KLTZ/MIX-93 JUNE 2000 NEWS ARCHIVE


JUNE EVENTS

JUNE OBITS


GLASGOW THE WETTEST IN THE STATE
THEATRE FIRE EXIT DOOR INSTALLED (6/29)
BAUCUS ANNOUNCES THAT THE HATCHERY HAS PASSED COMMITTEE (6/29)
REUNION UPDATE/RECAP (6/28)
BURNS SAYS HE STILL SUPPORTS ETHANOL (6/27)
BURNS SAYS HE HAS COMMITMENT ON HATCHERY (6/27)
LONGEST DAM RUN OVERVIEW (6/25)
REUNION UPDATE 6/23
HATCHERY STAMPS SELLING FAST (6/22)
REHBERG STOPS IN GLASGOW (6/22)
SCOTT NAMED SUPERINTENDENT (6/22)
BURNS' INTERIOR FUNDING MAKES FIRST CUT (6/20)
OKLAHOMA TRYOUTS SET(6/20)
REUNION UPDATE (6/19)
SCHOOL BOARD FILLS POSITIONS (6/16)
NASHUA SCHOOL BOARD RE-HIRES BRAATEN; PETERSON INTERIM SUPERINTENDENT (6/14)
FORT PECK LAKE ROAD ENHANCEMENT MAKES FIRST CUT (6/14)
ANNIE KICKS OFF FORT PECK SUMMER THEATRE SEASON (6/13)
FSA TO OFFER FACILITY LOANS (6/13)
MONTANA HOPE PROJECT FUNDRAISER (6/13)
COMMUNITY BLOCK GRANTS INCLUDE VALLEY COUNTY (6/12)
TAKING DOWN OLD ELEVATOR (6/11)
JODY'S UNDERGOING UPGRADE (6/11)
MONTANA PSC TO CO-HOST FEDERAL-STATE CONFERENCE ON ADVANCED TELECOM SERVICES (6/11)
TORNADO TOUCHES DOWN IN NORTHEAST MONTANA (6/8)
UNEMPLOYMENT RATES, APRIL, 2000
BILL WOULD CURB FEDERAL LAND GRABS
GREASE TRYOUTS SET FOR THIS WEEKEND (6/7)
ELECTION 2000 RESULTS

VOTING LOCATIONS FOR ELECTION

TEACHERS GET RAISE AT SPECIAL SCHOOL BOARD SESSION (6/2)
BURNS CALLS FOR MORE DROUGHT RELEIF (6/1)
FORMER BIA ENGINEER ADMITS THEFT (6/1)
CMR FIRE PICTURES (6/1)
 

GLASOW WETTEST IN THE STATE (6/29)
(Undated-AP) -- Drought is deepening across much of Montana, and weather observers say the rainfall in June -- traditionally one of the wettest months -- was not sufficient. Mel White, with the U-S Geological Survey, says most of the rain that did come soaked into the ground and didn't run off. One of the few bright spots in the state is Glasgow. So far in June, the Glasgow area has had 3-point-66 inches of rain, which is well above the average of 1-point-83 inches. Ken Mielke (MELK'-ee), with the National Weather Service in Great Falls, says the outlook for July through September is for normal temperatures and normal precipitation in eastern Montana. Western Montana could be slightly warmer than normal. Mel White, of the geological survey, says there may still be cause for hope. He says Montana had similar dry conditions in June 1992, but received some fairly intense rain in July and August. (Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
THEATRE FIRE EXIT DOOR INSTALLED (6/29)
Earnings from the Fort Peck Theatre Preservation Foundation paid for installation of a fire exit door at the Fort Peck Theatre this spring. The Annie kids take a moment between scenes to show it off. The door is located in the area under the stage and it exits to the west. Braden Pehlke of Glasgow contracted the installation. It required a special tool that cut through the foot-thick concrete wall. The window of the door provides welcome additional light to the basement area. Earnings from the Preservation Foundation are used to care for and maintain the theatre building and grounds. Its balance is $28,296.21, and gifts of all kinds are welcome. For more information, contact Cindy Markle at 228-8090.
BAUCUS ANNOUNCES THAT THE HATCHERY HAS PASSED COMMITTEE (6/29)
U.S. Senator Max Baucus announced on Wednesday that the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, of which he is the top Democrat, passed the Fort peck Warm Water Fish Hatchery proposal as a part of the Water Resources Development Act, a bill that approves U.S. Army Corps of Engineers projects across the country.

Baucus also said he will host the top official for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Joseph Westphal, in a visit next week to Livingston, Billings and Fort Peck.

"This bill will give a shot in the arm to the Fort Peck and Glasgow economies by boosting recreational opportunities in the area and creating jobs when the hatchery is built," Baucus said. "The hatchery is going to be a great boon to the economy of the Fort Peck area and will enhance our natural resources and recreation."
Baucus amended the measure that passed to increase the authorization to $20 million in funding for the hatchery project.

The original bill would have authorized only half that, at $10 million dollars. However, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers new estimates were closer to $20 million for construction of the hatchery.

"I amended the bill to $20 million because we can't risk having to come back and ask for more," Baucus said after the committee approved the bill. "The hatchery project is way too important to worry about having to come back to the committee again."

The project will establish a hatchery for native fish recovery and for warm-water fish such as walleye and small-mouth bass, as well as other species that have been hit by heavy fishing pressure in recent years. The hatchery will be located on 100 acres of federal land south of the Dredge Cuts in Fort Peck and will be staffed by two to three employees, Baucus said.

Baucus said the hatchery proposal has the support of local community leaders, economic development groups, and sportsmen associations, and will be a partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks. The provision dealing with the Fort Peck Fish Hatchery also requires the state of Montana and local sponsors to contribute 25% of the total cost of the project.

Last month, Baucus met in Washington D.C. with Westphal, the assistant secretary for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, to garner his support for the project. Baucus said the full Senate should consider the measure by late July.
Baucus also announced that Westphal will visit Montana next week to see the Fort Peck Hatchery site.

"I've invited Dr. Westphal to Montana so he can see first-hand how important this project is," Baucus said. "The passage of this bill means jobs and opportunities for Montanans. It's a bill that's good for Montana and Fort Peck, and I'm going to do all that I can to make sure it passes."

