney; Rachel Jakovac of Helena, Tymber Jensen, Absarokee; Sloan Orrell, Belgrade; Eden Paressini, Billings; Kinsey Ross, Bainville and Samantha Young of Glendive.

Contestants compete June 14,15 and 16 at 7PM at the DCHS Auditorium for scholarships with each Miss Montana contestant receiving at least $850 and a chance to represent Montana at the Miss America Pageant in Atlantic City in September. Montana’s chosen teen, crowned Friday, June 15, advances to the Miss America’s Outstanding Teen pageant in Orlando.

Package tickets are $50 for all three nights with the crowning of Montana's Outstanding Teen on Friday night and Miss Montana on Saturday evening. Patron tickets with reserved seating are $60. Individual night tickets, the Friday night Gala and Saturday’s Royal Tea tickets are available at the Glendive Chamber, Farm to Table Store 377-4285, www.missmontana.com and at the door as contestants vie for $300,000 in cash and scholarships.

Thursday, June 7th 2018
Recount in Valley County Commissioner Race set for Wednesday, June 13th
Valley County Election Administrator Lynne Nyquist has announced that the recount in the Valley County Commissioner election will be held Wednesday, June 13th.

The recount will be conducted by the Valley County Commissioners starting at 8am. The recount is necessary due to the fact that just 3 votes separated Gilbert Mogan and Todd Young in the commissioner race.

Mary Armstrong finished in first place but the 3 votes separating Mogan and Young precipitated the recount. Either Mogan or Young will advance to the November General Election to face Armstrong.

Wednesday, June 6th 2018
Recount almost a certainty in Valley County Commissioner Race
Valley County Election Administrator Lynne Nyquist has told Kltz/Mix-93 that a recount is almost a certainty in the race for Valley County Commissioner. Mary Armstrong received the most votes in the 7-person race with 774 votes. But in the race for 2nd place, it was very close as Gilbert Mogan received 433 votes and Todd Young 430 votes.

Todd Young has told Kltz/Mix-93 that he will ask for a recount and will submit the necessary paperwork. Under Montana law, because the margin of votes between Mogan and Young was so small, if Young asks for a recount then Valley County will pay the cost.

The top 2 candidates will advance to the November General Election. Mary Armstrong finished in a strong 1st place but it remains to be seen who will be the second candidate to advance to November.

Lynne Nyquist said it is unknown at this time when the recount will take place. She said it will be a hand recount done by the Valley County Canvass Board. The Canvass Board is comprised of the 3 County Commissioners but its possible they would authorize other people to conduct the hand count.

Tuesday, June 5th 2018
Unofficial Results have Armstrong and Mogan winning County Commissioner race
Unofficial results have Mary Armstrong and Gilbert Mogan winning the race for Valley County Commissioner. Both candidates are expected to advance to the November General Election.

Mary Armstrong: 774
Gilbert Mogan- 433
Todd Young- 430
Rene Clampitt- 343
Jim Uphaus- 277
Arlie Gordon- 163
Mike Carney- 161

Just 3 votes separated Mogan and Todd Young. Young has told Kltz/Mix-93 he will ask for a recount.

Full Valley County results are available here:

http://mtelectionresults.gov

Monday, June 4th 2018
Catfish Classic Results
A NEW record was set this year as it's the most catfish over 10 lbs. ever weighed in at a single Montana Cats event.

