AUGUST OBITUARIES

OPHEIM NATIVE NAMED MSU-NORTHERN CHANCELLOR (8/31)

INDIAN CASINOS NOT BENEFITING NATIVE AMERICANS (8/31)

AREA RANCHES CLOSE TO HUNTING & TRAVEL DUE TO FIRE RESTRICTIONS

BIG BURGER TURNS INTO BIG SQUABBLE (8/31)

LEVEL IV FIRE RESTRICTIONS FOR VALLEY COUNTY (8/30)

FWP CONCERNED ABOUT OVERCROWDED HUNTING (8/30)

MONTANA SCHOOLS NEED HIGHER TEACHER PAY (8/30)

SACO FUN DAYS SET FOR LABOR DAY WEEKEND (8/26)

TOURISM STUDY TO BEGIN IN SEPTEMBER (8/26)

GLASGOW AGRICULTURE PRODUCER, LYNN CORNWELL, DRIVES BILL TO WHITE HOUSE IN TRACTOR (8/26)

GUARDSMEN BACK IN TOWN ON THURSDAY (8/24)

BRANDT NAMED TO ECONOMIC TASK FORCE (8/23)

FSA ANNOUNCES 48 HOUR NOTIFICATION AMS (8/23)

LONG RUN PUTS OUT 2 MORE FIRES (8/22)

DODSON MAN IDENTIFIED (8/22)

FORT PECK TOURISM UP (8/21)

DODSON MAN AMONG WEEKEND'S FATALITIES (8/21)

MANG WANTS TO LEASE SITE AS BOMB TEST RANGE (8/21)

INDIAN GAMING ASSOCIATION MEETS (8/19)

THREE FATALITIES ALONG HI-LINE (8/19)

LEVEL III FIRE RESTRICTIONS FOR MOST OF MONTANA (8/18)

REUNION A SUCCESS BUT FUNDING COMES UP SHORT (8/18)

GLASGOW-MALTA NATIONAL GUARD UNIT MOVES ON TO NEXT FIRE (8/17)

MONTANA ANNOUNCES TOLL-FREE NUMBER FOR FIRE RECOVERY DONATIONS (8/17)

GOVERNOR DECLARES MONTANA IN STATE OF DISASTER (8/17)

PAIR SENTENCED IN BURGLARIES (8/17)

HAY FIRE SOUTH OF GLASGOW (8/17)

WORLD'S LARGEST BURGER MAKES IT INTO GUINNESS BOOK (8/16)

RAIL LINE ALONG HI-LINE REOPENED (8/16)

EIGHT HUNDRED ACRE FIRE ON CMR IS OUT (8/16)

AUTHORITIES INVESTIGATING MALTA DERAILMENT (8/15)

LATEST ON AREA FIRES (8/15)

MAJORITY OF TEENS IN ACCIDENT SENT HOME (8/15)

HIGHWAY 2 RE-OPENED (8/15)

HIGHWAY 2 CLOSED, PART OF MALTA EVACUATED IN DERAILMENT (8/15)

GLASGOW NATIONAL GUARD UNIT ASSIGNED SOUTHWEST OF HELENA (8/14)

DOWNED POWER LINE DEEMED CAUSE OF GOLF COURSE FIRE (8/14)

15 CHURCH YOUTH INJURED IN 3-CAR COLLISION (8/14)

TEEN DIES FROM AUTO ACCIDENT INJURIES (8/14)

POPLAR MAN JAILED ON DRUG CHARGES (8/13)

FIRES HIT VALLEY COUNTY

LATEST MONTANA FIRE NEWS

CRAZY DAYS HITS GLASGOW THIS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

TWO VALLEY COUNTY RESIDENTS PLEAD GUILTY IN ELK CASE (8/10)

GLASGOW NATIONAL GUARD UNIT TO LEAVE FRIDAY FOR FIRE TRAINING (8/10)

CHAMBER INVITES ALL GROUPS TO PARTICIPATE IN HIGHLAND GAMES

NATURAL GAS PRICES AT HISTORIC HIGHS AND MAY GO HIGHER, MDU SAYS

MONTANA FOREST FIRE UPDATES

FOREST FIRE AIR QUALITY INFORMATION AVAILABLE ON-LINE FROM MONTANA DEQ

GLASGOW UNIT OF NATIONAL GUARD ACTIVATED TO FIGHT FIRES

LONG RUN RESPONDS TO HAY FIELD FIRE

OKLAHOMA! COMES TO FORT PECK SUMMER THEATRE (8/7)

RON SEELHOFF WINS FORT PECK PWT (8/7)


OPHEIM NATIVE NAMED MSU-NORTHERN CHANCELLOR (8/31)
Alex Capdeville Accepts the Position as Chancellor of MSU-Northern
Dr. Terry Roark interim president of Montana State University announced today that Dr. Alex Capdeville, CEO of Helena College of Technology, has accepted the position as Chancellor of MSU-Northern for a two-year fixed term. This acceptance is pending the Board of Regents approval during the Butte meeting at the end of September.

This decision came after Dr. Capdeville visited the campus of MSU-Northern on Wednesday, August 30 and met with members of the administration, faculty, staff, student body and community. During his visit, Dr. Capdeville said that increasing enrollment would be his number one issue. "I believe that this goal can be achieved by making articulation agreements with other institutions especially Canadian schools and improving residence hall facilities and student life. Achieving NCATE accreditation will also be critical to Northern's ongoing success and growth." Alex explained that a great deal of the success that they have experienced in recruiting has come from involvement from the faculty.

Dr. Roark explained that "We believe that Alex will be a good fit for MSU-Northern because he understands Northern's unique mix of four-year technical, education and nursing programs in addition he understands the needs of Higher Education in Montana. Alex also has a good reputation of working closely with faculty, students and industry to make sure that their programs are meeting the needs of employers."

Alex has been CEO of the Helena College of Technology and its four facilities throughout Helena since 1978. Under his leadership, the institution has realized a growth in enrollment of 53% since 1995. He has also served for six years on the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. "My experience on the commission has given me great insights about the accreditation issues that face MSU-Northern in general and its engineering, nursing and educational programs in particular."

Alex was born and reared in Opheim, Montana. Alex is an alumnus of MSU-Northern, where he earned his bachelor's and master's degree. He holds a doctorate from Colorado State University.

Alex will be moving to Havre to start as Chancellor around September 15.


INDIAN CASINOS NOT BENEFITING NATIVE AMERICANS (8/31)
(Washington-AP) -- Most American Indians are apparently not benefiting from gambling revenues from Indian casinos.

Analysis of federal unemployment, poverty and welfare records indicates Indian casinos have led to only scattered success, in improving quality of life on reservations. Indian gaming generates revenues of more than eight (b) billion dollars a year, but two-thirds of Indians belong to tribes that don't have casinos.

In 1998, of more than 150 tribes with casinos, fewer than two dozen tribes accounted for more than half of the total revenue. A few casinos near major cities have thrived. Most of the others, according to the A-P analysis, make just enough to cover the bills (Copyright 2000 Associated Press. All rights reserved.)


AREA RANCHES CLOSE TO HUNTING DUE TO FIRE DANGER (8/31)
Due to extreme fire danger all hunting & off road travel is closed on the following ranches until further notice: Borderview Ranch, Bill & Todd Westby Ranch, Bill Omvig Ranch, Virgil Nelson Ranch, Don Davenport Ranch, and land owned by Pankratz Farms and Pankratz Brothers. (Ed. note: we'll continue to update this list daily as we receive more closures.)
BIG BURGER TURNS INTO BIG SQUABBLE (8/31)
(Malta-AP) -- The people who organized the cooking of the world's largest hamburger are deeply divided, in a squabble over money.

The Sleeping Buffalo Resort near Saco, where the three-ton burger was prepared, is suing Hi-Line Promotions, the non-profit group in Malta that organized the event. The resort says Hi-Line has yet to repay 46-hundred dollars in costs, from the event on Labor Day last year.

Hi-Line Promotions is counter-suing Sleeping Buffalo, claiming the resort owes the group 12-thousand dollars in proceeds from pop and beer sales, that were never turned over.

The Guinness Book of Records recently certified the six-thousand-40-pound hamburger as the largest ever cooked. (Copyright 2000 Associated Press. All rights reserved.)


LEVEL IV FIRE RESTRICTIONS FOR VALLEY COUNTY (8/30)
Look for the counties of Eastern Montana to go to level IV fire restrictions Wednesday morning. These new fire restrictions would affect campfires primarily. Among the restrictions expected to go into effect are bans on campfires, charcoal fires and stove fires, restriction on smoking outside of vehicles and buildings and better defining the ban on off-road use. These restrictions affect all land managed by the state of Montana. Level IV fire restrictions are one step away from complete closure.

Meanwhile officials of the CMR National Wildlife Refuge announced Monday that it¹s lands would go to Level IV restrictions effective midnight Monday.

With the first scheduled hunting seasons to begin this weekend the fire restriction order will limit hunters travel and activities on the refuge. All roads on the refuge are numbered. Motorized travel will only be allowed on roads numbered in the 100s, 200s and selected other roads. All other numbered roads will remain closed until further notice.