In 1997, Baucus was successful in including the Fort Peck Dam Interpretive Center and Museum in the federal highway funding bill that passed through the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. The senior Senator said he hopes to do the same with the fish hatchery through the WRDA bill.
REUNION UPDATE/RECAP (6/27)
Here's the latest on the All Class Reunion:
Each class is responsible for organizing their own photo session with Image Photography. Image Photography is available from 10:00 A.M until 1:00 P.M. on Saturday, July 1, 2000 in front of the Grandstands.
NEW LISTING The class of 1952 will meet informally on Saturday, July 1st, from 1-5pm at the home of Bob Jackson, 284 Skylark Road. Any questions, call 367-5345.
NEW LISTING Class of 1935 Dinner at the Elks Club, Friday, June 30, 2000, 7:00 P.M.
NEW LISTING Class of 1968 Get together, Alvie Hallock residence, 702 Hillside Drive, Friday, June 30,2000, 6:00 P.M.
NEW LISTING Class of 1992 No Host Cocktail Party, Oasis Lounge, Saturday, July 1, 2000, 5:00 P.M.
UPDATE Class of 1975 will meet at Dana Wagenhals, 6 miles north on Highway 24 or as it was referred to back then “the base highway”. Turn right at mile marker 6. Gathering time 7:00 P.M.
The corner window of the former Woolworth building has all the posters for the class gatherings that did not get into the schedule that is inserted in the registration packets. There are also posters outlining the open container area for the weekend, the parade route, schedule of main events for the weekend and the schedule of class gatherings. Posters of the entertainment for the weekend are also located in this window.
In 1987 the All Class Reunion book containing the graduating classes of 1908-1987 was published. There are some of these books still available. A new book with the classes of 1988-2000 will be on sale for $10.00. These books can be purchased at the Hospitality Room located under the grandstands. Order forms will also be available for the 1988-2000 book.
Other notes:
Help is needed with registration for the All Class Reunion. Also helpers are needed for the Bop-A-Dips on Sat. July 1st; if anyone is interested in selling buttons or helping the band call Gloria Flatow at 228-9477 or Brenda Leckie at 228-4246. Anyone wanting to help with the parade call Bill Murch at 228-9479 or Gene Hartsock at 228-9288, they need the help of 2-3 people.
The Friends of the Pioneer Museum is hosting the Hospitality Room/Gift Shop during the All Class Reunion & will be displaying memorabilia & artifacts from years past. If you have anything of this nature that would be of interest to the alumni contact Doris Franzen at 228-2082 or bring it to their location under the grandstands by noon on Thurs. June 29th.
Any class with updates to their gathering information should provide the reunion committee with two posters; one will be placed at the registration table for that class, the other in a window of the former Woolworth Building.
If you are a senior citizen, the Valley County Senior Center would like you to pull your boat in the All School Reunion Parade on July 1st at 2p.m. Call 228-9223 or 263-3436 to leave your name & number.
We would like the Scottie Band to play in the parade on Saturday, but need help in contancting band members and organizing them. For more information, call Sandy Dungan at 228-8687 or Carl Dix at 228-8657.
HIGHLIGHTS
Registration under the grandstand at the fairgrounds, from 11-5
Reds Alumni Baseball Doubleheader, starting at 5pm Friday night at Bill Connors Field
Street Dance featuring the John Jackson Show on Friday night, 9pm
Eighteen Hole Three Person Scramble Golf Tournament sponsored by the Dale Vegge Memorial, Saturday at 8:00 A.M. at Sunnyside Golf Club
Alumni Walk/Run starting at Alumni Park at 9am Saturday
Parade on Saturday at 2pm
Car/Motorcycle show on Saturday right after the parade
All teachers, current and past, as well as students are encouraged to attend the Teacher Reception after the parade in the Scottie Hospitality Room at the Fairgrounds
Art & Craft Show, Saturday, July 1, 2000 at Southside School, 10:00 A.M.- 4:00 P.M.
Quilt Show, Friday and Saturday at the Irle School from 10:00 A.M.-4:00 P.M.
Dance featuring the Bop-A-Dips, July 1, 2000, Fairgrounds from 9:00 P.M.-1:00 A.M.
Fireworks, Saturday, July 1, 2000, approximately 11:00 P.M.
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Community Worship Service, Sunday, July 2, 2000 at 10:00 A.M.
4-H Breakfast under the Grandstands, Saturday, July 1, 2000, 10:30 P.M. – 3:00 A.M.
Dedication of GHS Memorial Walk – Alumni Park, Sunday, July 2, 2000, 11:30 A.M.
Tribute to L.J. Baker honoring his contributions to Scouting - Alumni Park, Sunday, July 2, 2000, 2:00 P.M.
BURNS SAYS HE STILL SUPPORTS ETHANOL (6/27)
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Montana Senator Conrad Burns today reaffirmed his longstanding support for ethanol, but noted many problems still plague the emerging industry.

Speaking to a conference of Montana’s ethanol producers and consumers in Red Lodge, Burns emphasized the need to concentrate on the marketing and transportation of ethanol.

Burns said he has consistently supported ethanol producers, including voting for ethanol tax credits that benefit ethanol plants nationwide, annually supporting ethanol research funding, and pushing a bill that would increase ethanol research at the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

“We have built many ethanol plants in rural America,” Burns said. “Unfortunately, some of them now lay dormant, and a lot of rural investors took pretty hard hits. We do not want to see that happen again.

“Ethanol is a great way to reduce our dependence on foreign oil imports and find a larger market for our agricultural products. We have to focus on increasing consumption before we turn our sights entirely to production. There will be investments made in the production of ethanol, but without consumers, increasing production will only lead to more closed plants.

“We also have to think about transporting ethanol. We’re having trouble building pipelines to carry petroleum, and we’ll face the same issues building pipelines to carry ethanol if we build a bunch of plants without having the transportation infrastructure in place. Just look at the problem we had trying to approve a portion of a pipeline that was only 30 miles long to connect Billings to the Spokane market. It seems to me that we can transport the raw ingredients, like Montana grains, pretty easily, so we might want to look at retrofitting our refineries in Montana and elsewhere to accommodate ethanol.”
Burns also noted that ethanol producers had to be careful not to allow the industry to be dominated by one company.

“Right now, Archer Daniels Midland dominates ethanol production. If the Environmental Protection Agency continues to tighten regulations and Congress does not offer investment incentives that reach out to small refineries, we will end up with even greater concentration in the ethanol market. Right now, there is no guarantee that producers other than Archer Daniels Midland will benefit from some of the legislation currently being proposed.”

Burns participated in the conference via teleconference.

Burns is a member of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, which oversees many energy related issues.
BURNS SAYS COMMITMENT SECURED ON HATCHERY (6/27)
WASHINGTON, D.C. — Montana Senator Conrad Burns today secured a commitment from a key committee chairman that Burns’ Fort Peck hatchery bill will be included in the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA), which the committee will vote on tomorrow. After months of discussion, Senator Bob Smith (R-N.H.), chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, promised Burns that he will include the hatchery bill in WRDA, which authorizes Army Corps of Engineers projects throughout the nation.

“The Water Resources Development Act will be moving through Congress shortly, and Senator Smith’s commitment means that my Fort Peck hatchery bill will move with it,” Burns said. “This project could not have made it this far without all of the hard work that local folks have put into it. It’s exciting to see people at the local, state and federal levels all working together for a common goal. Not only are we getting very close to achieving that goal, but we’re getting very close to making Montana’s economy and waters healthier.”

Burns’ bill authorizes $20 million for the construction of a warm-water, multi-species hatchery using the findings from an Army Corps of Engineers’ feasibility study. Burns earlier spearheaded an effort to get the Army Corps of Engineers to devote $125,000 for the study. In addition, private Montana companies and other entities offered $125,000 in matching funds for the study.

The state has only one other warm-water fish hatchery, which is located in Miles City. That hatchery is already running at maximum capacity. Burns said he hopes that the Fort Peck hatchery will contribute to increased recreation in eastern Montana and improve the strength of fish populations in Montana’s rivers and lakes.
The project began a year and a half ago when a group of Montanans began pushing the idea. Working with Walleyes Unlimited of Montana and other groups, Citizens for the Fort Peck Fish Hatchery has successfully brought the project closer and closer to being a reality.

The Montana Legislature also threw its support behind the hatchery, passing a bill that creates a hatchery stamp that will be sold along with Montana fishing licenses. Proceeds from the stamp will be used for operation and maintenance of the project.

LONGEST DAM RUN OVERVIEW (6/25)
About 340 people registered for the 6th annual Longest Dam Run, held Saturday at Kiwanis Park at the foot of Fort Peck Dam. The family event featured a 10K run, 5K run and walk and a 1 mile walk and run through the nature trail at Kiwanis Park. For the first year in quite a while, the weather was cooperative: winds were under 20mph from the southeast, and temperatures were in the sixties on Saturday morning.