FINAL RESULTS 19th Annual Milk River Catfish Classic
1. Jason Flaten, West Wendover, NV., Cole Plouffe, Glendive, MT. 33.30
2. Willy Lauckner, Nashua, MT., Chris Kolstad, Glasgow, MT. 32.03
3. Karl Krause, Glasgow, MT., Jake Kuka, Glasgow, MT. 28.29
4. Scott Redstone, Glasgow, MT., Aidan Redstone, Glasgow, MT. 27.43
5. Bryon Armour, Lewistown, MT., Ty Thomas, Lewistown, MT. 26.41
6. Brady Flaten, Glasgow, MT., Jason Molstad, Glasgow, MT. 25.90
7. Casey Riggin, Glasgow, MT., Jessica Pennington, Glasgow, MT. 25.22
8. Jeff Irving, Bozeman, MT., Dylan Hughes, Glasgow, MT. 23.95
9. Bobby Wise, Billings, MT., Robert Wise, Billings, MT. 22.95
10. Jerry Molstad, Miles City, MT., Nate Molstad, Havre, MT. 22.42
11. Joel Smith, Glasgow, MT., Marc Kloker, Glasgow, MT. 21.50
12. Dave George, Glasgow, MT., Candy Lagerquist, Glasgow, MT. 20.17
13. Mitch Mcintyre, Glasgow, MT., Jim McIntyre, Glasgow, MT. 20.03
14. Tyler George, Sheridan, WY., Ryan George, Joliet, MT. 19.82
15. Callahan Belling, Richland, MT., JD Bailey, Opheim, MT. 19.45
16. Shawn Hopstad, Glasgow, MT., Zach Miller, Glasgow, MT. 19.40
17. David Nixdorf, Glasgow, MT., Carter Pederson, Glasgow, MT. 18.83
18. Ed Sugg, Hinsdale, MT., Storm Jackson, Glasgow, MT. 18.37
19. Cody Stensland, Fairview, MT., George Stuckers, Sidney, MT. 18.25
20. Timm Canen, Miles City, MT., Aimee Kloeckner, Glasgow, MT. 17.95
21. Bo Boreson, Perrysville, IN., Vance Anderson, Glasgow, MT. 17.62
22. Chad Dawson, Dickinson, ND., Brady Burgess, Glasgow, MT. 16.95
23. Kevin Howie, Billings, MT., Travis Kennedy, Billings, MT. 15.91
24. Tara Harrington, Glasgow, MT., Allan Harrington, Glasgow, MT. 15.87
25. Steve Harris Sr., Sidney, MT., Quinten Nelson, Sidney, MT. 15.84
26. Blake Gauer, Park City, MT., Lindsey Gauer, Park City, MT. 15.36
27. Steve Lowrey, Fairview, MT., James Decker, Sidney, MT. 15.30
28. Norm Braaten, Fort Peck, MT., Dustin Braaten, Fort Peck, MT. 15.27
29. James Bergeron, Sidney, MT., Marty Ross, Sidney, MT. 15.20
30. Seth Combs, Beulah, ND., Mark Combs, Glasgow, MT. 14.53
31. Darci Shipman, Glasgow, MT., Curtis Shipman, Glasgow, MT. 14.07
32. Jesse Nickels, Nashua, MT., Jessica Nickels, Nashua, MT. 13.53
33. Robert Peterson, Billings, MT., Jaysen Riggin, Billings, MT. 13.29
34. Jacob Aune, Glasgow, MT., Shawn Wersal, Glasgow, MT. 13.05
35. Josh Moore, Sidney, MT., Hailee Moore, Sidney, MT. 12.71
36. Mike Zoanni, Glasgow, MT., Nate Doornek, Glasgow, MT. 12.02
37. Nate Meiers, Billings, MT., Duane Meiers, Billings, MT. 11.92
38. Steve Norcutt, Glasgow, MT., Brien Norcutt, Glasgow, MT. 11.67
39. Courtney Gagne, Dickinson, ND., McKenna Gagne, Glasgow, MT. 11.63
40. Jeremiah Johnson, Laurel, MT., Scott Swanson, Billings, MT. 11.63
41. Blaine Berg, Glendive, MT., Damen Scherting, Glendive, MT. 11.34
42. Troy Vandall, Glasgow, MT., Tristin Vandall, Glasgow, MT. 11.18
43. Spencer Marsh, Glasgow, MT., Caleb Lagree, Glasgow, MT. 11.15
44. John Grimes, Nashua, MT., Coel Stutheit, Glasgow, MT. 11.13
45. Brodie Boreson, Hinsdale, MT., Lindsey Boreson, Hinsdale, MT. 11.10
46. Steve Harris Jr., Sidney, MT., Nick Fortier, Billings, MT. 10.94
47. Colton Hill, Dickinson, ND., Wyatt Pedersen, Glasgow, MT. 10.56
48. Brien Gault, Glasgow, MT., Autumn Gault, Glasgow, MT. 10.41
49. Cody King, Minot, ND., Casey King, Glasgow, MT. 10.17
50. Josh Marottek, Medicine Lake, MT., Drew Henry, Glasgow, MT. 10.02
51. Brenden Waarvik, Billings, MT., DJ Elletson, Glasgow, MT. 8.88
52. Cody Kuka, Glasgow, MT., Katie Anderson, Glasgow, MT. 8.63
53. Kyle Gibson, Glasgow, MT., Trevin Gibson, Glasgow, MT. 8.12
54. Tori Gagne, Glasgow, MT., Shannon Ost, Glasgow, MT. 7.35
55. Larry Hockhalter, Glasgow, MT., Dale Borgan, Glasgow, MT. 6.86
56. Robert Kemp, Glasgow, MT., Jodi Schock, Glasgow, MT. 6.61
57. Spencer Gay, Glendive, MT., Pat Gay, Billings, MT. 4.89
58. Mike Meredith, Nashua, MT., Stone Tahista, Nashua, MT. 4.77
59. Craig Compton, Mount Ulla, NC., Quinton Compton, Glasgow, MT. 4.75
60. Crystal Boreson, Perrysville, IN., Katie Clausen, Lambert, MT. 4.52
61. Kobe Sibley, Glasgow, MT., Trevor Klind, Glasgow, MT. 4.47
62. Jeff Unterseher, Glendive, MT., Ben Unterseher, Glasgow, MT. 3.99
63. Paul Pasley, Bigfork, MT., Michael Williams, Havre, MT. 3.20
64. James Schultz, Cambridge, NE., Hunter Schultz, Fort Peck, MT. 2.83
65. Paul Provencher, Glasgow, MT., Wayne Linder, Glasgow, MT. 2.20
66. Rob Seder, Hardin, MT., Rod Seder, Billings, MT. 1.24
67. Derek Mahlum, Great Falls, MT., Aaron Wittmer, Havre, MT. 0.99
68. Doug Mahlum, Great Falls, MT., Kane Mahlum, Great Falls, MT. 0.63
69. Bob Harrington, Glasgow, MT., Kat Geer, Glasgow, MT. 0.00
Melissa Sigmundstad , Glasgow, MT., Briana Lee Page, Glasgow, MT. 0.00
Paul Moore, Hinsdale, MT., Jennifer Moore, Hinsdale, MT. 0.00
Tyler Johnson, Nashua, MT., Zach Watts, Nashua, MT. 0.00
Kelcey Arnold, Hinsdale, MT., Jake Knaff, Hinsdale, MT. 0.00
Justin King, Sidney, MT., Tony Maurer, Sidney, MT. 0.00
James Prevost, Fort Peck, MT., Bryce Kauffman, Glasgow, MT. 0.00
David Irving, Glasgow, MT., Rod Ost, Glasgow, MT. 0.00
Matt Bushman, Billings, MT., Corey Bushman, Billings, MT. 0.00
Dan Achten, Laurel, MT., Amber Achten, Laurel, MT. 0.00
Derek Carda, Sidney, MT., Adam Smith, Sidney, MT. 0.00
80. Luke Morehouse, Glasgow, MT., Nathan Hopstad, Glasgow, MT. 0.00
Jumbo Whiskers Award - Jake Kuka 12.26 lbs.
Big Whiskers Award - Bobby Wise 11.60 lbs.

Monday, June 4th 2018
Election Day Set for Tuesday
41% of registered voters in Valley County have already cast their ballots for the Primary Election by voting absentee according to numbers provided by the Montana Secretary of State.

1960 ballots had been cast at the end of the day Friday which is 65% of the total number of absentee ballots that have been given out to registered voters in Valley County.

For those wishing to vote at the polls on Election Day, polling places in the Glasgow Civic Center will open at 7am and will close at 8pm.

Friday, June 1st 2018
Middle Of Nowhere Segment To Air On NBC Saturday, June 2 At 5:30 p.m.
The NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt will air the segment on Glasgow being the "Middle Of Nowhere" on Saturday, June 2nd during the 5:30 p.m. news.

NBC film crews did several interviews while visiting Glasgow a couple weeks ago.

The original story came from a Wall Street Journal that named the city as the Middle Of Nowhere due to its distance from any metropolitan area.

Friday, June 1st 2018
Wolf Point Convenience Store Clerk Abducted
(From KTVQ
WOLF POINT - A gas station employee in Wolf Point was abducted after trying to stop a shoplifter, according to the Wolf Point Police Department.

Police were dispatched to the Town Pump in Wolf Point just before 1:30 a.m. on Wednesday, May 20.

The suspect stole two 30-packs of beer and when the employee went after him, the employee was assaulted.

Surveillance video showed that after the physical altercation, the suspect abducted the employee.