The CMR also won't allow fires, campfires or charcoal grills, though stoves using gas or fuel will be allowed at developed recreation sites. Camping will be allowed only immediately next to open roads-not the 100-yards off roads that had been allowed.

Smoking will be allowed only in an enclosed vehicle, building or developed recreation site. Finally, travel on foot or bicycle will be allowed on numbered CMR roads that have been closed due to the extreme fire danger.


FWP CONCERNED ABOUT OVERCROWDED HUNTING (8/30)
(Helena-AP) -- With almost half the state already closed to hunting and other recreation due to rampaging wildfires, the state's fish and game chief is concerned sportsmen will flood into eastern Montana when the seasons open.

Fish and Game Director Pat Graham yesterday urged hunters barred from their preferred areas of western Montana to be patient, and stay home until fire conditions improve.

He says landowners in eastern Montana are especially concerned about the impacts an influx of hunters could have in areas of high fire danger. Graham says this is a time for patience, restraint and compassion, and all hunters -- especially those in western Montana -- should consider rescheduling early season hunting plans, until the state's dry conditions and fire danger subsides.

His advice came on the heels of a decision by state and federal officials to tighten use restrictions on millions of acres of public and private land in 29 eastern Montana counties, effective Wednesday. (Copyright 2000 Associated Press. All rights reserved.)


MONTANA SCHOOLS NEED HIGHER TEACHER PAY (8/30)
(Helena-AP) A national report suggests Montana's rural schools are among those with the most urgent need for higher teacher pay, increased Internet access and better-trained faculty.

The study by the Rural School and Community Trust found Montana is one of ten states where rural education is most important, and the need for policy changes the greatest. The report says pay for Montana's rural teachers is the fifth lowest in the nation, an average of almost five-thousand dollars less than what teachers make elsewhere in the state.

The study also found almost 44 percent of rural teachers are instructing in subjects outside their field of training -- the fourth worst ranking in the country.

(Copyright 2000 Associated Press. All rights reserved.)
SACO FUN DAYS SET FOR LABOR DAY WEEKEND (8/26)

(Billings Gazette)

The 37th annual Saco Fun Day Celebration starts at 6 p.m. Friday with a potluck and pork barbecue. At 9 p.m., is the “Elvis is Alive” event at OB’s Bar or DJ music at Jakes.

On Saturday, the Quilt and Craft Show opens at the IOOF Hall at 9 a.m. The petting zoo also opens at 9 a.m. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., there are ferris wheel rides. The parade will be at 11 a.m. before the free beef barbecue from noon to 1 p.m. Between 1 and 3 p.m., kids and adults may play games on Front Street. The pie and coffee social is at the Methodist Church and there is bingo at the Senior Citizens Center. The demolition derby is at 3 p.m. before Human Darts for all ages at 5 p.m. Music and karaoke start at 9 p.m. and the Fire/EMS breakfast is at 11 p.m.

The celebration ends with a horseshoes tournament at 2 p.m. on Monday, September 3rd. For more information, contact the Saco Chamber of Commerce at (406) 527-3218.


TOURISM STUDY TO BEGIN IN SEPTEMBER (8/26)
(Billings Gazette) Miles City, the Fort Peck Reservation and Pondera County will participate in an eight-month process to help determine if tourism can diversify and expand area economies.

The process begins in September with a detailed program introduction and community organization.

Included are a comprehensive analysis of the community’s current economic structure, its assets, resident attitudes toward tourism, area lifestyles, marketing and the community’s existing and potential tourism resources.

After the initial analysis, the community and its partners identify potential tourism products for development. Then they determine the social, economic and environmental effects that are expected to result from the product’s development.

Once the analysis and assessments are completed, the community determines what tourism-related projects, if any, should be pursued.

The tourism-assessment program is provided to the communities through the Montana Commerce Department’s Travel Montana program, Montana State University Extension and the University of Montana’s Institute for Tourism and Recreation Research.

The Montana Community Tourism Assessment Program is a self-help program developed to assist rural communities to identify what role tourism can play in strengthening local economies. Travel Montana and MSU Extension provide the process facilitators, while UM helps with research.


GLASGOW AGRICULTURE PRODUCER, LYNN CORNWELL, DRIVES BILL TO WHITE HOUSE IN TRACTOR (8/26)

Lynn Cornwell, Glasgow-area rancher and president-elect of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, on Thursday officially delivered a bill to President Clinton that would repeal the estate tax, also called the "death" tax. He drove the bill from the U.S. Capitol to the White House in a red tractor.

"Lynn has been a good friend for a long time, and we have talked a lot about the terrible toll the death tax has taken on farmers and ranchers in Montana," Senator Conrad Burns (R-Mont.) said. "Small businesses, including farms and ranches, cannot survive in a family if folks have to sell off chunks every time they pass down from generation to generation. If President Clinton vetoes this bill, he is telling Montana’s ag community and small businesses that they don’t matter."

The Senate and House of Representatives passed the death tax elimination bill, but the president has threatened to veto it.

"This bill is not only important to cattle producers, but it’s important to all family farms and small businesses" Cornwell said. "Such taxes take away incentives to grow your business, and it affects your ability to pass your family ranch to the next generation. Congress has sent a message that it understands this. We’d like to see the president sign this bill."

Despite arguments that the death tax only affects the wealthy, Burns said that numerous reports show it has a large impact in Montana. Last year, the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service found that the death tax will cost Montanans $1.2 billion over 8 years.

"The fact is that the rich don’t pay the death tax, because they can hire people to help them get around it," Burns said. "It’s the small business owners and family farmers and ranchers who get shafted under the current system."

Earlier this year, another Montanan lent similar support to the bill. Dave McClure, president of the Montana Farm Bureau, attended a press conference with Burns and stressed that rural communities as a whole are being hurt by the death tax.

"Forced liquidation of farms and ranches is hurting Montana’s rural communities," McClure said. "We’re losing families in our rural communities that those communities depend on to keep the schools going and to keep the local grocery stores open."


LOCAL NATIONAL GUARD UNIT RETURNS FROM FIRE FIGHTING (8/24)
The Prairie Smoke Redlegs National Guardsmen, arrived back in Glasgow Thursday afternoon at 5:00pm. They were called to duty on August 11th for fire training, and were assigned southwest of Helena on Monday, August 14th. The Redlegs then were reassigned to the Maudlow/Toston fire last week.

There was a Welcome Back party for the soldiers on Thursday at the National Guard Armory across from the airport. It is a good possibility that they will be called back to active duty again. 

Here are a few photos taken on the Guardsmen's arrival in Glasgow:

b.jpg (66115 bytes) a.jpg (47203 bytes) d.jpg (51012 bytes) c.jpg (63383 bytes)

Those called to active duty were:

JASON BAKER NUFRY BOYSUN BEN BRELGE
GARY FAST TYLER FAST JAY FLEMING
BRITTEN FLICKINGER JOSH FROST LAWRENCE GARFIELD
STEVEN GOOD ROGER HENSCHEL JEREMIAH HUGHES
MICHAEL JENKS TRAVIS KIRCHDOERFER DAVID PARKER
LOREN REDDICK SCOTT RUNNINGEN JASON SKOLRUD
STEVEN STANLEY MYLES SUNDBY TODD SVENNINGSON
CHRISTOPHER UPCHURCH KENT WILLIAMSON DAVID WINKLER

BRANDT NAMED TO ECONOMIC TASK FORCE (8/23)
U.S. Senator Max Baucus and Billings banker Tom Scott today named 16 Montanans to an economic development task force designed to help boost the state's lagging economy and create good-paying jobs in Montana.

The 16-member task force that includes members from all over Montana and from all walks of life is the result of Baucus's June Economic Development Summit he held in Great Falls. The members, who represent all political persuasions and are leaders in their fields, are charged with developing a plan to help recharge Montanba's economy and push it off the bottom rung of national economic rankings.

Baucus said the task force will act on the recomendations from the summit and will serve as a line of communication between the congressional delegation, the new Montana Legislature, and the new governor.

Diane Brandt of Glasgow was named to the 16 member task force. Brandt is the co-owner of Sam's Supper Club in Glasgow and the president elect of Montana Walleyes Unlimited. She served on the on the Governor's Tourism Advisory council and currently serves on the Advisory Council of the Missouri River Basin Association.
FSA ANNOUNCES 48 HOUR NOTIFICATION AMS (8/23)
Producers who plan on marketing feeder lambs must fax the notification sheet for location of self-certified feeder lambs to AMS at least 48 working hours prior to the inspection period.

Please contact the Valley County FSA Office to obtain these forms and to get the FSA 383 application form. If you have further questions, please contact Sheri Daggett at 228-4321, ext. 112.
LONG RUN PUTS OUT 2 MORE FIRES (8/22)
The Valley County Long Run Fire Department responded to two fires this past weekend. According to Long Run Fire Chief Dan Carney the department responded to a grass fire Saturday evening near the George Kolstad residence on the Tampico Highway. The fire apparently was started by a train engine on the railroad right-away and was contanined to less than 50 acres by the fire department and took less than an hour and a half to contain.