In the 10K, Jake Zimmerman and Mary Tessmer were repeat winners. Zimmerman ran high school track and cross country for Wolf Point and currently runs on the MSU-Billings cross country team. He finished the 6.2 mile course with a time of 38:23. Mary (Weber) Tessmer of Highlands Ranch, Colorado, a 1984 grad of GHS, won the women's 10K with a time of 46:23.

In the 5K run, John Wetsit of Wolf Point won the men's division with a time of 17:22 for the 3.1 mile course. Bethany Long of Wolf Point was the first woman finisher, with a time of 20:45.

For the 5K walk, Rich Studsrud of Williston, North Dakota, was first with a time of 33:25, while Kim Monson was the top women's finisher and second overall with a time of 35:04.

In the 1 mile walk/run, Brett Bates of Wolf Point was first overall with a time of 5:46, while Maria Schuster of Wolf Point was the first female finisher, with a time of 7:22. She finished 6th overall. For complete results, pictures and age group breakdowns, see our Longest Dam Run pages at http://www.kltz.com/dam.html


REUNION UPDATE 6/23

The Reunion committee held their last pre-event meeting on Thursday night, and here are the details. First, if you're still looking for room, try these:

Anyone needing RV space can call 406-262-2330 for HiLine Trailer Court
Max Barnes has room for two. He may be reached at 406-228-2696
Jack Billingsley has space available. He has a 12x54' two bedroom trailer with bath, a 12x20' bunk with double occupancy and bath and an 8x10 bunk house with no private bath. Jack can be reached at 406-367-5577.

As for the parade: The awards to be given out are entitled Mayor Award, Superintendant of Schools Award, Alumni Award, Chamber of Commerce Award. Each winner will receive a plaque. Also, the Miles City band will be playing in the parade.

Any class with updates to their gathering information should provide the reunion committee with two posters. One will be placed at the appropriate registration table and the other in a window of the former Woolworth building. Speaking of updates, here is an update for the class of 1950:

Class of 1950 gathering at Bob Jackson's house, 284 Skylark Road, in Glasgow, Montana, 59230 on Saturday, July 1, from 1-5pm. 406-367-5345.

The Glasgow Reds Alumni baseball doubleheader is set for June 30th at Bill Connors field featuring two 7-inning games, at 5 and 7 pm. As of June 22, 20 players were signed up to play, and more are needed. If you’re a former Reds player and would like to play, call Chad Maczka at 406-228-8782.

AND, LOTS OF VOLUNTEERS ARE STILL NEEDED!

We are looking for people to help with registration. If anyone can help they are asked to call Kim Lacey at 406-228-8128. We need helpers for the Bop-A-Dips on Saturday. We need people to sell buttons. If anyone is interested in helping the band or selling buttons they can contact Gloria Flatow at 406-228-9477 or Brenda Leckie at 406-228-4246. The parade committee needs the help of two or three people. Anyone wanting to help with the parade can contact Bill Murch at406- 228-9479 or Gene Hartsock at 406-228-9288.

 


HATCHERY STAMPS SELLING FAST (6/22)
State Representative Sam Kitzenberg has good news regarding the sale of the warm water fish stamps that are being used to benefit the Fort Peck Warm Water Fish Hatchery.

Kitzenberg told Kltz/Mix 93 news that as of April 30th a total of 20,500 stamps had been sold to Montana fishermen and that has raised approximately $93,000 to be used for the development and operation of the Fort Peck Hatchery.
Kitzenberg also said that according to the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks there are 40,000 to 60,000 stamps that are in the possession of licensed dealers. Kitzenberg said if you take even the lowest possible number it's likely the stamp has raised over $200,000.

There have been some problems though in getting the stamp out to the general public. Kitzenberg mentioned one instance in Billings where a sporting goods store ran out of the stamps and then posted a notice that a person buying a fishing license need not buy the stamp because no one was going to be enforcing the law. Kitzenberg was in contact with the Governors office this week and the problem has now been taken care of.

Money that is raised from the stamp will be used for the operation of the warm water hatchery once it is completed. There is legislation pending in Congress that would authorize and fund the hatchery.
REHBERG STOPS IN GLASGOW (6/22)
Republican Congressional candidate Denny Rehberg was in Glasgow on Wednesday morning and stopped by the Kltz/Klan radio station studios. Rehberg talked about his campaign against Democrat Nancy Keenan. He mentioned that he currently is visiting all 56 Montana counties meeting with as many people as possible. He said that most people are paying much attention to issues at this time and won't until the election gets closer. He said that he does plan on campaigning full time until the general election.

Rehberg also said that even though he is just a candidate for the U.S. Congress he already has made an impact on an issue that affects eastern Montana. Rehberg has used his influence with Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Dennis Hastert to move along a bill that would authorize the Dry Prairie Rural Water Project. The bill was stuck in a sub-committee in the House and Rehberg flew to Washington D.C. and met with the chairman of the committee and explained to him the importance of the project and Rehberg now says the bill is moving through the House and stands a very good chance of being approved this year. The Dry Prairie Rural Water Project would provide Missouri River water to most of northeastern Montana and would be a huge economic boost to the region.
SCOTT NAMED SUPERINTENDENT (6/22)
The Valley County Commissioners have appointed Edith Scott as the new Valley County Superintendent of Schools. Scott began her job earlier this month replacing Donna Kloker who resigned earlier this year and is moving from the area.

Scott will fill the remaining two and one-half years left of the unexpired term of Kloker.

Edith Scott just retired from 34 years of teaching in the public school system. She taught art and math at the Glasgow Middle School for the past 13 years and she has also taught all the grades between one and four.
BURNS' INTERIOR FUNDING MAKES FIRST CUT (6/20)
Montana Senator Conrad Burns today announced that the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee approved over $37 million for various Burns- requested projects in Montana.

"Montana is a state rich in natural resources and natural beauty, and this bill addresses both sides of that coin," Burns said. "In this bill, Montana is in line for millions of dollars that will be used for a variety of projects, including responsible conservation projects, bringing high-speed fiber optic lines to reservations, and improving the sewer systems in Glacier and Yellowstone National Parks."

Burns, who is a member of the Senate Interior Appropriations Subcommittee, was successful in getting approval for the following Montana projects:
• $8 million for the implementation of the Rocky Boy Water Project, a water program for the Rocky Boy Reservation and the surrounding area that Burns earlier pushed through Congress. Burns is seeking additional funds in the Energy and Water Appropriations Bill.
• $5.077 million for sewer upgrades in Yellowstone National Park.
• $5 million for maintenance and snow removal on the Beartooth Highway.
• $4.544 million for upgrades to the sewage treatment system in Glacier National Park.
• $2 million for the construction of a fiber optic system through the Crow, Fort Peck and Northern Cheyenne Reservations. The lines will be used for distance learning and telemedicine projects to benefit the communities. This is a joint project between Rocky Mountain College and Deaconess Billings Clinic and the respective tribal colleges and health care facilities.
• $2 million for research on whirling disease, including $700,000 for continued study at Montana State University-Bozeman.
• $2 million for management initiatives along the Upper Missouri, including $1 million for the Undaunted Stewardship program and $1 million for Lewis and Clark Bicentennial preparations.
• $1.75 million for the Centennial Valley Conservation Project in Southwest Montana.
• $1.6 million for completion of the Bozeman Fish Technology Center.
• $1 million to continue the Western Montana Project to secure conservation easements in the Blackfoot Valley and Ninepipe areas to preserve wildlife habitat.
• $1 million for the Montana Cadastral Mapping Project, which will use satellites to provide digital maps of public and private land ownership.
• $1 million for construction of a “raceway enclosure” at the cold water fish hatchery in Ennis.
• $1 million for the Montana National Center for Landscape Fire Analysis at the University of Montana in Missoula. The center will use satellites and other technologies to research catastrophic forest fires in order to combat them more effectively.
• $750,000 for the implementation of a Coldwater Habitat Conservation Plan for bull trout in Montana. (This is part of a larger $1.5 million Montana/Idaho project.)
• $500,000 for noxious weed research at Montana State University-Bozeman.
• $400,000 for engineering and survey work for the construction of a visitor center at Fort Benton.
• $250,000 for construction of a dam at the Lake Thibadeau National Wildlife Refuge near Havre.
• $250,000 for the INPSYCH program at the University of Montana in Missoula. The program is designed to get more Indian students involved in undergraduate and graduate psychology programs.
• $200,000 for the Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center for ecological and genetic research in Bozeman.
• $100,000 for the Grizzly Citizen’s Management program, which gives local people a voice in the grizzly reintroduction efforts in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness.