While driving around with the employee in a van, the suspect allegedly threatened violence and death, punching the employee in the face and choking him, according to the Wolf Point Herald.

The driver ultimately released the clerk.

The nature and extent of the clerk's injuries has not been released.

Police are working on obtaining a warrant for the suspect, whose name has not yet been released.

Friday, June 1st 2018
Man Dies After Being Hit By Train In Wolf Point
(Information from: The Billings Gazette )

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A man was killed after being hit by a BSNF Railway work train in Wolf Point.

BNSF spokesman Ross Lane tells The Billings Gazette that an initial investigation indicates the man may have been crawling around under the train while it was parked and was killed when it began moving Wednesday night.

BNSF maintenance workers called 911.

Roosevelt County Undersheriff John Summers says the victim was a man who appeared to be in his 30s. His name has not been released.

Friday, June 1st 2018
School's Out Carnival Postponed Until Saturday, June 9th
Due to the rainy and windy weather, the School's Out Carnival has been postponed.

Their 3rd Annual “Schools Out Carnival” will be Saturday, June 9th from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

There’ll be a water slide, carnival-style games, cake walk, & prizes all outside of the Children’s Museum on 2nd Avenue South.

Area kids are invited to come celebrate the beginning of summer with the Northeast Montana Children’s Museum.

There’ll be a water slide, carnival-style games, cake walk, & prizes all outside of the Children’s Museum on 2nd Avenue South, in downtown Glasgow.

Extra Info:
Waterslide wrist bands are $10
Parents, make sure your children have a swimsuit, towel, and possibly some dry clothes to change into

Children will purchase tickets to play carnival-style games. With their winnings, they’ll be able to buy items from the prize table inside the Museum

An annual membership is just $60 and covers up to 6 family members. Along with having unlimited access to the Museum during regular hours, you’ll also receive discounts on special events.

Friday, June 1st 2018
GHS Educational Trust Deadline Is July 1
Attention: Glasgow High School graduates attending college or trade school.

You may be eligible for financial aid from the Glasgow High School Educational Trust.

Log on to www.ghsedutrust.org NOW for the application and other relevant information, so that you can complete your application by the July 1, 2018, deadline.

REMINDER:
If you completed the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid), your GHS Educational Trust application must include a signed and dated copy of your acceptance letter indicating what aid you have accepted.

Tuesday, May 29th 2018
Public Service Commission to act on MDU request to raise natural gas rates for Montana customers
HELENA, Mont. – May 25, 2018 – The Montana Public Service Commission scheduled a work session for Tuesday, May 29, to act on Montana Dakota Utilities request to raise their rates for natural gas.

“The Commission put out a request last December for utilities to show us how they plan to pass the savings from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 on to consumers,” said Commission Chairman Brad Johnson. “Since then, this requested increase has been cut almost in half.”

MDU’s original rate case requested increased revenue of $2.8 million dollars, resulting in an increase in the monthly bill of 4.1% for an average user. The revised request now asks for only $1.497 million. They first submitted the application to raise rates on September 25, 2017. The Commission held the first public hearing on the case on April 26, 2018, and will now vote up or down on approving the new rates.

The Montana Consumer Counsel, which advocates on behalf of ratepayers, intervened in the case. The MCC and MDU reached a stipulation modifying the rate increase downward. The work session on May 29 will vote on that stipulation.

Johnson said, “Regardless of how the Commission votes, the record in this case shows that the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 is pushing downward on the rates consumers pay for natural gas.”

The meeting will be held at 9:00 AM Tuesday, May 29, in the Commission’s office in Helena, MT

Tuesday, May 29th 2018
Wolf Numbers Remained Strong In 2017; Reminder That Wolves Are Managed In Eastern Montana Too

According to the 2017 Montana Gray Wolf Program Annual Report, population estimates suggest there are approximately 900 wolves in Montana. This marks the 13th consecutive year that Montana has far exceeded wolf recovery goals.

Montana’s wolf population has remained relatively stable with an annual wolf harvest that averages about 225 animals per year. During the 2017-2018 wolf season, 255 wolves were harvested: 65 percent hunting, 35 percent trapping. Approximately, $380,000 was generated for wolf conservation and management by wolf license sales.

Livestock depredation by wolves during 2017 was approximately 25 percent of what it was in 2009, when it was at a peak. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services confirmed 80 livestock losses to wolves in 2017, which included 49 cattle, 12 sheep, and 19 goats during 2017. One dog was also killed by wolves. This total was up compared to 53 livestock losses during 2016. During 2017 the Montana Livestock Loss Board paid $64,133 for livestock Wildlife Services confirmed as probable or certain wolf kills.

Wolf management in eastern Montana

With the recent release of this 2017 wolf report, it’s a good reminder that FWP manages wolves across Montana under a statewide management plan, including eastern Montana. FWP is committed to using its authority to responsibly manage Montana’s wolf population while addressing conflicts with livestock and other wildlife populations. Although wolf populations and management activities are largely focused on western Montana, all the same wolf management tools are in place across eastern Montana.

Wolves may be hunted throughout the state, with a season from Sept. 2-Sept. 14 (archery) and Sept. 15-March 15 (rifle). Hunting wolves requires a wolf license, which can be purchased over the counter for $19 (resident) or $50 (nonresident). Proof of hunter education must be presented at the time of purchase.

Wolves may also be trapped ($20 resident, $1 resident landowner, $250 nonresident) from Dec. 15-Feb. 28. Completion of either the Idaho or Montana wolf trapping certification class is mandatory.

Persons could take a combination of up to five wolves via hunting and/or trapping. FWP publishes wolf hunting and trapping regulations annually, and these are available at all license vendors and FWP offices. Note: National Wildlife Refuges may have different regulations on wolf management, and like any other species, permission is needed to hunt for wolves on private land.

Another aspect of wolf management includes increased emphasis on proactive prevention of livestock depredation. Montana law and administrative rules (MCA 87-3-130; ARM 12.9.1301-1305) allow a person to kill a wolf that is seen in the act of attacking, killing, or threatening to kill livestock or domestic dogs.

no permit is required and FWP must be notified within 72 hours of take or attempt to take
preserve the scene and leave the carcass where it was killed; carcass is surrendered to FWP
physical evidence of the wolf attack or that an attack was imminent is required (injured or
dead livestock, broken fences, trampled vegetation and wolf sign) that would lead a reasonable person to conclude the attack was imminent
wolves cannot be intentionally baited, fed, or deliberately attracted
Wolves may be opportunistically hazed or harassed

This same law also allows private citizens to kill a wolf that is seen in the act of attacking, killing or threatening a domestic dog or another human. Again, FWP must be notified within 72 hours of take or attempt to take.