On Sunday the department was called to a fire east of the railway crossing near Frazer when a feed elevator owned by Don Fast was on fire. The Long Run Fire Department responded with five units with help from Wolf Point, The Bureau of Indian Affairs, a truck from Frazer and a private tanker. The building was completely destroyed and the cause is unknown at this time. The fire took about 3 hours to contain and no injuries were sustained.
DODSON MAN IDENTIFIED (8/22)
(AP) The Dodson man who died when high winds hit the pickup truck he was riding in, was identified as Derek Ronald Johnson.

The twenty-year-old was hurt Sunday when a gust of wind ripped a camper off a pickup truck near Grass Range. He was riding inside the camper.

He later died at St. Vincent's Hospital in Billings.

The death pushed Montana's highway death toll to 142, or 14 more than at the same time last year. (Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
FORT PECK TOURISM UP (8/21)
(Billings Gazette)
According to an article in the BIllings Gazette, tourism is up for the Fort Peck Lake recreation area this summer. Through July this year, tourism is up 17.2% over 1999 figures, the biggest jump of any tourist attraction in the state.

Most areas in the western part of the state have been adversely affected by the dry conditions this summer, with Glacier National Park dropping 4.2% from last year's figures. Yellowstone was about the same, losing only .3% from 1999.

Other attractions increasing tourists this year include the Big Horn Recreation Area, up 12.6%, the Museum of the Rockies up 7.3%, Ulm Pishkun Visitor Center up 7%, Lewis & Clark Caverns up 3.7% and Havre Beneath the Streets up 2.7%. All stats were from Travel Montana.


DODSON MAN AMONG WEEKEND'S FATALITIES (8/21)
(AP)Three people were killed in separate crashes on Montana's highways over the weekend, raising the state's fatality toll to 142. That's 14 more than at this time last year. A gust of wind ripped a camper off a pickup truck driving near Grass Range yesterday afternoon, killing a 28-year-old Dodson man riding in the vehicle. His name has not been released.

Two people died in crashes on Saturday.

Twenty-six-year-old Russell Aisenbrey of Billings, died Saturday night, when the car he was riding in went off Montana 72 near Bridger. The vehicle went through a fence and struck a power pole.

Early Saturday, another person died when a vehicle went off U.S. 212 near Broadus, hit a culvert and went airborne. The patrol withheld the victim's name and hometown. (Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
MANG WANTS TO LEASE SITE AS BOMB TEST RANGE (8/21)
(Great Falls-AP) The Montana Air National Guard wants to lease a strip of land in north central Montana, to use as a bomb test range. The National Guard has been considering a site on the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation since May 1999, but Colonel Rex Tanberg Junior wants a backup plan. Tanberg says people who attended public meetings largely supported placing the test range, on the western edge of the reservation.

Still, the National Guard has approached the Bureau of Land Management and three private landowners, hoping to find a three mile by five mile patch of land north of the Missouri River, between Big Sandy and Glasgow.

They want to lease the land for at least 25 years.

For nearly two years, National Guard pilots have been flying as much as 380 miles to practice shooting ground targets at ranges in Idaho and Utah. (Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


INDIAN GAMING ASSOCIATION MEETS (8/19)
(Billings-AP) -- A review of current legislation, court action, and proposed by-law changes. All were part of the annual mid-year meeting of the National Indian Gaming Association in Billings.

Thursday's gathering included representatives of 168 tribes that have gambling operations. Montana members include the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, and the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes. The national group operates as an educational, legislative and public policy resource for tribes, on Indian gaming issues and tribal community development.

The association is working to arrange a two-hour educational forum, with tribal representatives and presidential candidates George W. Bush and Al Gore. They hope to televise it as well, sometime before the November 7th election.
Copyright 2000 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
THREE FATALITIES ALONG HI-LINE (8/19)
(AP) -- Officials have identifed three other people killed in highway crashes this week, in northern Montana.

The Highway Patrol says 39-year-old John Hafner of Wolf Point was killed, when his bicycle was struck from behind Wednesday evening. Both the bicyclist and the driver of the car were westbound, and the driver told the patrol she was blinded by the sun. Hafner, a doctor, died at the emergency room in Wolf Point.

Also Thursday, the patrol and the F-B-I identified two teen-agers who died in a rollover three miles south of the Fort Belknap Agency on the Fort Belknap Reservation. Nineteen-year-old Gerald Healy and 16-year-old Alden Nicholas Werk died about seven o-clock Thursday morning. The F-B-I and the patrol are investigating the crash, and have declined to release the circumstances. The F-B-I investigates crimes on the reservation.

Copyright 2000 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


LEVEL III FIRE RESTRICTIONS FOR MOST OF MONTANA (8/18)
The Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation has issued a proclamation that Level III Fire Restrictions are now in effect for Montana, including Valley County. The proclamation is for all State and private forested lands under the protection of the Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation lying within the boundaries of: Liberty, Chouteau, Judith Basin, Wheatland, Golden Valley, Fergus, Hill, Blaine, Phillips, Valley, Daniels, Sheridan, Roosevelt, McCone, Garfield, Petroleum, Musselshell, Yellowstone, Treasure, Big Horn, Rosebud, Powder River, Carter, Fallon, Custer, Wibaux, Prairie, Dawson and Richland counties. Level III restrictions include:

Control of Campfires
Building, maintaining, attending, or using a campfire or charcoal fire except at a developed, designated recreation site or campground. (36 CFR 261-52 (a)).
Control of Smoking
Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building; at an improved place of habitation; at a developed, designated recreation site or campground; or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is cleared of all flammable material. (36 CFR 261.52 (d)).
Control of Woods Operations
· Woods operations: Using chainsaws or other equipment with internal combustion engines for felling, bucking, skidding, wood cutting, road building, and other high fire risk operations between 1 p.m. and 1 a.m. local time. Exceptions are helicopter yarding and earth moving on areas of cleared and bare soil. Sawing incidental to loading operations on cleared landings is not necessarily restricted.
· Operating in Slash or Dead Material: Using chainsaws or other equipment with internal combustion engines for felling, bucking, skidding, wood cutting or any other operation within areas having a significant accumulation of dead or down slash or timber-
· Blasting and Welding: Welding, blasting (except seismic operations confined by ten or more feet of soil, sand or cuttings), and other activities with a high potential for causing forest fires. (36 CFR 261-52 (f) and (i))
· Patrolperson: To be included with woods operations, blasting and welding, and/or operating in slash or dead material causes if desired. A patrol is required for a period of two hours after woods operations including felling, bucking skidding, wood cutting, road building, blasting, welding and other high fire risk operations cease. A patrol is also required for one hour following the cessation of all work activity. The patrolperson's responsibilities include checking for compliance with required fire precautions.
Control of Off Road Vehicle Use
Possessing or using motorized vehicles such as, but not limited to cars, trucks, trail bikes, motorcycles and all terrain vehicles off of Forest Development Roads except for persons engaged in a trade, business or occupation in the area (36 CFR 261.56).


REUNION A SUCCESS BUT FUNDING COMES UP SHORT (8/18)
The Glasgow All School Reunion Committee has met following the successful
gathering of alumni, former students and faculty June 30-July 2. Deemed a
success by the vast majority of those 1,150 registrants plus spouses and
families, the Reunion Committee regretfully reports a financial downfall of
approximately $4,400.

For that reason, the committee is seeking donations from interested
individuals, families, or organizations that might wish to help defray the
expenses incurred. The two mailings to the 5,000 people cost $4,500.

The music for the dance - John Jackson on Friday night and Missoula¹s
Bop-a-Dips on Saturday- cost $7,000.

Another major expense for the voluntary committee that spearheaded the event
was the publication of an all-class reunion book that updated the graduates
since the initial All-Class Reunion book published in 1987. The new edition,
which carries the photos of graduating classes of 1988-2000, also has a
variety of other school-related information contained in it and is available
for a nominal $10. Some copies of the previous hardcover volume are also
available for $25. These volumes are a quick reference for names and faces
and can settle arguments! The books are for sale at the Pioneer Museum and
will also be available at the Glasgow Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture
office and at leckie3@nemontel.net for the updated book only. Proceeds from
sales of these books will be used to satisfy the already incurred debts.

Another expense taken by the all-school reunion was the fireworks on July
1st. Usually sponsored by the community at large, this year¹s display was
underwritten by the reunion committee since they were set off a bit earlier
in conjunction with other reunion activities. So, if you ordinarily donated
to the fireworks cost and were not registered at the reunion, why not
consider a donation at this time?

Having portable rest room facilities so readily accessible throughout the
reunion weekend was surely a convenience. But it was a convenience with a
cost attached.

The committee is quick to credit the community for help rendered. Without
the efforts of those individuals and groups, the out of town returnees would
not have enjoyed nearly so much the array of options open to them.

If you were able to visit with a former classmate, see a former teacher,
enjoyed the parade, the street dance, the fairgrounds, the walk-run, the
community church service or any of the other events of that packed weekend,
please help reduce the deficit by contacting any of the reunion committee:
Gloria Flatow, Sandy Dungan or Brenda Leckie.