The bill also includes the following provisions that will impact Montana:
• Montana will receive a portion of a $10 million increase in payments in lieu of taxes (PILT) funding, for a total of $145 million for the program.
• Montana will receive a substantial portion of $5 million for activities and construction in National Parks that relates to the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial celebration.
• A provision would prohibit the Forest Service from increasing fees for running fiber optic cables through their lands.
• The bill authorizes nine new stewardship projects in Forest Service Region 1 that includes Montana. There are a total of 28 projects in the nation.
• A permanent provision was included that allows ranchers with grazing permits to continue using Bureau of Land Management(BLM) lands while environmental reviews are complete.

The Senate Appropriations Committee, of which Burns is also a member, is expected to consider the bill this Thursday. The bill will then be ready for action by the full Senate.
OKLAHOMA! TRYOUTS SET FOR JUNE 26 (6/20)
Tryouts for the musical Oklahoma are scheduled Monday, June 26, at 6 p.m. at the Fort Peck Theatre in Fort Peck. Performers should come prepared to sing 12 to 16 bars of any song and recite a memorized passage of one or two minutes in length. For more information, contact the Theatre at 526-9943.
REUNION UPDATE (6/19)
The Glasgow All Class Reunion committee is holding the final parade meeting tonight at 7pm in the Community Room of the courthouse. This is the last meeting before the parade and everyone is encouraged to attend. Also, the reunion committee will have one last meeting on Thursday, June 22nd at 7pm at the Elks Club.

A note on the fireworks display: the June 1st Saturday night show will be the only fireworkds display in Glasgow. There will not be a display in Glasgow on the 4th of July. Also, the Saturday evening display will be shot from the "G" on the west end of town.

And, one more note: alumni and all current, former and retired teachers are invited to the teachers reception following the parade at the Hospitality Room at the fairgrounds.

SCHOOL BOARD FILLS POSITIONS (6/20)
At the Glasgow School Board meeting on Wednesday night, the board decided to look at making golf more competetive. The school is looking to cut the size of the team to no more than 15 members.

Personnel issues included the resignation of Head girls basketball coach Todd Glaser from the Glasgow school system and Rod Karst from the head track position. John LaBonty will replace Karst as head track coach. LaBonty was previously Middle School head track coach, and head high school volleyball coach. Karst will stay on as head cross country coach and has been named head volleyball coach. Other hirings include Ryan Rebson of Broadus, Montana, as head librarian. He will also be head boys and girls basketball coach.

Wade Nelson has been hired as a 6th grade teacher, Heather Losleven, formerly of Malta, has been hired as Middle School English teacher. Chuck Barstad has been hired as Middle School P.E. instructor. Shantell Zeiger will be the new Middle School Special Education instructor. Annette Fassett has been hired as a part-time kindergarten teacher at Irle School. Toby Klind has been hired as a 3rd grade teacher, and the new cook at Irle School is Eileen Miller, formerly of Bozeman.

Gary Stidman has been hired as Middle School Site Manager, but no one has been hired for the high school spot. These positions were created to take the place the place of athletic director.

The board is also looking at having some work done on the parking lot and will work with Valley County on getting road millings next year. Also in the plans is a drive-through area closer to the front doors than the access allows.

The school district and the city of Glasgow have been working on the paperwork for land swaps on Scottie Pride Drive and 8th street. Also, resurfacing of the Glasgow High School track is set to start Monday morning, June 19th.

In academic news, Glasgow schools have purchased new math books titled: Focus on Algebra I, Focus on Algebra II and Focus on Geometry.

Also, all schools received regular accreditation this year. The school district will have a surplus property sale on July 10th at the administration office bus barn complex, with "something for everyone."


NASHUA SCHOOL BOARD RE-HIRES BRAATEN; PETERSON INTERIM SUPERINTENDENT (6/14)
The Nashua School Board Tuesday night re-hired Norm Braaten as the head boys basketball coach of the Nashua Porcupines.

Last month the school board decided to hold off on renewing Braaten's coaching contract and open up the job to other applicants. Nashua superintendent Dave Kloker told Kltz/Mix 93 news that the school received two applications for the job including Braaten.

The school board voted 4-1 to re-hire Braaten for the upcoming school year. The lone dissenting vote came from school board member Jim Kirkland.

The Nashua school board also voted to hire Ryen Falkenstern as the activities director at Nashua. He replaces John Jones who retired from the school district last month.

Nashua is still looking for a head football coach and a head volleyball coach.
Kloker also told Kltz/Mix 93 news that Bruce Peterson has been hired as the new interim superintendent at Nashua pending the outcome of contract negotiations between the school board and Peterson. Peterson will replace Kloker who is leaving for the superintendents job in Bridger.
FORT PECK LAKE ROAD ENHANCEMENT MAKES FIRST CUT (6/14)

Montana Senator Conrad Burns announced this week that the Senate Subcommittee on Transportation has approved a funding bill that contains more than $17 million in projects in Montana. He said there are no guarantees what the final bill would look like, but the most critical step in the process is getting the funding included at the subcommittee level. The projects are scattered throughout the state, including the Six County Fort Peck Road Coalition project.

The coalition is a group of counties surrounding the lake. The money will be used to approve access to the lake in Valley, Garfield, McCone, Phillips, Petroleum and Fergus counties.


ANNIE KICKS OFF FORT PECK SUMMER THEATRE SEASON (6/13)
A talented cast and improvements to the sound system will greet theatergoers this weekend as Annie opens Friday at the Fort Peck Summer Theatre in Fort Peck. Artistic Director Bobby Gutierrez has cast 34 Valley County residents in the production. A reception in the Theatre lobby following the opening night performance will honor the cast and crew, and everyone is welcome to attend. The curtain rises for Annie at 8 p.m., on Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings through July 9. Tickets are available at the door, priced at $10 for adults, $9 for seniors and $6 for students. Season tickets, which save $2 per admission, are on sale only through Friday night.

Annie is the story of a girl who lives in a New York City orphanage. She is chosen to spend the Christmas holidays at the home of wealthy tycoon Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks. He takes a liking to her, and joins in her search for her long-lost parents who promised to return to her one day. Based on the comic strip Little Orphan Annie, the action takes place in 1933 during the Depression. In such a trying setting, Annie displays a gusty charm fueled by a spirit of optimism and joy. Musical numbers such as It’s a Hard-knock Life, Easy Street, Maybe and Tomorrow highlight the show. Taking the challenge of the lead roles are Christen Etchart of Glasgow as Annie, Christopher Kristant as Warbucks, Megan Parker of Malta as Grace, his secretary, and Christina Pastor as Miss Hannigan. In all, the professional company includes seven actors and an eight-person production team. Completing the roster are actors from Glasgow, Wolf Point and Fort Peck. Mary Strand of Havre and Fort Peck chairs the Summer Theatre Board of Directors.

