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Latest Montana News
Sunday, May 1st 2016
Associated Press Montana News
Latest Montana news, sports, business and entertainment at 1:20 a.m. MDT
ELECTION ERROR

School district worried about clerical error on ballot issue

(Information from: The Montana Standard, http://www.mtstandard.com)

BUTTE, Mont. (AP) — The Butte School District is worried after a clerical error caused a tax measure to be left out of election notifications posted for voters.

State law requires the district to post notices and take out advertisements notifying the public about ballot measures more than 10 days prior to the election.

District officials say they forgot to include an $88,000 elementary levy from an advertisement placed in The Montana Standard.

According to the Montana Standard , district officials say voters will realize they are voting on several public school issues, including money for elementary schools, and it shouldn't be a problem.

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BRIDGER-TETON GUIDES

Forest Service eyes Jackson Hole guided shore fishing plan

(Information from: Jackson Hole (Wyo.) News And Guide, http://www.jhnewsandguide.com)

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — U.S. Forest Service officials are considering a proposal to open non-wilderness areas in northern Jackson Hole to guided day-use shore fishing.

The proposal involves portions of Pacific Creek, Spread Creek, Blackrock Creek and the Buffalo Fork of the Snake River in Bridger-Teton National Forest.

Under the proposal, total use would be capped at 600 guided shore fishing days a year, and no more than two guides a day would be allowed to take clients to the Buffalo Fork.

The Forest Service still has more study to do and public comment to take before acting on the plan.

Blackrock District Ranger Todd Stiles tells the Jackson Hole News & Guide that if approved, the soonest guided fishing could begin is around the summer 2017.

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PARK ROAD OPEN

Going-to-the-Sun Road partially reopened

(Information from: Great Falls Tribune, http://www.greatfallstribune.com)

WEST GLACIER, Mont. (AP) — The Going-to-the-Sun Road is open to vehicles as far as Avalanche for people who want to hike and bicycle the road before it opens to vehicles.

Officials say hikers and bikers can travel on the road as far as the restriction signs while crews are working Monday through Friday to clear the highway.

They are also warning of the possibility of avalanches and debris on the road.

The Great Falls Tribune reports the road is open to vehicles on the east side of the park as far as Rising Sun.

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HARDIN JAIL CLOSURE

Hardin jail closes due to lack of prisoners

(Information from: The Billings Gazette, http://www.billingsgazette.com)

HARDIN, Mont. (AP) — A private prison in Hardin has suspended operations due to a lack of inmates.

The Billings Gazette reports that the Two Rivers Regional Detention Center stopped holding prisoners on April 13. Warden Ken Keller says employees were sent home and only Keller and his program manager are still in the building.

The 464-bed facility has been struggling for years. Last fall, the Bureau of Indian Affairs cut its contract with the prison. Many employees were furloughed in January but a few inmates remained in the center from small contracts with individual tribes and with Williams County, North Dakota.

The prison is paid on a per-inmate, per-day basis through contracts. With empty beds, the facility acquired debt that reached as much as $40 million in December.

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COAL EXPORT-REVIEW

Review analyzes impacts of Wash. coal-export terminal

SEATTLE (AP) — State and local regulators say a coal-export terminal proposed along the Columbia River in southwest Washington could have some unavoidable significant impacts on greenhouse gases emissions, vessel traffic and rail safety.

A draft environmental review released Friday says carbon emissions would increase by 2.5 million metric tons a year when the proposed facility near Longview is fully operating. Other concerns include increased vessel traffic and the potential for train accidents as up to 16 train trips are added each day.

The Millennium Bulk Terminals-Longview facility would handle up to 44 million metric tons of coal a year. Coal would arrive on train from Montana, Wyoming and other states to be loaded on ships for export to Asia.

Millennium CEO Bill Chapman on Friday said the company is a step closer to creating jobs in Longview while meeting the state's strict environmental standards.

Opponents say moving millions of tons of coal through the state and along the Columbia River would harm people's health and the environment.

RIVER RESCUE-CHILD

Deputy rescues 2-year-old child from Yellowstone River

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A Yellowstone County sheriff's deputy rescued a 2-year-old boy who fell into the Yellowstone River.

Capt. Bill Michaelis says the deputy had responded to a report at 9:20 a.m. Friday that a 2-year-old and 5-year-old were missing. The boys' father had driven their mother to work and when he returned home the children weren't there.

Deputy Adam Lauwers spotted the boys along the river bank at 9:43 a.m.

Michaelis says Lauwers saw the 2-year-old fall into the river and quickly jumped into the 40-degree water and rescued the boy.

The boy was taken to the hospital, but was expected to be OK.

Saturday, April 30th 2016
Associated Press Montana News
Latest Montana news, sports, business and entertainment at 1:20 a.m. MDT
RIVER RESCUE-CHILD

Deputy rescues 2-year-old child from Yellowstone River

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A Yellowstone County sheriff's deputy rescued a 2-year-old boy who fell into the Yellowstone River.