Wolf sightings do periodically happen in eastern Montana, but currently no wolf packs are known to exist in the eastern side of the state. Recently, a FWP game warden reported seeing a lone wolf in south Phillips Co., and neighboring landowners were notified. FWP would encourage anyone who believes they see a wolf in Region 6 to contact your local biologist, game warden, or call the Glasgow Region 6 FWP Headquarters at 406-228-3700.

To learn more about Montana’s wolf population, visit FWP online at fwp.mt.gov, or go directly to this link.

Tuesday, May 29th 2018
Fort Peck Summer Theatre Alum Returns For 44th Season Opener: Guys On Ice
If you love fishing, beer or the Green Bay Packers, you are sure to laugh out loud at this hilarious musical about ice fishermen. Fort Peck Summer Theatre opens the 49th season with Guys on Ice.

FPST is honored to welcome back Neal Lewing to star in the musical. Lewing was a company member during the theatre’s inaugural season, 49 years ago in 1970. He and his wife Karen now run The Port Polson Players!

Lewing’s daughter Anna Loehrke is making her FPST debut as director of Guys on Ice (as well as starring in the Theatre for Young Audience tour of The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe)

Completing the cast are returning company member Christopher Morucci and Billy Pipinich. Pipinich is a familiar face to many in this area, but might seem out of place: he spent multiple summers as the chef at Fort Peck Hotel.

Performances are June 1 – June 10; Friday & Saturday at 7:30pm and Sunday at 4:00pm.
For more information call 406-526-9943 or visit our online box office at fortpecktheatre.org


Following Guys on Ice, the 2018 season continues with:
• Cabaret: June 15 – July 1
• Leader of the Pack: July 6 – July 22
• Disney’s The Little Mermaid: July 27 – August 12
• Almost Maine: August 17 – September 2

Tuesday, May 29th 2018
Scottie Booster Club Awards Jeff Jurgens Scholarships
Six Valley County high-school graduates have received Jeff Jurgens Memorial Scholarships to enable their studies at colleges and universities in Montana and neighboring states.

The scholarships are awarded annually by the Scottie Booster Club in memory of the late Jeff Jurgens, Glasgow student and rabid sports fan whose namesake basketball tournament is the source of the funds. The Jeff Jurgens Memorial Tournament, presented by the Scottie Booster Club, is held annually in March and attracts over 100 youth basketball teams from across northeastern Montana and southern Canada.

In order to be eligible for the Jeff Jurgens scholarship, students must have graduated from a Valley County school and either played varsity basketball or are entering a medical or health-related field of study at a college or university in Montana or a neighboring state. This year, the Booster Club selected six scholarship recipients from a field of well over a dozen applicants.

Applicants’ sports backgrounds are considered, along with academic achievement, community service, citizenship, and financial need.

The six 2018 JJMT Scholars are:

Bryce Legare – A 2018 graduate of Glasgow High School, Legare played four years of basketball and was selected to the all-conference team his senior year. He is playing in his fifth year of Reds baseball, served on the student council and G Club at GHS, and runs Legare Lawns, a landscaping service. He will attend Montana State University where he plans to major in finance.

Alex Fransen – Another 2018 GHS graduate, Fransen will attend Dickinson State University this fall, where he will play football and intends to major in criminal justice. Fransen played two years of Scottie basketball, starting varsity his senior year, as well as lettering in football and track and participating in American Legion baseball. He has volunteered for a wide range of community events and organizations. Fransen has worked seasonally for Mike Brown Construction.

Deann Rasmusan – Rasmusan graduated from Glasgow High School this year and is attending Minot State University, where she intends to study communication disorders. She played three years of high school basketball, has been a member of the Glasgow Kiwanis Swim Team for 9 years, and has volunteered for Key Club, Hi-Line Skating, and National Honor Society. She has worked at Valley View Nursing Home, Hi-Line Eye Care, and as a lifeguard for the City of Glasgow.

Haylee Fauth – A 2018 Opheim High School graduate, Fauth will attend Miles Community College to pursue a degree in teaching. She played basketball and volleyball for three of her four years of high school, missing years only because of a shortage of players to field a team. She has been involved in FFA, student council, choir, Academic Olympics, and worked as an assistant coach and referee as well as helping on a number of area ranches.

Casity Boucher – Boucher, a 2018 Hinsdale High School graduate, will attend Miles Community College this fall. She is a 4-year basketball player, a co-captain her junior and senior seasons, and was named to the all-conference team. She also played volleyball and participated in track. Boucher is involved in student council, FFA, National Honor Society, H-Club, band, and has extensive involvement in community activities as well as helping on her family’s ranch.

Taylor Laumeyer – A 2018 graduate of Nashua High School, Laumeyer will attend Minot State University, where she will participate in track and pursue a degree in music education. She played basketball throughout her high school career, and also participated in volleyball and track. She has been involved in band, student council, 4-H, and a wide variety of community services and organizations. She works seasonally for Brabeck Construction.

Thursday, May 24th 2018
FWP Region 6 Mule Deer & Whitetail Deer Aerial Survey Findings Released
Pictured: Winter survey mule deer-Photo by FWP’s Drew Henry

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 biologists have completed their 2018 winter and spring aerial surveys of deer populations across northeastern Montana, which are used to help determine management recommendations. The surveys indicate above average numbers for mule deer, and mostly stable populations of whitetail deer across the region.
“Data collected during deer surveys are only one factor in deer management recommendations,” FWP Outlook-area biologist Ryan Williamson (and Region 6 deer specialist) explained. “The prior year’s harvest, weather, and habitat factors, as well as additional input gathered from landowners, hunters, the public and other agencies are all considered by the Fish and Wildlife Commission for season and quota setting decisions.”

Mule deer
For mule deer, 11 trend areas in Region 6 are typically examined each year from the air. The winter “post-season survey” was completed in January, and the “spring survey” was conducted in late April and May. While total deer counts tend to be variable, the 2018 surveys indicate mule deer are doing quite well. “Mule deer trends remain stable and well above average across most of the region,” Williamson said.
The 2018 post-hunting-season surveys showed the region-wide mule deer population at 74 percent above average, but 15 percent below the 2017 survey.