The acting company includes the following Glasgow residents who portray orphans: Tess Fahlgren, Marie Fahlgren, Taylor Markle, Cara Morehouse, Alexa Etchart and Katie Truscott. Additional orphans are: Becky Rogenes, Jenni Wagenhals, Kelly Hagfeldt, Kyra Flatow, Sable Sampson, and Sarah Grobel of Glasgow; Alison Dahl and Cassidy Dahl of Fort Peck; and Cassie Toavs, Lindsay Iwen and Andrea Jo Sarsaver of Wolf Point.

The following people play Hooverville residents, act as servants, or sing in the chorus: Nick Grobel, Luke Hystad, Jeff Irving, Cole McCloy, Jayson Evenson, Sam Helland, Kyle Boyer, Amelia Clampitt, Debra Ann Berger, Michelle Rohde, Dr. Robin O’Neil, Anna Fahlgren, Judy Evenson, Debra Irving, Jim Smrcka and Bill Bell, all of Glasgow; Veronica Black, Nathan Black and Sue Dahl of Fort Peck; and Janielle Derden of Wolf Point.

Along with those already listed, members of the professional company are Mark Chenovick, Philip Pace, Carly Booth and Ryan Grigg. The production team includes Stage Manager Aaron Torgerson, Scenic Designer Brian Harms, Technical Director Theresa Jenson, Costume Designer Elise Packee, Musical Director Greg Bolin, Assistant Stage Manager Shawn Newton, and Choreographer Brittiny Hollow.

This summer marks the 31st season of live performances at the Fort Peck Theatre. This historic building opened 1934 as a movie theatre and saw its greatest use during construction of the Fort Peck Dam. In 1970, its new life began as a home to theatre. While acoustics have not been ideal, improvements have been made over the years. This year, velvet draperies were installed on the walls to stop the sound from bouncing between surfaces, and body microphones were purchased for performers with speaking parts. Work on installation of a new roof begins this month.

The Fort Peck Fine Arts Council, Inc., a non-profit arts organization, presents the season. The summer’s agenda is full. It includes a one-week performing arts camp for youth in grade kindergarten through 12. It begins June 19 in Glasgow and concludes with a performance at the Fort Peck Theatre on June 24. A highlight of the summer will be the guest appearance of the Dirty Shame Dancers from Scobey on June 25. They will appear at 7 p.m. before the evening’s performance of Annie, and there will be no additional charge. Grease plays from July 14 to Aug. 6 and Oklahoma! plays from Aug. 11 through Sept. 3.

For more information on any of the summer’s activities, contact the Council in Glasgow at 406-228-9219.


FSA TO OFFER FACILITY LOANS (6/13)

The Farm Service Agency (FSA) is implementing a program to provide seven-year financing for on-farm storage of crops. Eligible storage structures and handling/drying equipment include bins or conventional type cribs, flat storage, oxygen limiting and other upright silo type structures; permanently affixed grain handling/drying equipment; safety equipment such as lighting and inside/outside ladders; cleaners/moisture testers/heat detectors; electrical equipment, such as motors/lighting/wiring; concrete foundations/pads (including site preparation, off-farm labor and materials); and remodeling of existing storage facilities as long as storage capacity is increased.
Some of the producer eligibility requirements are satisfactory credit rating, no delinquent Federal Debt, need for storage and ability to repay the debt. You must also be a producer of commodities. Loans are secured by a promissory note and security agreement covering the storage facility. A lien on the real estate on which the farm storage facility is located will be required on all loans in the form of a real estate mortgage, deed of trust, or other security instrument approved by Commodity Credit Corporation. The County Committee will review an assessment (via balance sheet and cash flow statement) of the producer’s ability to make the 25% down payment and first annual installment.

Federal environmental laws also required FSA to consider the impact of site preparation and the construction of farm storage facilities on the environment. All insurable crops within the farming unit are also required to have crop insurance (multi-peril, CAT or hail) for the life of the farm storage loan. The borrower pays all closing costs associated with the loan. A $45 non-refundable application fee is also assessed. Borrowers are limited to obtaining one loan per fiscal year. The principal amount of the loan shall be 75% of the net cost of the applicant’s needed storage or handling equipment, not to exceed $100,000. The aggregate outstanding balance of all facility loans shall not exceed $100,000 per borrower. The interest rate charged will be similar to the rate charged on comparable Treasury securities in effect during the month the loan is approved, currently 6.625%. The rate remains in effect for the term of the loan.

Also, producers who bought or built storage facilities between February 2, 2000 and May 30, 2000 may apply for a loan and may be approved if they meet eligibility and loan security requirements. After May 30th, producers must have loan approval before beginning any work, including ordering bins, accepting delivery of facility parts, beginning site preparation, beginning foundation construction, or beginning upgrading existing facilities.

Interested producers may contact the Valley County Farm Service Agency.
MONTANA HOPE PROJECT FUNDRAISER (6/13)

You're all invited to Lewistown, Sunday, July 2 beginning at 11 a.m. for the Big Spring Bluegrass Festival. Featured bands are Front Range, Deep River, Open Road and Homestyle BlueGrass. A flatpicking workshop, arts and crafts fair and plenty of food vendors will round out the day's activities at the Central Montana Fairgrounds. All festival proceeds go to the Montana Hope Project to grant wishes for chronically-ill Montana kids. Call 538-HOPE for tickets.


COMMUNITY BLOCK GRANTS INCLUDE VALLEY COUNTY (6/12)

Montana Department of Commerce has approved 19 applications for $241,205 in funds from the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. The Department of Commerce received 25 applications requesting a total of $294,105.

The CDBG program provides matching grants to local governments for planning, research, or technical design activities. The grant ceiling per applicant is $15,000, an increase of $5,000 over 1999.

"Each year the need out paces the dollars we have to distribute to our communities who face growing infrastructure demands, increasing project costs and shrinking local budgets," said Peter Blouke, Director, Montana Department of Commerce. "This money, although modest in individual dollars, is essential to each of these communities in addressing the well-being of their residents."

The successful applicants are:

* Anaconda-Deer Lodge County will receive $9,705 for the completion of a Capital Improvements Plan.

* Carbon County will receive $15,000 to update and complete the County's Master Plan/Growth Policy.

* The City of Colstrip will receive $10,000 to be used for the development of a Comprehensive Growth Policy that conforms to the requirements of Senate Bill 97.

* The Town of Ekalaka will receive $15,000 for the development of a Capital Improvements Plan.

* The City of Helena will receive $15,000 to create plans for two developing areas of the eastern fringe of Helena and to reassess city policies regarding infrastructure requirements for fringe area development.

* Judith Basin County, which sponsored an application for Raynesford, will receive $15,000 for a Wastewater Treatment and Disposal Engineering Study.

* Lewis & Clark County will receive $15,000 for the development of a Wastewater Management Strategy for the Helena Valley and will perform an inventory of individual on-site septic systems and domestic wells.

* The City of Lewistown will receive $15,000 for the development of a Comprehensive Plan/Growth Policy for the city of Lewistown and the surrounding 4.5-mile planning area, to provide guidance for land use, public investment decisions, and downtown revitalization.

* The City of Livingston will receive $15,000 for the creation of a Livingston Urban Design and Integrated Capital Improvements Plan.

* Madison County will receive $10,000 to develop and adopt a countywide Capital Improvements Plan and to revise the Madison County comprehensive plan to meet the growth policy standards outlined in Senate Bill 97 of the 1997 Montana Legislature.