Capt. Bill Michaelis says the deputy had responded to a report at 9:20 a.m. Friday that a 2-year-old and 5-year-old were missing. The boys' father had driven their mother to work and when he returned home the children weren't there.

Deputy Adam Lauwers spotted the boys along the river bank at 9:43 a.m.

Michaelis says Lauwers saw the 2-year-old fall into the river and quickly jumped into the 40-degree water and rescued the boy.

The boy was taken to the hospital, but was expected to be OK.

CONRAD BURNS-FUNERAL

Conrad Burns' funeral next Friday at Metra Park Arena

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The funeral service for former U.S. Sen. Conrad Burns will be held on Friday, May 6 at 11 a.m. at Metra Park Arena in Billings.

The public is invited to attend.

Burns died Thursday of natural causes at his home in Billings. He was 81.

Burns' family issued a statement Friday saying he was a loving, dedicated husband and proud father whose greatest joy was his three grandchildren.

The family requests that anyone wishing to make a donation in his honor to make them to Shriners Hospitals for Children, your local food bank or the Kate Burns Memorial Scholarship through the Atonement Lutheran Church in Billings. Cards can be sent to the family c/o U.S. Rep. Ryan Zinke's office at 222 N. 32nd St., Suite 900, Billings, MT, 59101.

BILLIONAIRE'S BANKRUPTCY

Jailed Montana resort founder invokes right to silence

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The jailed founder of a Montana resort for the ultra-rich says he won't answer a judge's demands to reveal what happened to hundreds of millions of dollars in assets sought by his creditors.

Yellowstone Club founder Timothy Blixseth invoked his Fifth Amendment right to remain silent to avoid self-incrimination in court documents filed Thursday.

Simultaneously, Blixseth declared bankruptcy in California for a financial trust his creditors allege was used to hide his assets.

Courts have ruled Blixseth fraudulently transferred $286 million from the Yellowstone Club prior to its 2008 bankruptcy.

He's been in jail for a year for contempt of court, but has not been criminally charged.

Blixseth's attorney Phillip DeFelice said the bankruptcy filing will allow Blixseth to maximize the value of his assets and begin paying off creditors.

CHILD DEATH-ENDANGERMENT

Woman charged with child endangerment in baby's death

(Information from: Great Falls Tribune, http://www.greatfallstribune.com)

GREAT FALLS, Mont. (AP) — A Great Falls woman faces a felony criminal endangerment charge in the death of her 10-month-old daughter, who prosecutors say had been exposed to methamphetamine and whose body was found in a "freezing cold" room in January.

The Great Falls Tribune reports Misty Marie Cutburth was arrested Thursday. She was scheduled to make an initial appearance Friday afternoon in District Court in Cascade County. Prosecutors said she would be appointed a public defender.

Charging documents say the state Division of Child and Family Services received two reports in October 2015 from people concerned about the mother's drug use. Court records say the girl had been seen by a doctor on Jan. 7 for croup and had been prescribed steroids. She died five days later.

An investigation has not been able to determine the girl's cause of death.

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CROW GAME WARDEN-POACHING

Montana Crow Tribe game warden convicted of poaching elk

(Information from: Casper (Wyo.) Star-Tribune, http://www.trib.com)

SHERIDAN, Wyo. (AP) — A jury has convicted a Montana tribal game warden of poaching in northern Wyoming.

After the jury in Sheridan returned its verdict Friday, Circuit Court Judge Shelley A. Cundiff sentenced Clayvin Herrera to one year of unsupervised probation and fined him $7,500.

In addition, the Casper Star-Tribune reports that Herrera is not allowed to hunt in any state for the next three years. However, the restriction does not apply to Herrera's right to hunt on the Crow Reservation in Montana. Herrera is a member of the Crow Tribe.

Herrera maintained the he thought he was on the Crow Reservation in Montana when he killed an antlered elk in January 2014.

Prosecutors said the elk was taken about a mile inside Wyoming.

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COAL EXPORT-REVIEW

Review analyzes impacts of Wash. coal-export terminal

SEATTLE (AP) — State and local regulators say a coal-export terminal proposed along the Columbia River in southwest Washington could have some unavoidable significant impacts on greenhouse gases emissions, vessel traffic and rail safety.

A draft environmental review released Friday says carbon emissions would increase by 2.5 million metric tons a year when the proposed facility near Longview is fully operating. Other concerns include increased vessel traffic and the potential for train accidents as up to 16 train trips are added each day.

The Millennium Bulk Terminals-Longview facility would handle up to 44 million metric tons of coal a year. Coal would arrive on train from Montana, Wyoming and other states to be loaded on ships for export to Asia.

Millennium CEO Bill Chapman on Friday said the company is a step closer to creating jobs in Longview while meeting the state's strict environmental standards.

Opponents say moving millions of tons of coal through the state and along the Columbia River would harm people's health and the environment.

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