GLASGOW-MALTA NATIONAL GUARD UNIT MOVES ON TO NEXT FIRE (8/17)

The soldiers of Detachment 1 Battery C 1-190th Field Artillery, Glasgow, and of Battery C 1-190th Field Artillery located in Malta, have completed containment of the BOULDER/HIGH ORE ROAD FIRE and have been reassigned and are on sight at the MAUDLOW/TOSTON FIRE located 25 miles north of Belgrade, Montana.

Glasgow and Malta’s First Sergeant, William Hammar, reports the soldier’s morale is high, there have not been any accidents and food has been outstanding.

The soldiers are in their 7th day of 15 day's State Active Duty.


MONTANA ANNOUNCES TOLL-FREE NUMBER FOR FIRE RECOVERY DONATIONS (8/17)
(HELENA)---The State of Montana activated a donation hotline today for those individuals or businesses choosing to donate goods, services, or funds to help assist Montana citizens with their recovery efforts from recent wildfires.

The Montana Fire Donation Hotline, at 1-800-505-7751, will be ready to take calls Monday - Friday from 8:00 am - 5:00 pm. Hotline staffers will explain to callers how to send their donations. Callers from the Helena area may dial 444-0400.

Governor Marc Racicot said, "A few weeks ago, many Montanans never thought they would be in a position of need. The ravages of recent wildfires have left many of our neighbors homeless and without even the basic necessities of life. America's reputation for generosity is unmatched throughout the world. For those who can and those whose hearts lead them to do so, this hotline offers a way to help Montana's fire victims."

Approximately 400,000 acres in Montana have been devastated by fire, and 1,400 homes have been evacuated. Montana is currently under a statewide disaster declaration.
GOVERNOR DECLARES MONTANA IN STATE OF DISASTER (8/17)
(Helena)-- Governor Marc Racicot declared Montana in a state of disaster Wednesday. Racicot's latest declaration allows more time flexibility than the emergency status he announced in late July.

The latest declaration was essential to carry forward the state's fire fighting efforts since the previous emergency declaration had expired. The emergency declaration issued July 27 was a 20 day order, while Wednesday's declaration of disaster is a 30-day order that can be extended.

The state has access to the same fire fighting resources as it did earlier, assuring that there will be no letup in fire suppression efforts.

"This executive order declaring a disaster was necessary to allow state resources, including the National Guard, to remain activated and available for fire suppression," said Mary Jo Fox, communications director for the Governor's Office.

Racicot's disaster declaration is identical to the earlier declaration of emergency, allowing him to tap state firefighting resources, mobilize the Montana National Guard and spend state treasury money where necessary, including to pay for food and lodging for guard and state employees responding to the disaster.
PAIR SENTENCED IN BURGLARIES (8/17)
19 year old Jason Jackson of Saco and 20 year old Christopher Magee of Malta have been sentenced in State District Court in Glasgow on charges stemming from 2 burglaries that occurred in Glasgow earlier this year.

According to court documents, between January 5th and January 6th, the detergent dispenser machine at the Culligan Laundromat in Glasgow was broken into. About $7 in change was removed. The connecting door into the office of Culligan Water Conditioning was also forced open. About $3.50 in change and a couple of dog water dishes were taken.

On January 8th a break-in was discovered at the IGA Laundromat. An estimated $640 in quarters were taken from the change machine and two gum ball machines were broken open.

Jackson and Magee in a plea agreement both pleaded guilty to one count of felony burglary, two counts of criminal mischief, both misdemeanors, and one count of misdemeanor theft.

Jackson was sentenced to six years with the Montana Department of Corrections for the felony burglary with three years suspended. He was also given a 6 month suspended sentence on the criminal mischief charge and a two year deferred sentence on the second criminal mischief charge. On the misdemeanor theft charge he was given a 6 month suspended sentence. He must also pay $1,987.71 in restitution.

Magee was also given a 6 year sentence on the felony theft charge with three years suspended but he will receive credit for 81 days that he has already spent in jail. For each of the two criminal mischief convictions, sentencing was deferred for two years. He was also given a six month suspended sentence for the misdemeanor theft conviction. He must also pay $1,987.71 in restitution.
HAY FIRE SOUTH OF GLASGOW (8/17)
On Wednesday afternoon about 2:00 pm a fire was reported at the Pankratz Place, south of Glasgow.

The fire was contained to the area around the farmstead. Approximately 160 round bales were destroyed in the fire. Burning material falling from the muffler area on the hay truck is the probable cause of the fire. Long Run responded with 6 trucks and 12 firefighters. Valley County Weed Control responded with 3 trucks and a water trailer and a crew of 7; the front end loader and operator from the land fill also responded. The trucks were back at the fire hall by around 9:00pm.

Two trucks and 4 firefighters returned to the fire scene and extinguished a flare up around 11:30 pm. Those trucks were back at the fire hall around 12:30am.

On Thursday evening the Valley County Weed Crew attended a wildland fire training class after they were released from the hay fire. They were instructed on fire fighting safety.
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WORLD'S LARGEST BURGER MAKES IT INTO GUINNESS BOOK (8/16)
"The World's Largest Hamburger, weighing in at 6,040 pounds of pure Montana beef, is being officially recognized by the Guinness World Records," according to Wayne Stahl, president of HiLine Promotions, Inc. of Saco, Montana.

The burger, cooked on a 24' diameter grill September 5, 1999, near Saco, Montana, outweighed the previous record by 520 pounds, thereby making history and into the record book.

The final decision lies within the editorial team as to whether the hamburger is included in the 2002 edition.

Louise Whetter, Researcher, London, England assured the group the hamburger, along with a profile of chef Loran Green, will be featured on the website which is to be launched October 23, 2000. The website address is www.guinnessworldrecords.com


RAIL LINE ALONG HI-LINE REOPENED (8/16)
(Malta-AP) -- Rail traffic resumed along the Montana Hi-Line Tuesday night following repairs at the Malta-area site of a Burlington Northern Santa Fe freight train derailment involving some tanker cars loaded with a poisonous chemical. R

ailway spokesman Gus Melonas says the route was reopened at seven p-m. But he says a decision hasn't been made yet about moving the chemicals. The options are pumping the chemicals from the derailed cars into other tankers or into truck tankers.

Cause of the derailment Monday night also remains under investigation.

Seven cars of the westbound freight derailed a mile east of Malta about eight o'clock Monday night, prompting the voluntary evacuation of about 50 people, including some nursing home residents. A portion of U-S Highway Two also was closed for about six hours.

Phillips County Sheriff Tom Miller said the evacuees were allowed to return home early Tuesday morning. Rail traffic was rerouted either along the B-N-S-F line from Laurel to Great Falls-Havre or on the Montana Rail Link route from Billings via Missoula to Sand Point, Idaho.

Three cars were rerailed Tuesday morning and the four others were moved aside to allow crews to repair the tracks. No injuries were reported, and officials said there were no tanker leaks. Three tankers contained carbon disulphide, a poisonous, highly flammable chemical used in making solvents and cellophane. (Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


EIGHT HUNDRED ACRE FIRE ON CMR IS OUT (8/16)

(Miles City-AP) -- The 800-acre, lightning-caused fire on the outskirts of the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge is now history. Amy Tague of the Bureau of Land Management reports the fire was demobilized Tuesday morning. She says the fire was fought by the B-L-M, as well as crews from Ft. Peck Reservation and Crow Agency. (Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


AUTHORITIES INVESTIGATING MALTA DERAILMENT (8/15)
(Malta-AP) -- Train traffic should resume late tonight (Tuesday), on the Burlington Northern Santa Fe main line across Montana, after a derailment last night near Malta. Seven cars derailed.

Three of them were tanker cars with a hazardous chemical, which prompted the voluntary evacuation of about 50 people, including some nursing home residents. U-S Highway Two was closed.

No leaks were found, people were allowed to return home, and the highway reopened after about six hours.

B-N spokesman Gus Melonas (muh-LOH'-nus) says they're still looking into what caused the derailment. There were no injuries.

Sparks from the derailment created small fires for miles along the track. They were extinguished with the help of area fire departments.


LATEST ON AREA FIRES (8/15)
Friday evening a grass fire was reported on the Jensen trail. A downed power line ignited a fire that burned a large area of grass sagebrush and some trees and threatened the golf course and area homes and buildings. Fire fighters from Long Run, St. Marie, Hinsdale and trucks from Valley County weed control were used to battle the fire. The city of Glasgow was on stand by with 1 truck and a crew. Heavy equipment from Fossum's Ready Mix and equipment from Zerbe Brothers was also ready if needed.

A total of 10 fire trucks and over 25 firefighters battled the blaze with help from many other people. People used shovels rakes and even clothing to help with the containment. Rural fire chief Dan Carney told KLTZ KLAN news Friday that Eastern Montana firefighters are battling fire just like in Western Montana.

Sunny Side club members helped by pulling hose or bringing drinking water.
Long run would like to thank the Valley county S.O., Glasgow Police Dept. and Montana High Way Patrol for their help with traffic control as traffic did make it hard for trucks to move to other areas of the fire.

Friday afternoon a fire was reported on Scout Island on the Missouri River. Fire crews from Fort Peck and The Federal Fish and Wild Life Service were stationed on both sides of the river. Crews did go onto the island and fought the fire until high winds forced them off.