* Park County, which sponsored an application for Cooke City, will receive $15,000 for a Water System Analysis and Engineering Study and other planning efforts that will help the Park County-Cooke City Water District address serious deficiencies in their water system.

* The City of Polson will receive $15,000 for Preliminary Engineering costs associated with the development of the Polson west shore water system.

* Rosebud County, which sponsored an application for the Ashland Water and Sewer District, will receive $8,000 for the development of a Capital Improvements Plan and to address the impact of the proposed Tongue River Railroad construction.

* The Town of Stevensville will receive $10,000 for the preparation of the town's first Comprehensive Plan, as a response to the community's rapid population growth.

* Teton County will receive $15,000 for the development of a County Growth Policy that will meet the new requirements set out by Senate Bill 97 in the 1999 Legislature.

* The Town of Twin Bridges will receive $12,000 for the completion of a new Growth Policy that will meet the new requirements of Senate Bill 97.

* Valley County, which sponsored an application for Hinsdale, will receive $6,500 for the development of a Capital Improvements Plan for the new Hinsdale Water and Sewer District.

* The Town of Virginia City will receive $10,000 for the development of a town Growth Policy and Comprehensive Plan and for an update of the Design Review Ordinance.

* Yellowstone County, which sponsored an application for Lockwood, will receive $15,000 for an update of the Preliminary Engineering Plan and for preparation of funding applications for the proposed Phase I and Phase II
of the Lockwood Water and Sewer District wastewater system.

The Planning Grants play an important role in the operation of the Department's public facilities and housing programs. In most cases the proposed study or plan is the first step leading to subsequent submittal of a full funding application to the Department of Commerce's CDBG Program, Treasure State Endowment Program, or HOME (Home Investment Partnerships) program.

The CDBG grants can be used for a variety of planning activities, including initial planning necessary to get a project underway or preparing a neighborhood redevelopment plan, a housing study, capital improvement plan, or similar planning processes needed to help a community address critical housing and/or public facilities needs.


TEARING DOWN OLD ELEVATOR (6/11)

Crews were busy this week, starting the process of tearing down the old grain elevator located near R & G Quality Feeds.


JODY'S CONOCO UNDERGOES UPGRADE (6/11)
Jody's Conoco is replacing the old gas pumps with new 24 hour credit card pumps, and replacing the underground tanks. The convenience store is open throughout the construction and the gas station should be open within a few days.

MONTANA PSC TO CO-HOST FEDERAL-STATE CONFERENCE ON ADVANCED TELECOM SERVICES (6/11)

The deployment of advanced telecommunications services in Montana will be the focus of panel discussions hosted by the Montana Public Service Commission beginning at 1 p.m. on June 21 at Culbertson Hall on the campus of Montana State University-Bozeman. Interested persons may also participate at one of the following four interactive videoconference sites that will broadcast the event:

- Glasgow, at the Nemont Telephone Cooperative office;
- Billings, at MSU-Billings;
- Pablo, at Salish-Kootenai Tribal College; and
- Cheyenne, Wyoming, at the Little America Hotel.

In addition to the interactive videoconference, the conference will be web-streamed at www.montanavision.net\video\fcc.ram.

Representatives of state government, small rural telephone companies, and Montana communities will address the efforts and challenges of advanced services deployment during the panel discussions. An open forum to hear public comments will follow.

The public is invited to attend the event, which is being held in conjunction with the Mountain West region field hearing of the Federal-State Joint Conference on Advanced Telecommunications Services scheduled for June 23 in Cheyenne, Wyoming. The federal-state joint conference was established by the FCC at the suggestion of Montana PSC Commissioner Bob Rowe as part of that agency's efforts to ensure that advanced telecommunications services are deployed as rapidly as possible to all Americans. It consists of the five FCC commissioners and five state public service commissioners from around the country. Rowe is a non-voting member of the joint conference.

The purpose of the events in Montana and Wyoming is to assist the joint conference in gathering information about deployment of broadband technology in this region. The speakers will share practical information on what works, what does not work, and what policy makers should do to help bring broadband services to all citizens.
"It is very important to Montana's citizens and economy that advanced services such as high-speed Internet access and other broadband technologies be available throughout the state," according to PSC chairman Dave Fisher. "The Bozeman forum will give interested Montanans the opportunity to learn about these advanced services and to provide their comments on the subject."

The Wyoming field hearing will be co-hosted by the Wyoming, Montana and South Dakota public service commissions. Montana PSC member Rowe will be co-chair of the hearing, along with FCC Commissioner Harold Furchtgott-Roth and Wyoming PSC member Steve Furtney.

Registration packets that include complete program details and a conference agenda that includes both the Montana and Wyoming events are available from the Montana PSC by calling 406-444-6199. Registration is free. Persons wanting to participate may also register over the Internet at the Wyoming PSC's web site at psc.state.wy.us/.


TORNADO TOUCHES DOWN IN NORTHEAST MONTANA (6/8)
A tornado touched down in northeastern Montana Wednesday night. It stirred up dust and debris, but there were no reports of damage to homes or other structures.

The National Weather Service says radar first detected the tornado 12 miles west of Landusky. From there it moved east at about 40 miles per hour. There were confirmed sightings at Fourchette Bay on Fort Peck Lake, and in southwestern Valley County. One tornado was reported at Sun Prairie, and at about 9:25pm, a tornado was reported at the Burke Ranch southwest of Glasgow. Meteorologist Kim Bailey, in Glasgow, says the tornado touched down repeatedly, but it is not known how many times. No injuries or structural damage was reported. Also, in Hinsdale 1.75 inch hail occurred last night. Zortman received 1 inch hail and wind gusts at 76mph 18 miles south of Zortman.

Bailey says Montana has averaged 14 tornadoes a year since 1995. Peak tornado season in northeastern Montana runs from now until mid-July. (Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
UNEMPLOYMENT RATES, APRIL, 2000 (6/7)
COUNTY
Unemployment Rate, April 2000
April 1999
Valley
3.7%
4.0%
Sheridan
5.6%
5.8%
Roosevelt
9.9%
8.2%
Richland
8.3%
7.7%
Phillips
5.4%
6.9%
McCone
3.8%
3.9%


BILL WOULD CURB FEDERAL LAND GRABS (6/7)

Montana Senator Conrad Burns today announced that the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, of which he is a member, passed the National Monument Participation Act of 1999, which would establish a clear role for Congress and the public in the process of declaring national monuments on federal lands.

"This bill, while it will benefit the whole nation, really hits home in Montana, where the administration has a history of trying to undermine public input and Congress in establishing monuments," Burns said. "I'm happy that Secretary Babbitt has agreed to sit down and discuss the future of the Upper Missouri, but it sure took a lot of blood, sweat and tears to get the administration's ear. We need to legally bind the president to a process that gets everyone involved in order to assure fair, democratic decisions in the future."

The National Monument Participation Act, or S. 729, requires that the administration undertake a full environmental impact statement before any land can be designated as a monument. In doing so, the bill mandates that any monument designation be opened for public comment to ensure the local, state, and federal governments and general public are informed and involved. Additionally, the bill requires the Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture to perform an assessment of current uses of the land proposed for designation.

Burns said that this bill "has more teeth" than a similar bill being considered in the House of Representatives. "Unlike the House bill, this bill would require the administration to get public and Congressional input right from the beginning," Burns said. "The House bill allows the administration make top-down decisions, and only steps in after the fact to give the public limited say over how a monument is managed."