The 2018 spring surveys showed region-wide populations at 46 percent above average and remain the same as the last year’s spring survey. While regional numbers indicate above average mule deer levels overall, differences are seen across the region and in isolated areas as well. According to Williamson, mule deer from the 11 deer trend areas range from slightly below average to well above the average.
This same trend was seen in the deer fawn-to-adult ratios that are also calculated from the spring survey. Region wide, the fawn numbers continue to do quite well and remain above average.

“Fawn to adult ratio is an indicator of over-winter survival as well as new recruitment into the population,” Williamson said. “The 2018 survey showed 57 fawns to 100 adults across the region, which is slightly above the average of 53 fawns to 100 adults. These numbers were also similar to the 2017 survey.”

Winter mortality was variable across the region during the 2017-2018 winter with the highest impacts seen in localized areas around Malta and Havre. “Winter mortality was observed in western areas,” Williamson noted, “with mostly fawns succumbing to the winter weather.”

Although a long, tough winter was observed throughout the region, the eastern portion did not experience near the snow accumulation as seen throughout the western portion of the region in areas where near record snow depths and extreme cold temperatures were observed.

“The region experienced a wide range of abnormal weather in the last year. Much of the region experienced a significant drought in 2017, particularly the eastern portion, which had significant impact on habitat conditions,” says Williamson. “Fawns likely went into the harsh, long winter in poorer condition than normal which likely impacted overall winter survival.”

The mule deer appeared to have overwintered well. FWP Malta-area biologist Brett Dorak in Malta adds, “We understand there will be a variation in survival across the region, but overall things are looking great coming out of a bad winter.”

Another pressing factor in managing deer populations is the threat of chronic wasting disease (CWD) that was discovered last year in wild herds in Montana, both in Region 5 and Region 4. CWD has not yet been found in Region 6, but has been detected just across the Montana border in Alberta and Saskatchewan.

“It is just a matter of when and where CWD will be detected in Region 6,” says Williamson. “Higher deer densities tend to influence the spread of the disease, so we take that into consideration when developing hunting season regulations and the number of antlerless deer B-licenses available.”

For 2018, most of the hunting districts will be managed under the liberal regulations for mule deer, which includes either-sex for a general deer license (A-tag), as well as additional antlerless B-licenses. “The liberal regulation package is expected in hunting districts, specifically along the Canadian border. As normal, hunting district 652 continues to be a limited permit district and will have a limited number of B-licenses available,” Williamson said. “All hunting districts will have a varying number of mule deer B-licenses available this year, with the license application deadline on June 1.”

Whitetail deer

Whitetail deer populations continue to recover across the region as well. Due to more uniform habitat, the whitetail surveys tend to look at deer density, as opposed to total numbers, for trends. The 2018 year’s survey show whitetail deer density is at an average of 9.6 deer per square mile across the trend areas, which is approximately 10 percent below the long-term average of 10.7 deer per square mile. The 2017 surveys showed whitetails at right at long term average.

“Whitetail deer densities continue to recover in the eastern part of the region, but are still four percent below average, while the densities are still 33 percent below average along the Milk River near Glasgow,” Williamson said.

“A decade ago, whitetail densities were as high as 40-50 deer per square mile in some areas. This was an unsustainable level that was causing problems for landowners and degrading habitat conditions,” Williamson said. “EHD outbreaks and other factors in the following years reduced the whitetail population across Region 6 considerably.”

Although no significant EHD outbreaks have been seen since 2014, areas with higher deer densities along the Missouri River experienced small outbreaks of EHD in recent years.

With whitetail numbers increasing across Region 6, and in accordance with Fish and Wildlife Commission season setting, a single-region antlerless whitetail B-licenses will again be available for over the counter purchase starting August 6, 2018. The licenses will be limited to one per hunter. Additionally for 2018, there will be a limited number of region-wide antlerless whitetail B-licenses available for this fall with applications due at the June 1 deadline.

Thursday, May 24th 2018
FWP Region 6 2018 Elk Surveys Completed
Pictured: winter elk survey- picture by Region 6 FWP’s Brett Dorak

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks biologists have completed the 2018 surveys of the Missouri River Breaks (MRB) and Bears Paw elk herds in Region 6. The aerial surveys were completed in February and March by Region 6 biologists Brett Dorak, Scott Hemmer and Drew Henry. Overall, survey results found elk numbers in the Missouri River Breaks were down from the last survey, while elk numbers in the Bears Paw herd were up from last year. Elk calf numbers in both herds were near average during the surveys, indicating typical winter mortality.

“Both management units are doing well,” said Havre-area biologist Scott Hemmer. “Fortunately, elk appear to have weathered the severe weather conditions we had this last summer and winter.”

Missouri River Breaks (MRB) Elk

The MRB elk survey across Hunting Districts (HD) 621, 622, 631, and 632, was completed in February and is done biennially. Neighboring Breaks districts are typically flown concurrently to limit the potential for elk to be missed or double counted due to movements between districts.

A total of 2,294 elk were observed across the four districts, with 1,662 in HDs 621/622, and 632 in HDs 631/632. The total number of elk observed was 33% fewer than the 2016 survey and 20% below the long-term average, with above average calf-cow and bull-cow ratios.

The management objective for the MRB districts is 1700-2000 elk. Due to elk numbers being chronically over objective, FWP implemented changes during the 2016 season for additional elk hunting opportunities, including 300 antlerless elk permits and 500 antlerless elk B “shoulder season” licenses (apply by June 1). These opportunities have continued, and starting this season, the shoulder season dates have been extended from Dec. 15-Jan. 15. The additional antlerless elk hunting opportunities were designed with the help of the Breaks Elk Working Group to provide private landowners with more elk management options.
Bears Paw Elk

The Bears Paw elk survey, completed in March, is flown annually and includes HDs 680 and 690. There were a total of 647 elk observed, which is up 24% from last year and is currently 67% above the long-term average. Calf-cow ratios were average and bull-cow ratios were below the long-term average.

The management objective for the Bears Paw is 250 elk. With elk numbers over objective in the Bears Paw districts, FWP implemented similar opportunities as in the Breaks districts in 2016, including 100 antlerless elk permits and 100 antlerless elk B “shoulder season” licenses (apply by June 1). Again, these opportunities have continued and, starting this season, the shoulder season elk B licenses will be valid from Dec. 15-Jan. 15.

With elk numbers above the population objectives across the Region 6 elk management units, hunters should look into additional elk hunting opportunities available through the drawing. It is also a good reminder to secure permission on private lands early to make the most of the 2018 hunting season.

