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Monday, August 29th 2016
Associated Press North Dakota News
Latest North Dakota news, sports, business and entertainment at 6:20 a.m. CDT
PEDESTRIAN FATAL

Patrol IDs Langdon woman hit and killed by SUV while running

LANGDON, N.D. (AP) — The Highway Patrol has identified a Langdon woman who was struck by a vehicle and killed while she was running with her dog.

Authorities say 31-year-old Stella Brown died about 9:15 p.m. Saturday after being hit by a sport utility vehicle on state Highway 5, about a mile east of Langdon.

The patrol says the 25-year-old Langdon man driving the SUV was coming home from work. Authorities are still investigating whether any charges are warranted.

SCULPTURE VANDALIZED

Vandals target world's largest Holstein cow sculpture

(Information from: Bismarck Tribune, http://www.bismarcktribune.com)

NEW SALEM, N.D. (AP) — One of North Dakota's most visible landmarks has been the target of graffiti vandals this summer.

Salem Sue is billed as the world's largest Holstein cow. It has stood above the town of New Salem since 1974 and can be seen from Interstate 94. It draws about 3,000 people a month.

The Bismarck Tribune reports that vandals have written in bold markers on the belly of sculpture, declaring that "they were there."

The New Salem Lion's Club is responsible for maintaining the sculpture. Club president Kirk Toepke says it's not the first time that members have been called upon to scrub the cow.

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CAPTURING CARBON

North Dakota coal industry seeks funds for carbon projects

(Information from: Bismarck Tribune, http://www.bismarcktribune.com)

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Federal lawmakers and coal industry leaders are pushing for funding to help commercialize carbon-capture projects for old and new power plants.

The Bismarck Tribune reports that Republican U.S. Sen. John Hoeven and industry leaders met with Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz earlier this month to discuss such projects.

The group pitched Project Tundra, a partnership between Allete Clean Energy, Minnkota Power and BNI Coal to retrofit existing plants to capture carbon dioxide to use in enhanced oil recovery. They also discussed the zero-emissions Allam Cycle pilot project for new power plants, which uses compressed carbon dioxide to drive turbines.

Hoeven says there should be a focus on moving technology beyond lab research to field test commercially viable projects.

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NASA-DRONES

Feds turn to space experts NASA for small-drone traffic plan

GRAND FORKS, N.D. (AP) — America's space agency is entering the second phase of a four-step plan to draw up rules of the road for small drones that fly under 500 feet.

The NASA project is meant to develop performance standards for drones that would be used for commercial purposes by companies such as Amazon and Google. It is a virtual system designed to help drone operators deal with weather conditions, restricted air space, airport congestion and other obstacles.

NASA is looking to present its research to the Federal Aviation Administration by the end of 2019. By that time, it estimates there will be seven million small drones in operation, including 2.6 million aircraft for commercial use.

The second phase of the project will include testing flights beyond visual line-of-sight of the operator.

WETLAND PRESERVATION-PILOT PROJECT

Pilot project aims for farm-friendly wetland preservation

(Information from: Bismarck Tribune, http://www.bismarcktribune.com)

CLEVELAND, N.D. (AP) — Supporters of a program that pays farmers to not alter wetlands on valuable cropland want to include it in the next federal farm bill.

The North Dakota Working Wetlands Pilot Project compensates producers for what they lose by not farming seasonal wetlands that are important to duck production.

Delta Waterfowl in 2014 applied for and received $1.75 million from a state outdoor heritage fund for the effort. The group also pitched in money, along with the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service, bringing the total to about $5 million.

The Bismarck Tribune reports the project resulted in 124 contracts covering almost 9,400 wetlands.

Delta Waterfowl wants to include a larger version of the pilot project in the next farm bill. They're being aided by research from North Dakota State University.

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CHILD EXPLOITATION-GRANT

Effort to prevent online exploitation of children gets boost

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The North Dakota Attorney General's Office is getting a $230,000 federal grant to help prevent online exploitation of children.

Members of the state's congressional delegation say the money is coming through the U.S. Justice Department's National Internet Crimes against Children Task Force.

The grant will help the state Bureau of Criminal Investigation train and equip affiliate agencies for computer forensics investigations. It also will help the agency maintain parole and probation officers who manage sex offender caseloads.


Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Sunday, August 28th 2016
Associated Press North Dakota News
Latest North Dakota news, sports, business and entertainment at 6:20 a.m. CDT
CHARLESTON SOUTHERN-N DAKOTA ST

Frazier's OT run lifts NDSU over Charleston Southern 24-17

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — King Frazier scored on a 25-yard run in the first play of overtime and North Dakota State held on its defensive series to beat Charleston Southern 24-17 in the national FCS opener Saturday night.

Frazier started his run bunched in behind the line, then burst out to the right and raced down the sideline. The Bison then held the Buccaneers to no gain on all four downs to secure the win in the first overtime home game in school history.

Frazier finished with 79 yards on 11 carries, and Easton Stick threw for 194 yards with two touchdowns and an interception.

Mike Holloway ran 10 times for 126 yards and two touchdowns for Charleston Southern. His 6-yard run tied it at 17 with 2:59 left.

The Buccaneers had a chance to win in regulation, but Jacob Smoak hooked a 51-yard field-goal attempt to the left as time ran out.

HOCKEY ASSOCIATION-THEFT

2 woman accused of stealingfrom West Fargo hockey group

(Information from: KFGO-AM, http://www.kfgo.com)

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — Authorities say two woman who worked for the West Fargo Hockey Association's bingo operation have been arrested for theft.

KFGO-AM reports the hockey association suspected employee theft from the bingo game operations at the M&J Saloon in West Fargo.

West Fargo police say more than $10,000 was stolen over an extended period of time.

Police say the investigation is still ongoing.

___

BISON BEGIN

Bison football starts quest for 6th straight national title

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — The five-time defending national champion North Dakota State University football team is getting ready to start the quest for a sixth straight Football Championship Subdivision crown.

The top-ranked Bison open the season Saturday against No. 6 Charleston Southern, a team that reached the FCS quarterfinals last season. Game time at the Fargodome is 6:30 p.m.

ESPN is airing the game live as its third annual FCS Kickoff game.

FARGO FOOD COOPERATIVE

New Fargo food cooperative names Kopperud general manager

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — A former regional coordinator for Whole Foods Market will be leading a planned food cooperative in North Dakota's largest city.

Prairie Roots Food Co-op in Fargo has named Kurt Kopperud as its general manager. The store is scheduled to open the downtown area in the spring of 2017.

Kopperud, a Fargo native, has extensive experience in the grocery business, starting as a clerk at Hornbacher's Foods in Fargo in 1997.

Kopperud spent six years in San Francisco with Whole Foods, where he helped open a new store on Haight Street.

Prairie Roots Food Co-op has more than 1,200 members.

CORPORATE FARMING LAWSUIT

Lawsuit over anti-corporate farming law adds plaintiffs

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The number of plaintiffs suing to abolish North Dakota's anti-corporate farming law has expanded.

The North Dakota Farm Bureau, a Wisconsin dairy farmer and a Wisconsin dairy company seeking to expand into North Dakota sued in federal court in June. They want a judge to declare the law unconstitutional.

The original plaintiffs have now been joined by a North Dakota hog farmer with ties to a hog operation with partners in North Dakota, South Dakota and Iowa; the North Dakota Pork Council; a North Dakota cattle rancher; and a company that provides cattle consulting and export services and also owns two ranches in the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan.

Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem is defending the law. He says the addition of plaintiffs exacerbates problems with an overly vague lawsuit.

OIL PIPELINE-PROTEST

Far-reaching tribal solidarity displayed at pipeline protest

NEAR THE STANDING ROCK SIOUX RESERVATION, N.D. (AP) — Native Americans from reservations hundreds of miles away from North Dakota have joined the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's growing protest against a $3.8 billion four-state oil pipeline that they say could disturb sacred sites and impact drinking water for 8,000 tribal members and millions further downstream.

About 30 people have been arrested in recent weeks, and the Texas-based company has temporarily stopped construction.

A federal judge will rule before Sept. 9 on whether construction can be halted on the Dakota Access pipeline, which will pass through Iowa, Illinois, North Dakota and South Dakota.