Many people have criticized the Clinton-Gore administration for abusing the current monuments process in areas that are vital to the economic well-being of local residents and over areas far larger than preservation needs dictate. Burns pointed to President Clinton's establishment of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah as such an abuse of power. As the president's term draws to a close, he has stepped up his aggressive campaign of monument designations.

Senator Larry Craig (R-Idaho) is the lead sponsor of the bill. Burns and 15 of his Senate colleagues are cosponsoring the bill.


GREASE TRYOUTS SET FOR THIS WEEKEND (6/7)
Auditions are scheduled this weekend for the Fort Peck Theatre’s presentation of Grease, announces Artistic Director Bobby Gutierrez. Auditions begin at 1 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday afternoons. They will be held at the Theatre in Fort Peck. Grease plays Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings, opening July 14 and closing Aug. 6.

Parts to be cast this weekend are Miss Lynch, the school official, Patty, Eugene, Jan, Sonny, Vince, Johnny and Cha Cha. Performers should come prepared to sing 12 to 16 bars of any song, and present a memorized passage that is one to two minutes in length, Gutierrez said.

Upcoming on the Theatre agenda are tryouts for Oklahoma, which are scheduled Monday, June 26, at 6 p.m. at the Theatre in Fort Peck.

For more information on tryouts, contact the Fort Peck Fine Arts Council at 406-228-9219, or 406-526-9943.

RESULTS FOR THE JUNE 6TH PRIMARY ELECTION

Valley County Primary Election:

CANDIDATES:

Democrats:

PRESIDENT AL GORE 648 / 75.08%
U.S. SENATOR JOHN DRISCOLL 229 / 25.99%
U.S. SENATOR BRIAN SCHWEITZER 652 / 74.00%
U.S. REPRESENTATIVE NANCY KEENAN 883 / 100.00%
GOVERNOR/LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR MIKE COONEY/DIANA WYATT 154 / 16.04%
GOVERNOR/LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR JOSEPH MAZUREK/DOROTHY BRADLEY 329 / 34.27%
GOVERNOR/LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR MARK O'KEEFE/CAROL WILLIAMS 477 / 49.68%
SECRETARY OF STATE HAL HARPER 485 / 64.75%
SECRETARY OF STATE PAUL TUSS 264 / 35.24%
ATTORNEY GENERAL STEVE BULLOCK 195 / 23.15%
ATTORNEY GENERAL MIKE MCGRATH 647 / 76.84%
STATE AUDITOR DAVID EWER 177 / 21.87%
STATE AUDITOR JOHN MORRISON 531 / 65.63%
STATE AUDITOR BARRY "SPOOK" STANG 101 / 12.48%
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION GAIL GRAY 163 / 17.67%
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION LINDA MCCULLOCH 245 / 26.57%
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION MIKE SCHWINDEN 514 / 55.74%
CLERK OF SUPREME COURT ED SMITH 785 / 100.00%
STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 96 TODD WAGNER 508 / 100.00%
STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT 95 ART ARNOLD 282 / 100.00%
COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 MARLA J. MAXNESS-DEDOBBELEER 481 / 46.11%
COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 RON GILBERTSON 562 / 53.88%
CLERK OF DISTRICT COURT PATRICIA HILL 937 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 1 COMMITTEEWOMAN* IRENE RUYLE BAKER 118 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 3 COMMITTEEMAN* STAN OZARK 150 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 3 COMMITTEEWOMAN* VIRGINIA BORTAS 139 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 4 COMMITTEEMAN* ARTHUR K. BUEN 109 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 7 COMMITTEEMAN* MANSON BAILEY, JR. 195 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 8 COMMITTEEMAN* MARION HELLSTERN 62 / 100.00%

*Separate positions

Republicans:

PRESIDENT ALAN KEYES 217 / 14.58%
PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH 1193 / 80.17%
U.S. SENATOR CONRAD BURNS 1302 / 100.00%
U.S. REPRESENTATIVE DENNIS REHBERG 1250 / 100.00%
GOVERNOR/LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR ROB NATELSON/TOM KEATING 456 / 31.14%
GOVERNOR/LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR JUDY MARTZ/KARL OHS 1008 / 68.85%
SECRETARY OF STATE RUSS FILLNER 297 / 27.34%
SECRETARY OF STATE BOB BROWN 789 / 72.65%
ATTORNEY GENERAL JIM RICE 1136 / 100.00%
STATE AUDITOR BRUCE T. SIMON 476 / 45.55%
STATE AUDITOR JOYCE SCHMIDT 569 / 54.44%
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION ELAINE SOLLIE HERMAN 309 / 29.31%
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION BOB ANDERSON 275 / 26.09%
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION WAYNE BUCHANAN 269 / 25.52%
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION DENNIS JOHNSON 201 / 19.07%
STATE SENATOR DISTRICT #48 SAM KITZENBERG 1309 / 100.00%
STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT #96 LEE HUMBERT 139 / 16.72%
STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT #96 TIM THARP 120 / 14.44%
STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT #96 KARL A.WAITSCHIES 572 / 68.83%
STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT #95 JEFF PATTISON 378 / 62.37%
STATE REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICT #95 WAYNE STAHL 228 / 37.62%
COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 KARI LEE KNIERIM 751 / 50.98%
COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 3 JULIE BURKE 722 / 49.01%
PRECINCT 1 COMMITTEEMAN* CHARLES WILSON 219 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 1 COMMITTEEWOMAN* BECKY ERICKSON 222 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 2 COMMITTEEMAN* LLOYD T. EIDE 97 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 3 COMMITTEEMAN* JON BENGOCHEA 145 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 3 COMMITTEEWOMAN* ERIN GLENNIE 117 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 5 COMMITTEEMAN* JOHN D. HERRIN 111 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 5 COMMITTEEWOMAN* RACHEL C.HERRIN 107 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 7 COMMITTEEMAN* WILLIAM W. SILVER 215 / 100.00%
PRECINCT 7 COMMITTEEWOMAN* FLORENCE BURSHNICK 205 / 100.00%

*Separate positions

Reform Party:

U.S. SENATOR SAM RANKIN 20 / 100.00%
SECRETARY OF STATE J.R. MYERS 19 / 100.00%
SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION LARRY D. FOUST 19 / 100.00%

Non-partisan:

CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT KARLA M. GRAY 1123 / 51.44%
CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT TERRY N. TRIEWEILER 1060 / 48.55%
SUPREME COURT JUSTICE #3 FRANCIS P. "FRANK" MCGEE 312 / 15.26%
SUPREME COURT JUSTICE #3 JEFF RENZ 119 / 5.82%
SUPREME COURT JUSTICE #3 CHRIS TWEETEN 536 / 26.22%
SUPREME COURT JUSTICE #3 PATRICIA (PAT) COTTER 1077 / 52.69%
DISTRICT COURT #17 JOHN C. MCKEON 1958 / 100.00%

Special Election Primary Ballot:

An additional 10 mill levy of 10 mills per tax year for fiscal years 2000-2001 and 2001-2002 for construction of public highways and bridges. FOR: 667 / 51.74%
AGAINST: 622 / 48.25%

POLLING PLACES FOR THE JUNE 6TH PRIMARY ELECTION (6/6)

Polling places are open 7am-8pm, except for the Lustre Grade School Polling Place 10, which is open from noon-8pm. We'll have full results on the air and on the web tonight and Wednesday, from our longtime election coverage sponsor, Town & Country Furniture.