Thursday, May 24th 2018
Check Out the Improvements Made at the Duck Creek Fishing Access Site
Memorial Day weekend is generally the “kick-off” for the boating season. If you are making your way to the Duck Creek area on Fort Peck Reservoir, you will see some major improvements to the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks’ Fishing Access Site (FAS) and boat ramp.

Last fall, The Duck Creek FAS underwent a paving and improvement project. The improvements were in response to concerns of large amounts of gravel washing down on to the ramp, making traction difficult. FWP staff often swept the gravel off the ramp to improve the conditions, but it would only be a short time before gravel washed back onto the ramp.

To help remedy this problem, FWP contracted with a construction company to pave the apron above the boat ramp. “The extension of the concrete apron should reduce the amount of gravel that ends up on the boat ramp,” says Dave Fuller, Region 6 FAS Coordinator. “ Less gravel on the boat ramp will make for safer and easier boat launching.”

In addition, the parking area and entrance road were widened, creating additional parking for boaters and more efficient traffic flow on busy weekends. Furthermore, a section above the boat ramp was paved enhancing handicap-access to latrines, sidewalks and parking.

The Duck Creek FAS is a partnership with the Army Corp. of Engineers (COE), who lease the property to FWP. The surrounding COE Duck Creek Recreation Area provides camping, a fish cleaning station, parking areas and other latrines.

“We are really happy to make these improvements to the Duck Creek FAS,” says Fuller, Region 6 fishing access site manager. “This is a very popular site, and has seen a large increase in use the last few years. Not only will these changes make boat launching safer and more efficient, but all recreationists will enjoy the easier access to parking and the latrines.”

Boat launching tips, and Clean. Drain. Dry.:

For boat launching to become even more safe and efficient at boat launching sites, here are some tips to practice proper boat ramp etiquette and safety:

Before attempting to launch (in the staging area)-
Remove boat tarp, if on
Transfer any fishing rods, coolers, towels, etc. from your vehicle to your boat
Remove engine and transom tie-down straps, and disconnect the trailer wiring
Remember to put in your drain plug!

During launching (and at the water’s edge)-
Use at least two experienced people- one to drive the towing vehicle and one to operate the boat- if possible
On “double-wide” ramps, launch on one side or the other…not in the middle
Unhook winch line at the water’s edge, use a rope on the boat if not motoring off
Move the boat to the courtesy dock to pick up passengers
Quickly move the towing vehicle off the ramp
Never block a ramp with an unattended boat or vehicle!

Coming off the water (and before leaving the staging area)-
Drop off the tow vehicle driver on the courtesy dock, and move the boat away from the dock if other boats are coming in to drop off tow vehicle drivers.
The tow vehicle’s place in line determines the order boats will be retrieved, not where a boat is tied to a dock.
Transfer any fishing rods, coolers, towels, etc. from your boat to your vehicle at the staging area, not on the ramp
Make sure your vehicle is Clean. Drain. Dry.:
Remove all mud, plants and animals from the boat and trailer
Remove the drain plug
Drain and dry all live wells, holds, bilge, and any areas where water collects
Dry any wet equipment

Wednesday, May 23rd 2018
Valley County Sheriff Vern Buerkle addresses allegations of misconduct
Valley County Sheriff Vernon Buerkle has told Kltz/Mix-93 that the Montana Department of Justice recently investigated allegations of misconduct against a officer with the Valley County Sheriff's Office.

Sheriff Buerkle said the VCSO had received information that a VCSO Deputy had been engaged in official misconduct with a female during a traffic stop.

The decision to bring in the DOJ to investigate the allegation was supported by the officer who was the subject of the investigation.

The DOJ came to Valley County and contacted the female in question. The female disavowed having any contact with the officer, and denied any part of this rumor entirely. Sheriff Buerkle stated the alleged misconduct was unfounded.

Buerkle said the VCSO is dedicated to ensuring all of its employees act in accordance with the law and execute the duties of their office with full regard to the law. Allegations of official misconduct will always be treated seriously and will be referred to an outside agency for review and investigation. Further, if allegations arise regarding official misconduct, the VCSO would request that those allegations be reported to the Sheriff's Office, so they may be dealt with officially to ensure that no impropriety has occurred.

Tuesday, May 22nd 2018
62% of Registered Voters in Valley County choose to vote absentee
62% of registered voters in Valley County have chosen to vote absentee in the upcoming June 5th Primary Election.

2961 of the 4754 registered voters in Valley County are receiving their ballots by mail rather then voting in person on June 5th for the Primary Election.

Already, 896 voters have returned their ballots to the Valley County Election Office.

Tuesday, May 22nd 2018
Montana Department of Transportation To Identify Options To Stabilize Roadway South of Malta
LEWISTOWN - The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) would like to notify the public and seek comments on a study to identify options to stabilize a section of roadway damaged from landslides on U.S. Highway 191 (US-191).

The study area is located 60 miles northeast of Lewistown in Fergus County along the approaches of both sides of US-191 within the western end of the Charles M. Russell Wildlife Refuge between reference post (RP) 84.3 and RP 85.2.

This two-lane section of roadway is part of the National Highway System used as a major freight route, which has experienced frequent and significant pavement degradation, slope failures, loss of highway shoulders, and mudslides that impact traffic safety and mobility.

The purpose of the project is to identify potential options to improve stability and performance of the highway.

Proposed work includes ground surveying, aerial photography, exploration drilling, as well as a variety of geotechnical and engineering evaluations. Work activities may cause short delays on occasion for highway traffic.

The initial work is estimated to be completed in summer 2019, which may be followed by supplemental work as needed to adequately determine landslide characteristics.

The landslide of greatest concern is the Mobridge Slide located near RP 84.3, which impacts approximately 2,000 feet of highway (see photograph). As the highway embankment shifts downhill, the pavement will distress and crack, creating an irregular and hazardous driving surface that requires periodic maintenance.

A summary report for this first stage of studies is expected to be completed by December 2018.

For more information, please contact Billings District Administrator Stefan Streeter at (406) 657-0268 or Project Design Engineer Miki Lloyd at (406) 444 9200.

Members of the public may submit written comments to the Montana Department of Transportation Billings office at P.O. Box 20437, Billings, MT 59104-0437, or online at:

mdt.mt.gov/mdt/comment_form.shtml

Tuesday, May 22nd 2018
GPD Safe Kids Reward Program Is Back For The Summer
The Glasgow Police Department would like to remind everyone that as the school year draws to a close and the days stay long and warm, the kids in our community will be outside playing and exploring and creating their summer adventures.