In other fire news Long Run responded to a hay field fire north of the Cut across road on the Jensen trail on Wednesday afternoon. This fire was in the same area as a fire on Tuesday afternoon. It took three hours to extinguish the Wednesday blaze.
12 firefighters 7 trucks and 2 loaders from Fossums ready mix were used on that fire.
MAJORITY OF TEENS IN ACCIDENT SENT HOME (8/15)
(Great Falls-AP) -- The majority of the teen-agers in the church group injured in a three-vehicle crash over the weekend near Zortman have been released from hospitals.

Susan Meisdalen, who knows the victims through the Elim Lutheran Brethren Church in Malta, estimates all but five of the injured went home on Monday.

Fifteen teens between 12 and 18 went to several hospitals after two pickup trucks and a Suburban were involved in a chain-reaction collision Saturday.

The Montana Highway Patrol says 20 people were in the three vehicles.
(Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


HIGHWAY 2 RE-OPENED (8/15)

(AP) Highway 2 has been re-opened through Malta, after a train derailment last night. The 200 residents that were evacuated were also allowed to return to their homes this morning.
(Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


HIGHWAY 2 CLOSED, PART OF MALTA EVACUATED IN DERAILMENT (8/15)
(Malta-AP) -- Seven freight cars of a westbound Burlington Northern Santa Fe train, three of them tankers containing a poisonous chemical, derailed east of Malta during the night. Highway two was closed and some 200 residents evacuated as a precaution.

Initial reports were that none of the chemicals leaked.

B-N-S-F spokesman Gus Melonas says three of the tankers contained carbon disulphide, a poisonous, highly flammable chemical used in making solvents and cellophane. Two other tankers contain titanium dioxide and pose no threat to the environment, Melonas said. Another derailed car, containing glue, remained upright, as did an empty lumber car.

Melonas said the derailment occurred about 9:20 p-m on a 100-car train from Memphis, Tennessee., to Pasco, Washington.

Phillips County Fire Chief Clark Kelly says the train set fires along the right-of-way as far away as 20 to 30 miles to the east, toward Saco, and train personnel and others were fighting them. Within two hours, firemen from Malta and Dodson said they had the fires under control.

The Malta City Hall was opened for evacuees. Clark says it's possible the evacuees will be allowed to return and the highway reopened if railroad personnel confirmed there was no leak. But he says the region probably will be evacuated again and the highway closed when the tipped cars are lifted upright during the morning.
(Copyright 2000 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
GLASGOW NATIONAL GUARD UNIT ASSIGNED SOUTHWEST OF HELENA (8/14)
Ft. Harrison, MT - Over 160 citizen soldiers of the Montana Army National Guard completed fire fighting training August 13, 2000 at Ft. Harrison, Montana. They are a part of 224 soldiers called to duty from the 1st Battalion, 190th Field Artillery under the command of Lt. Col. John Patterson. Of the 224 soldiers deployed, 24 are from Glasgow and 38 from Malta. Most of these soldiers come from communities in eastern Montana. They received two days of intensive training covering a variety of subjects ranging from fire behavior, effects of weather, handling of fire fighting equipment and personal safety.

On Monday these soldiers were assigned to the HIGH ORE ROAD FIRE 30 miles southwest of Helena. Approximately 10,850 acres have burned and the fire is 85% contained.
DOWNED POWER LINE DEEMED CAUSE OF GOLF COURSE FIRE (8/14)
According to sources from the Long Run Fire Department, that Friday evening fire that threatened several homes and the Sunnyside Golf Course, was started by a downed powerline. No one was injured, and no structures were damaged in the grass fire on Friday.

Power lines were also suspected in the Scout Island fire that same evening. Northwest winds were gusting over 30 miles per hour at the time.


15 CHURCH YOUTH INJURED IN 3-CAR COLLISION (8/14)
(Zortman-AP) -- Fifteen young people were taken to hospitals, after three church vehicles, traveling together, collided over the weekend near Zortman.

The injured are between the ages of 12 and 18, and a Highway Patrol officer says none of the injuries are life-threatening.

Of the 20 people involved in the accident, ten were passengers in the backs of two pickup trucks. The lead vehicle was a Suburban.

According to the patrol, the three vehicles rear-ended each other in a chain reaction, on Seven-Up Road, 52 miles south of Malta off U-S 191. It happened early Saturday afternoon.

Victims were rushed by ambulance, helicopter and airplane to hospitals in Great Falls, Billings, Malta and Fort Belknap. Patrol Officer Roger Hinckley says speed and extremely dusty conditions contributed to the accident.
Copyright 2000 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
TEEN DIES FROM AUTO ACCIDENT INURIES (8/14)
According to the Montana Highway Patrol, 18 year old TJ Miller died Saturday of injuries sustained in an automobile accident August 5th. The Patrol told KLTZ/KLAN news that a vehicle driven by John Bilenerwitz and a single passenger, Miller, was headed 7.6 miles south of Opheim at approximately 4:45 am Saturday, August 5th when it took a turn too sharp and then overcorrected and rolled several times. Both occupants of the vehicle were ejected from the vehicle. Both were taken to the Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital in Glasgow; Miller was then evacuated to Billings, where he died one week after the accident.

The Montana Highway Patrol told KLTZ/KLAN news that alcohol was a factor in the accident and a driving under the influence and seatbelt violation have been issued to John Bilinerwitz. An investigation is continuing into the accident by the Montana Highway Patrol.
POPLAR MAN JAILED ON DRUG CHARGES (8/13)

(Billings Gazette) A Poplar man the government contends was, at one point, responsible for most of the drug trafficking on the Fort Peck Reservation was sentenced Thursday in Billings to 16-1/2 years in federal prison.

James Welch Jr., 26, received 80 months for conspiring to distribute drugs on the Northeastern Montana reservation and then got another 10 years for using a firearm in relation to drug trafficking. Under federal law, the gun sentence must be served consecutively with the drug sentence.

Chief U.S. District Judge Jack Shanstrom also ordered that Welch complete drug and alcohol treatment programs.

Welch was arrested as a result of a major investigation that concluded with the indictment and convictions of several people in Oregon and Montana in a conspiracy the government said involved 450 pounds of methamphetamine. Prosecutors said that a substantial amount of that total ended up on Montana Indian reservations.

One of the people who received drugs from suppliers in Oregon was Lisa Burshia. Burshia, in turn, drove the drugs to Fort Peck and delivered 90 percent of what she had to Welch, prosecutors said. When the Oregon source dried up, Welch found a new one and continued to deal drugs until July 1999, according to the government.

The firearm associated with Welch was an M-1 semiautomatic carbine. Prosecutors said that Welch and one of his distributors got into an dispute over drug proceeds in August 1999, and Welch used the gun in a drive-by shooting at the distributor’s home. No one was hurt in the incident, but use of the gun more than doubled his sentence.

Welch has been in custody in Billings since his arrest. He pleaded guilty in May to the conspiracy and firearms counts.


FIRES HIT VALLEY COUNTY (8/11)

Two fires were burning on Friday evening as the dry conditions finally caught up with Valley County. Mike Boyer was reporting that an island (Scout Island) was on fire north of Park Grove, late Friday afternoon, and officials were watching it to make sure it didn't jump across to mainland.

And north of Glasgow, a grass fire started between 4-5 on Friday afternoon, burning a swath of grass and endangering the Sunnyside Country Club and golf course. Northwest winds at 20-30mph hampered efforts to control the blaze, but fire fighters were helped in saving structures by the divide of Cherry Creek.

(Ed. note: All these shots were taken from the hills to the west of the fire, looking eastward.

The Long Run Fire Department and Glasgow Fire Department personnel along with many residents with shovels, tractors, and four-wheelers helped fight the blaze. As of 6:30pm, there was still a lot of smoke in the area, but no flames were visible from our vantage point on top of the hills. Fire fighters will be busy with hot spots throughout the evening.

 

 


LATEST MONTANA FIRE NEWS:
FWP SAYS SOME HUNTING SEASON OPENINGS WILL LIKELY BE DELAYED IN SOME AREAS OF WESTERN MONTANA

In response to questions raised by Gov. Marc Racicot's executive order to apply Level V restrictions to 10 western Montana counties-and the anticipated mailing of 92,000 hunting permits on Friday--FWP officials said today there will be a hunting season this year, but due to the extreme fire danger some hunting season openings may be delayed in some southwestern Montana areas.

FWP Director Pat Graham said the Level V restrictions prohibit all manner of outdoor recreation in the affected area, including fishing, hiking, picnicking, hunting, and the use of most State Parks, Fishing Access Sites and all FWP Wildlife Management Areas.

The Level V zone restrictions go into effect Friday, Aug. 11 and include: Deer Lodge, Granite, Mineral, Missoula, Powell, Ravalli, Sanders and Silver Bow counties, and the portion of Lewis & Clark County that lies west of the Continental Divide.

If weather and climate forecasts are on target, Graham said the restrictions on outdoor recreation in southwestern Montana are likely to extend beyond the scheduled opening day of several Montana's early September hunting season openings.