One of the protesters is an 11-year-old Navajo girl who sold about 50 homemade soaps and gave the money to protest organizers. Her own home has no running water, and her sales pitch was "I don't want water to be poisoned."


Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Saturday, August 27th 2016
Associated Press North Dakota News
AP-ND--2nd Right Now/749
Latest North Dakota news, sports, business and entertainment at 6:20 a.m. CDT
BISON BEGIN

Bison football starts quest for 6th straight national title

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — The five-time defending national champion North Dakota State University football team is getting ready to start the quest for a sixth straight Football Championship Subdivision crown.

The top-ranked Bison open the season Saturday against No. 6 Charleston Southern, a team that reached the FCS quarterfinals last season. Game time at the Fargodome is 6:30 p.m.

ESPN is airing the game live as its third annual FCS Kickoff game.

FARGO FOOD COOPERATIVE

New Fargo food cooperative names Kopperud general manager

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — A former regional coordinator for Whole Foods Market will be leading a planned food cooperative in North Dakota's largest city.

Prairie Roots Food Co-op in Fargo has named Kurt Kopperud as its general manager. The store is scheduled to open the downtown area in the spring of 2017.

Kopperud, a Fargo native, has extensive experience in the grocery business, starting as a clerk at Hornbacher's Foods in Fargo in 1997.

Kopperud spent six years in San Francisco with Whole Foods, where he helped open a new store on Haight Street.

Prairie Roots Food Co-op has more than 1,200 members.

CORPORATE FARMING LAWSUIT

Lawsuit over anti-corporate farming law adds plaintiffs

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The number of plaintiffs suing to abolish North Dakota's anti-corporate farming law has expanded.

The North Dakota Farm Bureau, a Wisconsin dairy farmer and a Wisconsin dairy company seeking to expand into North Dakota sued in federal court in June. They want a judge to declare the law unconstitutional.

The original plaintiffs have now been joined by a North Dakota hog farmer with ties to a hog operation with partners in North Dakota, South Dakota and Iowa; the North Dakota Pork Council; a North Dakota cattle rancher; and a company that provides cattle consulting and export services and also owns two ranches in the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan.

Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem is defending the law. He says the addition of plaintiffs exacerbates problems with an overly vague lawsuit.

CASSELTON DERAILMENT-LAWSUIT

Train engineer: Suit over derailment belongs in state court

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — The engineer who was at the helm of a BNSF train that derailed near Casselton in 2013 says his lawsuit against a Pennsylvania steel company should be heard in state court.

Bryan Thompson filed suit in East Central District Court accusing Standard Steel of manufacturing a faulty axle that was found after the accident to be broken. The steel company moved the complaint to federal court.

Thompson's attorneys say federal law does not allow a Federal Employers' Liability Act lawsuit brought in state court to be switched to federal court.

The accident about 30 miles west of Fargo on Dec. 30, 2013, set off a fire that could be seen from nearly 10 miles away. Thompson says he suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder and isn't capable of returning to work.

JUDGE RETIRING

Presiding judge in Northwest Judicial District to retire

WILLISTON, N.D. (AP) — The presiding judge in North Dakota's Northwest Judicial District is calling it a career.

The state Supreme Court says Judge David Nelson plans to retire at the end of the year.

Nelson was elected district judge in 1994 and has been re-elected four times since. Before that he was in private practice in Williston, and served as a municipal judge for a decade starting in 1984.

The Supreme Court is required by law to determine if the judgeship should be retained in Williston, moved or eliminated. It would be filled by appointment.

FOSSIL FINDS

Fossil hunters make interesting finds during public digs

(Information from: KFGO-AM, http://www.kfgo.com)

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — Fossil hunters led by experts from the North Dakota Geological Society have made some interesting finds during annual public digs this summer.

Senior Paleontologist Clint Boyd tells KFGO radio the discoveries include a large bird found in a sandstone deposit near Medora. The presbyornis is about the size of a Canada goose. The fossil bed is about 60 million years old and used to be a swamp.?

At another dig at the Pembina Gorge near Walhalla, diggers discovered a fossil bone from a massive, 80-million-year-old aquatic lizard called a mosasaur.

Boyd says officials also found a 30-million-year-old partial skeleton of an alligator at a site near Dickinson.

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Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.