Last year the department began an ice cream cone incentive program for kids that the officers encountered that were making good and safe choices in their summer activities. Whether safely buckled in their car seats or wearing a helmet and biking carefully, or other outdoor activities, the officers wanted a way to reward those kids that were making the effort to play safe and foster that behavior in all of our area youth.

We have again partnered with McDonald’s, Flips and Dairy Queen of Glasgow to make coupons for free ice cream cones available for officers to reward kids for making good decisions. The department would like to thank the community for supporting this program. The Glasgow Police Department sees this as an opportunity for our officers to interact supportively with kids in our community, and for everyone to recognize the need to stay safe outside this summer.

Tuesday, May 22nd 2018
Montana FWP completes Elk Survey
Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks biologists have completed the 2018 surveys of the Missouri River Breaks (MRB) and Bears Paw elk herds in Region 6. The aerial surveys were completed in February and March by Region 6 biologists Brett Dorak, Scott Hemmer and Drew Henry. Overall, survey results found elk numbers in the Missouri River Breaks were down from the last survey, while elk numbers in the Bears Paw herd were up from last year. Elk calf numbers in both herds were near average during the surveys, indicating typical winter mortality.

“Both management units are doing well,” said Havre-area biologist Scott Hemmer. “Fortunately, elk appear to have weathered the severe weather conditions we had this last summer and winter.”

Missouri River Breaks (MRB) Elk

The MRB elk survey across Hunting Districts (HD) 621, 622, 631, and 632, was completed in February and is done biennially. Neighboring Breaks districts are typically flown concurrently to limit the potential for elk to be missed or double counted due to movements between districts.

A total of 2,294 elk were observed across the four districts, with 1,662 in HDs 621/622, and 632 in HDs 631/632. The total number of elk observed was 33% fewer than the 2016 survey and 20% below the long-term average, with above average calf-cow and bull-cow ratios.

The management objective for the MRB districts is 1700-2000 elk. Due to elk numbers being chronically over objective, FWP implemented changes during the 2016 season for additional elk hunting opportunities, including 300 antlerless elk permits and 500 antlerless elk B “shoulder season” licenses (apply by June 1). These opportunities have continued, and starting this season, the shoulder season dates have been extended from Dec. 15-Jan. 15. The additional antlerless elk hunting opportunities were designed with the help of the Breaks Elk Working Group to provide private landowners with more elk management options.

Bears Paw Elk
The Bears Paw elk survey, completed in March, is flown annually and includes HDs 680 and 690. There were a total of 647 elk observed, which is up 24% from last year and is currently 67% above the long-term average. Calf-cow ratios were average and bull-cow ratios were below the long-term average.
The management objective for the Bears Paw is 250 elk. With elk numbers over objective in the Bears Paw districts, FWP implemented similar opportunities as in the Breaks districts in 2016, including 100 antlerless elk permits and 100 antlerless elk B “shoulder season” licenses (apply by June 1). Again, these opportunities have continued and, starting this season, the shoulder season elk B licenses will be valid from Dec. 15-Jan. 15.

With elk numbers above the population objectives across the Region 6 elk management units, hunters should look into additional elk hunting opportunities available through the drawing. It is also a good reminder to secure permission on private lands early to make the most of the 2018 hunting season.

Tuesday, May 22nd 2018
Montana FWP completes Deer Survey
Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Region 6 biologists have completed their 2018 winter and spring aerial surveys of deer populations across northeastern Montana, which are used to help determine management recommendations. The surveys indicate above average numbers for mule deer, and mostly stable populations of whitetail deer across the region.
“Data collected during deer surveys are only one factor in deer management recommendations,” FWP Outlook-area biologist Ryan Williamson (and Region 6 deer specialist) explained. “The prior year’s harvest, weather, and habitat factors, as well as additional input gathered from landowners, hunters, the public and other agencies are all considered by the Fish and Wildlife Commission for season and quota setting decisions.”
Mule deer
For mule deer, 11 trend areas in Region 6 are typically examined each year from the air. The winter “post-season survey” was completed in January, and the “spring survey” was conducted in late April and May. While total deer counts tend to be variable, the 2018 surveys indicate mule deer are doing quite well. “Mule deer trends remain stable and well above average across most of the region,” Williamson said.
The 2018 post-hunting-season surveys showed the region-wide mule deer population at 74 percent above average, but 15 percent below the 2017 survey.
The 2018 spring surveys showed region-wide populations at 46 percent above average and remain the same as the last year’s spring survey. While regional numbers indicate above average mule deer levels overall, differences are seen across the region and in isolated areas as well. According to Williamson, mule deer from the 11 deer trend areas range from slightly below average to well above the average.
This same trend was seen in the deer fawn-to-adult ratios that are also calculated from the spring survey. Region wide, the fawn numbers continue to do quite well and remain above average.
“Fawn to adult ratio is an indicator of over-winter survival as well as new recruitment into the population,” Williamson said. “The 2018 survey showed 57 fawns to 100 adults across the region, which is slightly above the average of 53 fawns to 100 adults. These numbers were also similar to the 2017 survey.”
Winter mortality was variable across the region during the 2017-2018 winter with the highest impacts seen in localized areas around Malta and Havre. “Winter mortality was observed in western areas,” Williamson noted, “with mostly fawns succumbing to the winter weather.”
Although a long, tough winter was observed throughout the region, the eastern portion did not experience near the snow accumulation as seen throughout the western portion of the region in areas where near record snow depths and extreme cold temperatures were observed.
“The region experienced a wide range of abnormal weather in the last year. Much of the region experienced a significant drought in 2017, particularly the eastern portion, which had significant impact on habitat conditions,” says Williamson. “Fawns likely went into the harsh, long winter in poorer condition than normal which likely impacted overall winter survival.”
The mule deer appeared to have overwintered well. FWP Malta-area biologist Brett Dorak in Malta adds, “We understand there will be a variation in survival across the region, but overall things are looking great coming out of a bad winter.”
Another pressing factor in managing deer populations is the threat of chronic wasting disease (CWD) that was discovered last year in wild herds in Montana, both in Region 5 and Region 4. CWD has not yet been found in Region 6, but has been detected just across the Montana border in Alberta and Saskatchewan.
“It is just a matter of when and where CWD will be detected in Region 6,” says Williamson. “Higher deer densities tend to influence the spread of the disease, so we take that into consideration when developing hunting season regulations and the number of antlerless deer B-licenses available.”
For 2018, most of the hunting districts will be managed under the liberal regulations for mule deer, which includes either-sex for a general deer license (A-tag), as well as additional antlerless B-licenses.  “The liberal regulation package is expected in hunting districts, specifically along the Canadian border. As normal, hunting district 652 continues to be a limited permit district and will have a limited number of B-licenses available,” Williamson said.  “All hunting districts will have a varying number of mule deer B-licenses available this year, with the license application deadline on June 1.”
Whitetail deer
Whitetail deer populations continue to recover across the region as well. Due to more uniform habitat, the whitetail surveys tend to look at deer density, as opposed to total numbers, for trends. The 2018 year’s survey show whitetail deer density is at an average of 9.6 deer per square mile across the trend areas, which is approximately 10 percent below the long-term average of 10.7 deer per square mile. The 2017 surveys showed whitetails at right at long term average.
“Whitetail deer densities continue to recover in the eastern part of the region, but are still four percent below average, while the densities are still 33 percent below average along the Milk River near Glasgow,” Williamson said.
“A decade ago, whitetail densities were as high as 40-50 deer per square mile in some areas. This was an unsustainable level that was causing problems for landowners and degrading habitat conditions,” Williamson said. “EHD outbreaks and other factors in the following years reduced the whitetail population across Region 6 considerably.”
Although no significant EHD outbreaks have been seen since 2014, areas with higher deer densities along the Missouri River experienced small outbreaks of EHD in recent years.
With whitetail numbers increasing across Region 6, and in accordance with Fish and Wildlife Commission season setting, a single-region antlerless whitetail B-licenses will again be available for over the counter purchase starting August 6, 2018.  The licenses will be limited to one per hunter. Additionally for 2018, there will be a limited number of region-wide antlerless whitetail B-licenses available for this fall with applications due at the June 1 deadline.
Monday, May 21st 2018
Glasgow Youth To Walk In Their Father’s Footsteps
This May and early June some Glasgow youth and their leaders will abandon the comforts of modern living to trek across the Great Plains of Wyoming. Dressed in 1856-period costumes, they will walk about 20 miles over a four-day period pushing and pulling handcarts through sand and over rocky trails. Three nights, they will sleep on the hard prairie ground. Having only a few supplies and minimal shelter, they will be exposed to harsh elements, biting insects and fatigue.