The upland game bird season and some moose, big horn sheep, and mountain goat seasons are scheduled to open statewide on Sept. 1. Montana's archery season is set to open statewide on Sept. 2.

"Unless there is a significant change in the predicted weather patterns, the early September opening of archery season, upland game bird season and our moose, sheep and goat seasons in west-central Montana will likely be delayed and similar delays could emerge in other areas," Graham said

In addition to the Level V designation for the 10 counties in western Montana, a Level IV designation has been issued for 16 additional counties in western Montana: Beaverhead, Broadwater, Cascade, Lincoln, Flathead, Gallatin, Glacier, Jefferson, Lewis and Clark east of the Continental Divide, Madison, Meagher, Park, Pondera, Sanders County that lies within the Kootenai National Forest, and Teton and Toole counties.

While Level IV does not prohibit recreation, it does impose restrictions on open fires, smoking, vehicle use, equipment use and other activities.

Graham said had the closures and restrictions not gone into effect, FWP was ready to restrict fishing on the Clark Fork, Bitterroot and Blackfoot rivers due to stress on wild trout due to low flows and life-threateningly high water temperature. In addition, Graham said FWP has created three-drought related response teams to further address statewide fishery, wildlife, and hunting-license issues.

"We are experiencing tragic drought and fire conditions that we know are now affecting our fisheries and our wildlife," Graham said.

Graham said FWP has fielded hundreds of calls since Tuesday from resident and out-of-state hunters on whether the hunting seasons will be affected by the drought, and recent forest closures.

"Today, we can only say that the drought and severe fire danger may delay the opening of some seasons in west-central Montana. Each day we will be monitoring how closures and restrictions in other parts of the state may affect the hunting seasons and immediately communicate that information to hunters and anglers in Montana and to our out-of-state visitors. It is our intention to inform resident and nonresident hunters of all anticipated hunting season delays due to area closures by Aug. 21."

Drought-related information will be posted on FWP's website at fwp.state.mt.us. Other fire-related information is available by calling toll-free 1-877-563-2876.

Use the following internet website for the latest fire information, including maps, restriction levels (and descriptions of what those restrictions entail), closures, etc.,
www.travel.state.mt.us/fire.htm

OPEN BURNING RESTRICTED ACROSS STATE

HELENA - Air quality monitoring information reviewed by the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) today prompted the department to prohibit open burning throughout the state until further notice.
        
"Open burning across the state by any person, agency, institution, business or industry is prohibited until further notice," according to David Klemp, DEQ air permitting section supervisor.  

"Particulate levels remain elevated at several monitoring sites throughout Montana.  The department determined that dispersion conditions are poor across Montana and that particulate concentrations are expected to remain high for the near future. All open burners are required to apply Best Available Control Technology (BACT) and the department has determined that current dispersion conditions and air quality levels do not meet BACT requirements."
        
The department also encourages persons and industries to do their best to minimize particulate emissions from other dust or smoke activities. "We are asking all Montanans to be good neighbors and do their part to reduce emissions during this period of poor ventilation and elevated particulate levels," Klemp said.
        
The DEQ will make a determination on a day-to-day basis whether to continue this prohibition on open burning.  The Open Burning Hotline at 1-800-225-6779 will be updated everyday by 4:00 p.m. with information on ventilation conditions and any further restrictions.
        
"Persons with respiratory problems or individuals interested in local air quality should check with city and county health departments to assess local conditions," Klemp said.  

"The DEQ will be working with health departments throughout the state to provide information on health issues."
        
If there are any questions regarding open burning, persons can call Klemp at the Air and Waste Management Bureau, DEQ (406-444-0286).
Use the following internet website for the latest fire information, including maps, restriction levels (and descriptions of what those restrictions entail), closures, etc.,
www.travel.state.mt.us/fire.htm

WILD FIRES FORCE GOVERNOR RACICOT TO CLOSE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE LAND IN A PORTION OF WESTERN MONTANA

(Helena)--- Governor Marc Racicot, in conjunction with Regional Forester Dale Bosworth, U.S. Forest Service and BLM State Director Mat Millenback, announced the closure of all forested lands (which includes grasslands located within half a mile of the forest) within the following counties, effective midnight Thursday, August 10th:

*       Sanders, Mineral, Missoula, Ravalli, Granite, Powell, Deer Lodge, Silver Bow, and that portion of Lewis and Clark county that lies west of the continental divide.

*       Bitterroot NF, Lolo NF, and those portions of the Helena and Beaverhead/Deer Lodge NF that lie west of the continental divide.

*        All BLM lands within the counties listed above

*       All tribal lands on the Flathead Indian Reservation

Governor Racicot cited the dangerous fire conditions existing within the forests as the impetus for the elevation in restrictions. "The record high fire danger with extreme fire potential, the limited fire-fighting resources available to respond to new fire starts and the several recent human-caused fires compel us to declare this elevated level of emergency," Governor Racicot said. "Conditions are such that it is dangerous for public to be in forested areas because of possibility of being trapped by a fast-spreading fire."

Currently within the SW Montana zone:
*       15 large fires are actively burning (largest is 90,000 acres)

*       Over 325,000 acres have already burned

*       33 confirmed structures lost to the fires with unofficial reports as high as 75 *       971 residents have been evacuated from their homes

Entry into closed areas requires a permit from the appropriate wildfire protection agency, except for homeowners whose principal residence is in a forested area.

The state waters of the Upper Clark Fork River Basin above the confluence of the Flathead and Clark Fork Rivers have been closed to all public recreation, including fishing.

A general permit for public use of the following areas has been approved by the Forest Service and the Department of Natural Resources Conservation (DNRC). The DNRC will update the list as conditions change. In addition, level IV fire restrictions remain in effect for all areas in the list that follows:

Seeley, Salmon, Alva, and Placid Lake waters and associated hosted campgrounds in Northern Missoula County
*       Quartz campgrounds on the lower Clark Fork River
*       Frenchtown Pond
*       Georgetown Lake
*       Thompson Falls State Park
*       Flathead Lake and associated campgrounds

The Governor suggested that people should contact the Forest Service or DNRC for additional areas open to the public and for activities that, with a written permit, may be issued.

Governor Racicot emphasized that this Level V closure does not affect Glacier National Park or Yellowstone National Park, as these areas are not located within this zone.
For additional information or questions regarding the closure, call:
*       877-563-2876 (toll free)
*       329-3805 (Missoula calling area)
Use the following internet website for the latest fire information, including maps, restriction levels (and descriptions of what those restrictions entail), closures, etc.,
www.travel.state.mt.us/fire.htm


CRAZY DAYS TO HIT GLASGOW ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY (8/10)
Crazy Days is back in Glasgow this Friday and Saturday. KLTZ/MIX-93 will combine stations from 6-9:30am on Friday, and provide lots of on-air and web coverage of the zaniness in Glasgow. There'll be lots of deals and food booths and...people dressed up in costumes, like the lifeguards from the Glasgow pool. Look for these X-MEN in costume on Friday!

TWO VALLEY COUNTY RESIDENTS PLEAD GUILTY IN ELK CASE (8/10)

On August 4th, two Valley County residents pleaded guilty in court to a
total of 19 misdemeanors. Under a plea agreement, Jim and Paul McColly of
Hinsdale agreed to charges stemming from 13 elk being killed north of
Hinsdale and the Canen Ranch. The investigation started in September of 1998
when Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks received information regarding numerous
elk illegally killed, abandoned and wasted. Thirteen elk were discovered and
consisted of two 5X5 bulls, one 2X3 bull, one spike bull, one undetermined
adult, six cows and two calves.

Jim McColly pleaded guilty to seven counts of wasting a game animal and
three counts of hunting during a closed season. Paul McColly pleaded guilty
to six counts of wasting a game animal and three counts of hunting during
closed season. The total penalties both parties incurred include $13,000
restitution, $770 in court costs, and $1,000 investigative costs. Also, each
individual was assessed three years probation, and a ten-year loss of
privileges to hunt, fish or trap in the state of Montana. In addition,
neither defendant will be allowed to accompany any person who is hunting,
fishing or trapping during the ten-year license revocation period. Montana
is a member of the Wildlife Violator Compact, which results in violators
losing privileges in other member states. These states include: Arizona,
Colorado, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Jim Satterfield, Region Six supervisor, stated, " The department wants to
work with land owner problems, such as depredation. Our field personnel
showed a tremendous amount of tenacity with this case as it was extended
over a long period of time. Clearly this shows people should not take the
law into their own hands. These situations can be solved with communication
amongst the people and our department before unfortunate circumstances
occur.

Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks encourage all Montanans to assist the
department in its efforts to protect and preserve Montana's hunting
heritage. Montanans can do so by calling Tip Mont (1-800-TIP-MONT), a toll
free hot line used to assist with the apprehension of game violators.
Individuals providing tips may be eligible for cash rewards and are
guaranteed anonymity.


GLASGOW NATIONAL GUARD UNTIL TO LEAVE FRIDAY (8/10)

Detachment 1 Battery C 1-190th Field Artillery has announced that 24
soldiers have been activated for fire-fighting duty, to be used as fire
crews battling the Montana fires.