POLLING PLACE
PRECINCT
ACTIVE VOTERS
HOUSE DISTRICT
Glasgow Civic Center 1 876 96
Courthouse Courtroom 2 601 96
Glasgow Civic Center 3 788 96
Nashua School Library 4 417 96
Frazer Community Hall 5 327 96
Lustre Grade School (PP 10) 5 185 96
Courthouse Community Room 6 285 96
Courthouse Lobby 7 1038 95
Fort Peck Rec Hall (PP 11) 7 328 95
Hinsdale Legion Hall 8 361 95
Opheim Northern Electric Building 9 374 95

TEACHERS GET RAISE AT SPECIAL SCHOOL BOARD SESSION (6/2)
The Glasgow School Board met in special session on Friday to make a decision on what to do with an extra $120,528 in state funding that was approved by the special session of the Montana legislature last month.

Glasgow school superintendent Glenn Monson informed the board that the Glasgow school district received an increase of 2.88 percent in state funding. He said that Glasgow was fortunate because almost all other school received less of an increase. House bill #4, which was approved by the Montana legislature also, reduced county taxes by $63,024 or 4.22 percent. So not only does the Glasgow school district receive badly needed cash the taxpayers in Valley County also get a reduction in their taxes.

The school board decided to use a portion of this available funding and increase the salaries for school district employees. The board took up the Glasgow certified staff which includes all Glasgow teachers. Currently the salaries for Glasgow teachers take up $2,050,343 or nearly 50 percent of the budget. Superintendent Glenn Monson proposed raising the current base salary to $19,850 which would cost the school district $66,079 for the next fiscal year. This would move the total teacher salary cost next year to $2,117,052. According to the salary schedule currently used by the district and the teachers union this would mean a raise of 3.9 percent for those teachers with the most experience and education and a raise of 2 percent for the teachers with the least amount of experience. The average raise for Glasgow teachers amounts to 3.25 percent.

The board also took up the matter of raises for school principals and the school clerk and they approved raises of 3.9 percent for those employees. Negotiations are currently taking place for the districts classified employees and the board is looking at raising the salaries of the employees who are involved in extra-curricular activities. Those issues will be brought up later. School superintendent Monson told the board that in his 35 years of education he can't remember a school board giving pay raises to employees in the middle of a contract and he praised them for rewarding the employees of the school district.
BURNS CALLS FOR MORE DROUGHT RELEIF (6/1)

Montana Senator Conrad Burns has called on Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman to provide Montana agriculture producers additional drought relief by helping them improve their wells and access to additional grazing lands.

"The drought is going to hit parts of Montana hard, and we need to make sure that the safety net for our producers is up to snuff," Burns said. "Right now it isn't, but Secretary Glickman has the power to change that. I am asking him to take the necessary steps to ensure Montana producers will still be around next year."

Burns said that the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) should play a bigger role in offering drought relief to producers. The CRP is a program that protects highly erodable or environmentally sensitive lands. In counties where CRP lands have been opened for grazing, producers who allow grazing on their CRP lands receive smaller payments for acreage they have enrolled in the program.

In a letter to Glickman, Burns thanked him for increasing the diminished rental payments on CRP lands that have been opened for grazing, a measure that Burns requested earlier. He added, however, that much more needed to be done. Burns called on Glickman to reevaluate the process used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in determining drought status, which is done on a by-county basis.

Burns said that many counties in Montana are so large that a few scattered monitoring stations may not accurately reflect the amount of precipitation different parts of the county receive. He hoped that changing the process could open CRP land for grazing in more Montana counties than the seven where grazing is currently permitted. Burns also asked Glickman to revise the rules for the Environmental Conservation Program (ECP), which helps producers to improve needed wells.

Due to the lack of precipitation over the last three years, many existing wells are no longer deep enough to reach diminishing groundwater.

Under the current rules, ECP relief is granted based on current moisture levels, but groundwater levels have been steadily declining for years and will not be back to full strength for some time. Burns believes that subsurface moisture levels must be taken into account.


FORMER BIA ENGINEER ADMITS THEFT (6/1)

(Great Falls-AP) -- A former civil engineer with the Bureau of Indian Affairs at Fort Peck, has admitted bilking the government out of nearly eight-thousand dollars in credit card charges.

Forty-seven-year-old Leroy Headdress pleaded guilty in Great Falls. He admitted using a government MasterCard, for just under eight-thousand-dollars in cash and merchandise. Headdress said he knew he would not be able to pay off the balance.

He could get up to five years in prison, when federal Judge Donald Molloy sentences him September 27th.

In April, B-I-A officials acknowledged the agency has a "department-wide problem" with employees misusing government credit cards and failing to pay the bills. Thirteen employees in Montana and Wyoming were disciplined. (Copyright 2000, Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


CMR FIRE PICTURES (6/1)

Here are a few pictures from the Long Run Fire Department of last weekend's CMR fire.(Click the small pictures for a larger image.)

The yellow Pines Truck and red Long Run truck #11 at Harper's Ridge Long Run Firefighters with portable water tank, looking south in Harper's Ridge area.
Looking east on Harper's Ridge Harper's Ridge, looking south. The country was so rough the firefighters had to walk in and put the fire out with shovels and rakes.


 The 2nd Annual VFW Picnic (6/24)
            The 2nd Annual VFW Picnic was held Saturday, June 24th in Kiwanis Park .  The Veterans of the Korean War were honored this year.  There  were displays by the U.S. Air Force and Montana National Guard, door prizes donated by local businesses, horseshoes, a live band, & a preview by the Ft. Peck Summer Theatre actors.  


 


Fort Peck Wildlife Exhibition Pasture and Water Safety Seminar (Click on small pictures for larger view)
Buffalo & calf
Fox kits.
Foxy part 2
Mark Calamar & a bucket of fun.
Water Safety classes conducted by Park Rangers Mark Calamar and Cowboy Murch. Topics discussed included hypothermia, water safety, water rescue, and the proper use of personal flotation devices (PFD). They also rode in electric mini boats, which as you can see, even the adults enjoyed.

Royal W. Moray

Royal W. Moray, 51, of Billings, was born to Henry and Florence Paus Morey Aug. 18, 1948, in Glasgow. He died Sunday, June 18, 2000, at his home in Billings. Cremation has taken place. Memorial will be 2 p.m. Friday, June 23, at First Lutheran Church in Opheim and memorial in Billings at 3 p.m. Thursday, June 29, at Peace Lutheran Church. Arrangements were made by Cremation or Funeral Gallery.

He graduated from Opheim High School in 1966 and was employed by Farmers Union and Westland Oil in Opheim.

He went to Billings Automotive and obtained a service job in Great Falls. After graduating from a parts school in Great Falls, he worked for Valley Motors in Glasgow and later at Michels Parts Store in Buffalo, Wyo. In 1989, he moved back to Billings and attended Denver Business College, graduating in 1991. He was then employed by Sysco until time of death.

Royal was an avid fisherman, enjoyed bowling and loved his family, especially his six nieces.

He is survived by his mother, Florence of Opheim; two brothers, Dale (Micki) of Culbertson, and Michael (Patricia) of Waldorf, Md. He was preceded in death by his father, Henry and brother, James.


Hans Boyum

Hans Boyum of Circle, 87, died June 9th at his home. Memorial services will be Tuesday, June 13th at 2pm at the First Lutheran Church in Circle. Internment will be at the Riverview Cemetery in Circle with Pastor Neva Rathbyn officiating. Clayton Memorial Chapel in charge of arrangements.

Hans was born on the homestead, miles outside of Circle in 1913 to Knute & Gurden Boyum. He lived in the Circle area all his life. He worked on various ranches around Circle and was a member of the First Lutheran Church in Circle. He loved hunting for rocks and arrowheads.

Survivors include 1 sister, Hannah Mackenstadt of Bremerton, Washington, and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, 4 brothers and 2 sisters.