The Pioneer Trek, sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, commemorates the suffering and miracles experienced by some 3,000 men, women, and children who walked across the Great Plains and over the Rocky Mountains seeking refuge in the Great Salt Lake Valley. These pioneers left behind all of their worldly goods – carrying with them only the life-sustaining essentials which could be managed in a 4’ by 4’ handcart.

Re-enacting a handcart trek provides youth an opportunity to intimately connect with real people and to personally experience the physical and emotional hardships these pioneers endured. Gordon B. Hinckley, former president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said: “It is good to look to the past to gain appreciation for the present and perspective for the future. It is good to look upon the virtues of those who have gone before, to gain strength for whatever lies ahead.”

Several Glasgow families who are participating in the Trek have linked their heritage to pioneers who trekked across the plains in the mid-1800’s. These include the John and Jane Bailey, Ann Barlow, and Stoddard families. Several other Glasgow families are also related to handcart pioneers.

Brad Mickelson, Bishop of the Glasgow Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints says: “The Pioneer Trek experience will strengthen the faith and character of our youth. The challenges they will face and overcome on the plains of Wyoming will make them stronger today and better citizens and leaders in the future”. He is a distant cousin to Levi Savage, one of the pioneers.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints sponsors Pioneer Treks at it three historic sites in central Wyoming. To learn more, visit https://history.lds.org. Search for “handcart sites”.

Monday, May 21st 2018
Glasgow Woman hoping to be Miss Montana
GLENDIVE - Abigail Helland is hoping to be the 69th Miss Montana as she competes again in the Miss Montana Scholarship program June 14-16 at the DCHS auditorium in Glendive. The 22 year old from Glasgow has been a finalist the last two years will sing and sign to music for talent.

Her parents are Peter and Allison Helland of Glasgow. Each contestant receives at least an $850 scholarship for participating.

Miss Montana receives a $5000 scholarship and the opportunity to represent Montana at the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City in September. Thanks to generous sponsors, the Miss America Organization is the nation’s leading advocate for women’s education and the largest provider of scholarships to young women in the USA.

Miss Montana 2017 Maddie Murray of Corvallis has driven over 32,000 miles this year sharing her message to school children to gift your gifts of service. Abigail’s message for school tours, if crowned Miss MT 2018 will be See Me- ending the stigma of mental illness.

The 2018 Miss Montana contestants are Toby-Jean Almy of Miles City; Jessica Criss, Bozeman; Kristy Cullinan, Glendive; Justiss Firemoon, Poplar; Laura Haller, Helena; Abigail Helland, Glasgow; Madison Kuehn of Bozeman; Rayna Laakso, Park City; Savannah Leidholt, Miles City and Julie Theis of Sidney.

Competing to be Miss Montana’s Outstanding Teen now held by Allie Baisch of Glendive are Taitlyn Berry of Glendive, Cammie Heck,Sidney; Rachel Jakovac of Helena, Sloan Orrell, Belgrade;Eden Paressini, Billings; Kinsey Ross, Bainville and Samantha Young of Glendive.

People can vote online at http://www.missmontana.com for contestants to become a finalist Saturday night and earn scholarship money.

Attend this fabulous production as young women compete in talent, evening gown, swimwear and interview to represent Montana. Tickets for the Miss Montana and Teen program are $15 Thursday, $20 Friday and $25 Saturday, or $50 for the package. Front center tickets are $60 for all three nights, available at http://www.missmontana.com, the Glendive Chamber or the Farm-to-Table Store. Tickets are also on sale at the door.

Sunday, May 20th 2018
Kiwanis Club BUG Program
Students from the Glasgow Middle School grades 6 and 7 were honored recently by the Kiwanis Club for bringing up their grades from one grading period to the next.

They were also served ice cream with toppings by Jim Williamson, Kiwanis President; Amber Swindler, Past-President, Lisa Kosi, board member, and Charles Wilson, club secretary.

The BUG (Bring Up Grades) program is a regular program of Kiwanis International, serving the children of the world. If you would like to get involved in community service through Kiwanis, contact any member of the Glasgow Kiwanis Club, or email Secretary Charles Wilson at mtkiwanis@gmail.com

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