The Glasgow unit will be departing by bus on August 11th en route to Fort
Harrison in Helena.

Soldiers from Billings, Harlowtown, Miles City, Glendive, Culbertson,
Sidney, Malta and Glasgow will perform 15 days in a state active duty status
and will report to Helena on August 11th for preliminary fire survival
training.

The Guardsmen will be trained by the Forest Service on Standards Survival
Training. Once the two-day course is completed, the ten 20-man fire crews
will be deployed as directed by the fire operations incident command.

To date, the Montana National Guard has approximately 450 soldiers and
airmen on state active duty conducting fire operations; including security,
medical services, helicopter water bucket operations, structures and
fire-line fire fighting, and other support services


CHAMBER ENCOURAGES ALL GROUPS TO PARTICIPATE IN HIGHLAND GAMES (8/9)
The Glasgow Chamber of Commerce & Agriculture would like to invite all groups and clubs to participate in the Highland Games on September 16th.

Highland Games is a fun family event that celebrates a taste of Scotland. For a fee of $25, your organization may have a booth in any number of prime locations. You may charge a fee as a fundraiser for your event. Some ideas include a cake walk, petting zoo, food booths, games, horse shoe contest, pie pan toss, wheelbarrow race and sack races.

The Chamber encourages our club to join in with the fun and take advantage of a wonderful opportunity to make money for your organization.

Please contact the Chamber at 228-2222 for more information.
NATURAL GAS PRICES AT HISTORIC HIGHS AND MAY GO HIGHER, MDU SAYS
(Billings-AP) -- In eastern Montana, customers of Montana-Dakota Utilities are paying a lot more for natural gas.

In Glasgow, retiree Walter Baynham says his "budget billing" amount for July was 119-dollars, up from 88 dollars a year ago.

Steve Van Dyke is a spokesman for M-D-U's parent company in Bismarck, North Dakota. He confirms that natural gas bills have jumped for M-D-U's 69-thousand customers -- mostly residential -- in eastern Montana; and 14-thousand in Wyoming.
Van Dyke told the Montana Public Service Commission, natural gas prices are sitting at historic highs this summer. He cites increased demand, lower exploration for new supplies, and reduced storage.

Van Dyke says M-D-U is paying much higher wholesale prices to its 50 producers.

FOREST FIRE AIR QUALITY INFORMATION AVAILABLE ON-LINE FROM MONTANA DEQ
HELENA -- Smoke from wildfire activity has resulted in potentially unhealthful air quality conditions in much of western Montana. The Montana Department of Environmental has established a website to keep the public informed about changes to air quality conditions across the state.

Daily updates are available via the DEQ Website at http://www.deq.state.mt.us or http://www.deq.state.mt.us/FireUpdates/Index.htm

The Montana Department of Commerce's Travel Montana website maintains a link to this site at http://travel.state.mt.us/fire.htm

The Forest Fire Air Quality Update provides daily updated tables identifying communities in Montana that are experiencing the most serious smoke problems.

The site provides a "Forest Fire Smoke Categories Table" that helps the public understand how various levels of smoke can have an affect on health. It also provides a "Visibility Ranges Table" used to determine forest fire smoke density and its hazard ranking. DEQ will provide daily updates during the remainder of the forest fire season as conditions warrant.
Particulate matter can increase susceptibility in people with existing heart or lung diseases -- such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or congestive heart disease -- and can aggravate existing medical conditions. The elderly are also sensitive to particulate matter exposure. When exposed to particulate matter, children and people with existing lung disease may not be able to breathe as deeply or vigorously as they normally would, and they may experience symptoms such as coughing and shortness of breath. Seek medical treatment if you have uncontrolled coughing, wheezing or choking, or if breathing difficulty does not subside indoors.


GLASGOW NATIONAL GUARD UNIT ACTIVATED TO FIGHT FIRES IN MONTANA (8/9)
The Glasgow unit of the Montana National Guard will be activated to fight one of the Montana fires. The unit will be sent to Helena for fire training then on to the fireline.
LONG RUN RESPONDS TO FIRE (8/9)
The Valley County Long Run Fire Department was called to a hay field fire on the Jensen Trail just north of the Cutacross Road on Tuesday afternoon at 4:45pm. Four trucks and 10 firefighters, along with help from 2 pickups with firefighting equipment and 6 men, contained the fire in about 45 minutes.

The fire burned approximately 5 acres. The fire was reported quickly and winds were light at the time of the blaze. It was caused by a swather hitting a rock and causing a spark. Long Run Fire Department would like to thank everyone who helped fight the fire.

OKLAHOMA SET FOR FORT PECK THEATRE THIS WEEKEND (8/7)
Everything’s up to date in Fort Peck as the hit musical Oklahoma! opens this weekend for a four-week run at the Fort Peck Theatre. Performances are scheduled Friday, Saturday, and Sunday evenings at 8 p.m. through September 3. Tickets are available at the door, with adult tickets priced at $10, seniors , $9 and students, $6.

Oklahoma! weaves a tale of prairie life at the turn of the century. The story of cowboy courtship and prairie rivalries is set to music that is loved by all generations. The melodies and words of Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin’, The Surrey With the Fringe on Top, People will Say We’re in Love, Everything’s Up to Date in Kansas City, and Oklahoma! have been part of the fabric of American life since the 1940s.

The cast includes members of the professional company, along with volunteer performers who live in Northeast Montana. In fact, Bill Bell of Glasgow appears as Pa Carnes, a role he enjoyed in 1970, the first summer season at the Theatre. Two Fort Peck Theatre veterans have accepted the challenge of lead roles: Mark Chenovick of Helena plays Curly and Carly Booth of Havre plays Laurey. In his third summer at the Theatre, Chenovick is remembered for his work in Forever Plaid, and as the Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz. Booth, in her second season, appeared as Chava in Fiddler on the Roof and Twila in Pump Boys and Dinettes. Other performers include: Robin O’Neill as Aunt Eller; Phillip Pace as Will Parker; Dave Odegard as Slim; Ryan Grigg and Ali Hakem; Marcie Fahlgren as Gertie; Christopher Kristant as Jud; Tom Klotz as Cord Elam; Christina Pastor as Ado Annie; Mike Turner as Mike; David Knierim as Joe; Lucas Ruggles as Sam; and Josh Feller as Fred. Oklahoma! is the final presentation in what has become the most successful season in 31 years of productions at the historic Fort Peck Theater. The season began with Annie and Grease.

For more information on Oklahoma!, call the Theatre at 406-526-9943.

Carly Booth of Havre, and Mark Chenovick of Helena, play the lead roles of Laurey and Curly in the Fort Peck Theatre production of Oklahoma! The beloved musical plays Friday, Saturday and Sundays at 8 p.m. in the Theatre at Fort Peck. Tickets are $10 for adults, $9 for seniors, and $6 for students, and they are available at the door. Oklahoma! opens this weekend and plays through Sept. 3. For more information, call the Theatre at 406-526-9943.


RON SEELHOFF WINS FORT PECK PWT (8/7)

Ron Seelhoff of Lewellen, Nebraska, won the Fort Peck Professional Walleye Trail event on Friday, with a total of 16 fish and a total weight of 85.64. Larry Lambert of Marblehead, Ohio, finished second with 81.17 pounds of walleye. Seelhoff grabbed $50,000 in winnings while Lambert took home $15,000.

For amateurs, Randy Tyler of Hometown, Illinois, was first with 72.93 pounds of walleye. Mark Fling of Arvada, Colorado, was second with 66.66 pounds of walleye. Sever Enkerud was the top local fisherman, with 44.32 pounds of walleye, good enough for 17th place. Tyler won $12,000 while Fling won $4,500. Enkerud took home an even grand.

For full listings, visit the In-fisherman website. and for lots of pictures, visit our own PWT page.


Obituaries


Richard Stanley Kalinski

Richard Stanley Kalinski passed away at Yuma Regional Medical Center on August
29th at age 46. Graveside services will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, September 1st, at Desert Lawn Memorial Park. A reception in his honor will be held following the services at the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 225 South 1st Avenue, Yuma, Arizona.

He was born in Glasgow in 1954 and was a bartender in Glasgow and Malta for 17 years, and after moving to Yuma in 1990, displayed his tremendous talent as a carpenter. His wit, natural abilities and perfectionist manner ensured his success in both chosen professions. A private, reserved man, Rick enjoyed good friends, a good drink and both listening to and telling "a good story." His unending sense of humor and total devotion to family and friends will be missed by all who knew him.

Survivors include his wife M.J. of Yuma; 1 brother, Ron of Las Vegas; and 2 nephews, John and Jeff of Glasgow.


Kathryn Sethne

Kathryn Sethne of Glasgow, died at her daughter's home in Sheridan, Wyoming, on August 26th. Kathryn was 77. Services will be on Saturday, September 2nd, at 10 a.m. at the First Lutheran Church in Glasgow, with Reverend Mark Koonz officiating and with burial in Highland Cemetery. Bell Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Kathryn was born in 1922 in Richey, Montana, to Ladislav and Hazel Sedlacek. After attending schools in Richey and Fairview, she graduated in 1940. She worked at the Richland County Courthouse and as World War II began, she and a friend went to work in Portland, Oregon, as welders in the shipyards. Later she returned to Montana and enrolled in the Cadet Nursing Program at Montana State College in Bozeman. She graduated as an R.N. in 1946 and worked at the Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital in Glasgow and also in Moscow, Idaho. While at Frances Mahon Deaconess Hospital she met Harold Sethne and they were married in Fairview in 1947. They moved to the family farm in the Wildrose community, north of Glasgow, where they raised their daughters. Kathryn and her husband spent their last 28 winters in Mesa, Arizona, where she enjoyed golfing and working as a volunteer at the Valley Lutheran Hospital. She was an Eastern Star Member and a member of Our Savior's Lutheran Church of Larslan and Our Savior's Lutheran Church of Mesa, Arizona. In the summer she played golf on the Opheim Women's League. Her joys were her grandchildren and family as well as gardening and needlework.

Survivors include her husband Harold of Larslan; 2 daughters: Karen Dehn and her husband Art of Sheridan, Wyoming, and Janet Gabriel and her husband Larne of Redmond, Washington; 5 grandchildren: Katie Dehn Whitehouse of Portland, Oregon, Kari Dehn of Portland, and Amy, Matt and Bryannae'a Gabriel of Redmond; 1 sister, Lucille Collins of Fairview; 1 brother, Ben Sedlacek of Fairview; and several nieces and nephews.


Stacie Simshaw

Stacie Simshaw, 94, died of natural causes on August 15th at Valley View Nursing Home in Glasgow. Services will be Monday, August 21st at the Bell Chapel in Glasgow at 2 pm with Reverend Chris Flohr officiating. Burial will be in Butte, North Dakota. Bell Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Stacie was born and raised in Butte, North Dakota, and married Phil Simshaw in Minot in 1927. They lived on a farm near Butte until 1940 when they moved to Glentana, Montana, where Phil was depot agent until 1953; they then moved to Alexander, North Dakota. Phil died in 1988. Stacie lived in Alexander until she entered Valley View Nursing Home in Glasgow. Stacie was a member of the Lutheran Church, had loved to garden, crochet, plant flowers and enjoyed her grandchildren. She had 3 sisters and 8 brothers and was the only one remaining of her family.

Survivors include 4 sons: Roger, Verne, Phil and Ted, all of Portland, Oregon; 4 daughters: Nadine Ross of Opheim, Betty Ramsbacher of Fort Peck, Martha Simshaw of Portland and Carol Wright of Hawaii; 37 grandchildren and numerous great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband and one son, Cliff.


George Alexander
George Alexander, 81, died of natural causes at Valley View Nursing Home in Glasgow on August 10th. Services will be at Bell Chapel on Monday, August 21st, at 10am, with Pastor Chris Flohr officiating and with burial in Highland Cemetery. Bell Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

George was born in Seattle in 1919. He graduated from high school in Great Falls and then joined the U.S. Army and served in France and Italy and North Africa. He served for over 21 years. He married Anita Gullickson in Glasgow in 1972. George has lived in Glasgow since 1970; from 1945-46 he drove Greyhound Bus between Coeur d' Alene, Idaho, Spokane and Butte. George worked for the railroad for 5 years and he enjoyed visiting with the "rails" at the depot, cooking, watching TV and following the stock market. He was a member of the VFW.

Survivors include his wife Anita of Glasgow and 1 step-son, Frank Hogan of Texas. He was preceded in death by one son, Steven, in 1989.


Anthony TJ LeRoy Miller

Anthony TJ LeRoy Miller, 18, died at Billings Deaconess Medical Center on Saturday, August 12th, of injuries sustained in a car accident. Services will be Thursday, August 17th, at 10am at First Lutheran Church in Glasgow with Reverend Mark Koonz officiating and with burial in Highland Cemetery. Bell Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

He was born in Glasgow in 1982 to Tony and Pam Miller, and attended Opheim schools, graduating from Opheim High in 2000. He was employed at the Opheim Farmer's Elevator for the past few years. In August of 1999 he enlisted in the Montana Air National Guard. He loved working on vehicles, helping area farmers, and spending time with family and friends. He especially enjoyed his job at the elevator and visiting with anyone he saw. He gave the gift of laughter with his wonderful sense of humor.

Survivors include his parents, Tony and Pam Miller of Glasgow; 1 brother, Justin Miller of Glasgow; 1 sister, MaKenzie Miller of Glasgow; aunts & uncles: George & Joey Eastman of Glasgow, Paul & LeAnne Koski of Glasgow, Tim & Connie Miller of Opheim and Ray Miller of Opheim; cousins: Lacie Eastman, Cassie Eastman, Jordan Koski, Dillon Koski, Tyler Koski, Nathan Miller and Tanisha Miller; grandparents: LeRoy & Rose Johnson of Glasgow, and Ted & Colleen Miller of Opheim; he is also survived by his numerous friends.


William F. Anderson
William F. Anderson of Manhattan, Montana, a longtime Glasgow rancher, died of natural causes at his home on Saturday. He was 84. A memorial service is set for 11am Saturday, August 12th, at the First Lutheran Church in Glasgow. K&L Mortuary of Three Forks is in charge of arrangements.

William was born in 1915 in Glasgow and spent most of his life on the same ranch his parents homesteaded in the early 1900's. He also worked on the Fort Peck Dam, then moved to the Hill Ranch on Cherry Creek. He retired in 1980 and moved to Manhattan.

He married Irna Norby; she died in 1995.

William enjoyed fishing, hunting, geology and area and western history, particularly ghost towns.

Survivors include 3 sons: Wayne Anderson of Glasgow, Dennis Anderson of Cascade and Bill Anderson of Whitehall; 2 sisters: Anna Gailard of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Esther Christianson of Kalamazoo, Michigan; 7 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren.


Kathe Karoline Dreger
Kathe Karoline Dreger, 92, died at her home in Glasgow of natural causes on August
8th. Services will be Friday, August 11th, at 2pm at Bell Chapel with burial in Highland Cemetery. Bell Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Kathe was born in Francop, Hamburg, Germany, in 1907. She grew up near Hamburg and helped at the home business which included an orchard, bakery store and chores. She married Bert Dreger in 1931 and the following March they came to America where she lived on a farm south of Richland until she retired. Bert & Kathe moved to Dallas, Oregon, where Bert passed away in 1974. Kathe moved back to Glasgow in 1996 where she has lived with here daughter Dorothy. She was active in Lutheran Ladies Aid and the Senior Citizens Organization. She enjoyed embroidery, sewing, music, traveling, gardening and flowers. She enjoyed returning to Germany to visit relatives. She enjoyed seeing her grandchildren and great grandchildren accomplish their goals.

Survivors include 2 daughters: Dorothy Dreger of Glasgow and Hilda Williams of Lovell, Wyoming; 1 sister, Magda Behr of Hamburg, Germany; 4 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren.

Charlotte A. Hart

Charlotte A. Hart, 81, died of natural causes on Saturday, August 5th, at Valley View Nursing Home in Glasgow. Services will be Wednesday, August 9th, at 2pm at St. Matthew's Episcopal Church in Glasgow with Reverend Martin Mock officiating and with burial in Highland Cemetery. Bell Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Char was born in 1918 in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and was raised an attended schools in St. Paul. She married Don S. Hart in 1945 in St. Paul. They moved to Wolf Point in 1954 and then to Glasgow in 1955, where she has resided since. Char worked at Ben Franlkin and later at Torks Drug and Valley Drug for many years. She enjoyed reading, crossword puzzles, and latch hook sewing. She was a member of the St. Matthew's Episcopal Church.

Survivors include 1 daughter, Linda Carter of Missoula; 1 son, Mike Hart of Casper, Wyoming; 2 sisters: Gerry Knutson of Egan, Minnesota, and Betty Chambers of North St. Paul, Minnesota; 5 grandchildren and 3 great grandchildren.


Marcus Robert Edward "Red" Svingen

Robert Edward "Red" Marcus Svingen, 78, died of cancer at Frances Mahon
Deaconess Hospital in Glasgow on Tuesday, August 1st. Services will be
Friday, August 4th at 2pm at the First Lutheran Church in Glasgow, with
Reverend Martin Mock officiating and with burial in a private cemetery. Bell
Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Red was born in Frazer in 1921 and was raised in Glasgow, joining the
Marines in 1942. He served in the South Pacific, landed in Okinawa on the
second day, which was Easter Sunday. He later served in Korea. He married
Virginia Sophia Beadle in Great Falls. They lived in Glasgow where Red was
Chief Clerk with the Great Northern, and then later with the Burlington
Northern, retiring in 1982. He loved hunting and fishing. His main love was
good hunting. Red had a cabin on Nelson Reservoir and considered it his
favorite place on earth. He especially loved his grandchildren. He was Past
President of the Fort Peck Retriever Club and lifetime member of the VFW and
Elks.

Survivors include his wife Virginia Svingen of Glasgow; 2 sons: Jon and his
wife Lynnette of Glasgow and Robert and his wife Carolyn of Glasgow; 2
stepsons: Gordon Brown of Glasgow and Jerald Brown of Texas; 10
grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren.